1. A war room of strategic breakthroughs and other tools

    April 7, 2018 by ahmed

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    Originally posted on Blogrige by Dawn Bailey

    When an organization ponders a journey to performance excellence, it may wonder where to begin, what to measure, and what to expect, including what short-term successes are achievable. Such pondering could be made much simpler with a field guide.
    Jayne Pope, chief executive officer, and Emily Padula, chief strategy officer, for 2014 Baldrige Award recipient Hill Country Memorial (HCM), will share their strategy at a session titled “A Field Guide to HCM’s Remarkable Strategic Breakthroughs” at the Baldrige Program’s annual Quest for Excellence® Conference in April.

    In a recent virtual exchange (captured below), Pope and Padula collaborated on answering questions, ranging from their upcoming presentation to their funniest Baldrige moment.

    What will Quest for Excellence attendees learn at your conference session?
    Participants will learn how HCM develops its strategic goals and fully deploys them throughout the organization, with specific tools and measurable outcomes. The presentation is a field guide to achieving your next strategic breakthrough.

    How has your organization benefited from its journey to excellence?
    The Strategic Breakthrough Initiative (SBI) is one of the processes that HCM has embraced along its Baldrige journey. It has given us the focus we needed to accomplish hundreds of strategic action items. We started SBIs in 2011 and saw huge improvements within two years. We are now reaching twice as many of our strategic goals.

    As a Baldrige Award recipient, HCM started a Sharing Days program for organizations on performance excellence journeys. Over time, we have shared some of our helpful practices with hundreds of people. Our SBI process and war room format became a popular takeaway. We have since had many attendees send us back pictures of their “war rooms” and tell us how helpful the SBI process has been for them. The process has worked for all kinds of organizations, including a luxury car company, schools, banks, universities, and other hospitals.

    What are your top tips for introducing or sustaining use of the Baldrige framework to promote an organization’s success?
    At HCM, we regularly measure internally and assess our performance on all the typical items you would find in Baldrige Criteria category 7 (results). We measure externally through annual Baldrige coaching assessments, which help us identify our strengths and our performance excellence gaps.

    We learned so much from completing the Baldrige application for so many years. It was the best education process for us. We continue to complete some version of the application every year, even though we are not eligible to apply again for a few years.

    What do you view as key reasons or ways that health care organizations benefit from using the Baldrige framework?
    In health care, we owe it to our patients and community to be the best that we can be. The Baldrige framework sets the highest bar. It helps us to figure out how to be best in every aspect of our business, from workforce engagement to patient safety. We compare ourselves to the very best, and we learn from them while being challenged to become better.

    What is your “elevator pitch” about the Baldrige framework and/or assessment approach? In other words, what would you say to a group of senior leaders who are unfamiliar with the Baldrige framework if you had 1-2 minutes to tell them something about it?
    We would say that Baldrige is a proven means of making your organization great for the people it serves and those who work for you. The framework supports long-term sustainability and leads to innovation—which is especially needed right now in the health care world, as well as in many other industries.

    Do you have any funny stories or anecdotes that you’re willing to share about your experience with Baldrige?
    The funniest story happened at our Sharing Days. Two reluctant employees were sent by their boss to learn about the hospital’s Baldrige experience. By the end of the program, the women were really engaged and excited to share their Baldrige knowledge with their boss. A few days later, we received a photo of them wearing red t-shirts that said—We drank the Baldrige Kool-Aid!


  2. The 4 mistakes that leave you wondering about your business performance

    April 6, 2018 by ahmed

    measure_success

    Originally posted on SavvySME

    • Measuring your business performance is a difficult task, but if not done with care and the right tools.
    • Some mistakes businesses commonly make is using KPIs not specific to your business and ones that focus on actions, not results.
    • Other mistakes include staff not engaging with the business’ desired results and searching for the nonexistent “perfect measure”.

    A long common issue we come across when we talk to business owners and executives is the difficulty they have determining whether their current performance is on track to achieve their operational and longer term strategic goals and objectives.

    Often our conversations with clients start something like “I have to convince my board members, managers or business owners that we will achieve our goals. How do I do this, and how do I give them evidence to show that we are on track to do so?”

    Most businesses have some sort of performance measures or KPIs. However, choosing the right measures is fraught with difficulty. Managers often struggle with finding meaningful KPIs, and then struggle again to obtain buy-in from management and staff. The result is KPIs that measure activities and not outcomes, that are vague and meaningless, and that lack ownership from key stakeholders.

    Firstly, it is important to understand the true purpose of KPIs. Meaningful KPIs provide objective evidence that shows the extent to which actions and decisions lead to the achievement of organisational goals. At Clear Path, we believe KPIs are about driving continuous improvement, and providing a reference point to gauge the extent to which you are on the right track to meet your objectives. While they are key in driving a high-performing workplace culture, we believe KPIs should not be seen as a tool for judging and punishing staff.

    Below, we will go through some of the most common mistakes we see people make when setting KPIs for their business.

    Mistake 1 – KPIs not specific to your business
    The first mistake relates to how businesses identify the KPIs that they intend to use. Often this is done by compiling a list in a haphazard manner, through brainstorming sessions, searching the net, or by adopting ‘off the shelf’ KPIs that other organisations use. The problem is that these KPIs are generic and not specific to their business and their individual objectives. It does not allow the business to focus on what matters to them, and they are certainly not aligned to their strategy. Additionally, they tend to be meaningless or very difficult to measure and usually include fluffy words such as ‘effective’, ‘improved’, ‘reliable’, ‘efficient’ etc.

    Mistake 2 – Focus on activities not results
    Another critical mistake is to use KPIs that focus on business activities. For example, ‘number of customer interactions’, ‘number of widgets produced’, or ‘hours worked’ are all activity based measures. Why is this a mistake? Because it focuses on tasks rather than results. For KPIs to be truly effective, they must focus on the desired results. This includes short-term objectives as well as long-term strategic goals. Some examples of results a business may want to monitor include ‘customer’s value our products and services’, ‘our people are engaged’, and ‘our customers have great experiences with us’. See how these are focussed on the desired result rather than on activities?

    When we look to develop measures around the results we wish to achieve, it forces us to seriously consider the end-state that we want to reach. This, in turn, makes it easier to determine meaningful measures for those results. Using the above examples, for the result of:

    • “customers value our products and services”, we may consider measuring Net Promoter Score or an organisational reputation measure.
    • “our people are engaged”, we might consider measuring staff satisfaction, or employee turnover rates.
    • “our customers have great experiences with us”, we might consider measuring customer effort or customer journey cycle time.

    Can you see how the measures are focused on the results that we want to achieve? If you want your customers to have a great experience with your organisation, measuring customer effort (the degree of difficulty in dealing with you) and customer journey cycle time (time from placing an order to receiving the product), provides two pieces of objective evidence on this. Obviously, we can then set specific targets for each of these measures.

    Mistake 3 – No buy-in and ownership of KPIs
    We mentioned earlier the difficulty of getting buy-in from management and staff in implementing measures. Staff and stakeholder buy-in is fundamental because without it these people will not use the KPIs to help guide their business decisions and ultimately not be active in helping your business meet its objectives. At Clear Path, we have found the most successful approach is to get key staff involved in determining not just the measures, but also the desired results of the organisation, at all levels. Ultimately this should paint a picture of the organisational day-to-day and strategic objectives across all levels, and allow everyone to see alignment from their day-to-day activities through to the organisation’s high-level strategic purpose. Our experience shows that by getting stakeholders to identify and agree on the desired results, they will accept the KPIs that are identified to measure these same result areas. This is additionally true when staff and management appreciate that the KPIs will not be used as a tool to ‘punish’ them.

    Mistake 4 – Searching for the ‘perfect measure’
    When identifying measures of your key results, the single most important thing to consider is not whether a measure is the ‘perfect measure’ or whether a measure has ‘perfect integrity’. What’s important is whether the measure has enough accuracy and reliability to be trusted as a source of information that will lead to making better decisions than making no decision, or making an uninformed decision. There is simply no such thing as the ‘perfect measure’.

    As we stated earlier, performance measuring is about continuous improvement and focusing on the things that matter. When that becomes embedded in the organisation, it becomes an organisation with a high-performance culture that achieves its goals and objective.


  3. Rapid Benchmarking at New Zealand’s largest company

    March 18, 2018 by ahmed

    Fonterra plant

    Posted by Dr Robin Mann, CEO, COER and BPIR.com

    Have you undertaken an improvement project and not got the breakthrough you were looking for? Or do you recognise the value of benchmarking but are finding it difficult to get your organisation to commit the time and resource to projects? If you have answered yes to either of these questions you should be considering rapid benchmarking.

    This free report, download here, describes how the TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking Methodology has been used for rapid benchmarking by Fonterra, a multinational dairy co-operative and New Zealand’s largest company. TRADE is a benchmarking methodology consisting of 5 stages; Terms of Reference, Research current state, Acquire best practices, Deploy best practices and Evaluate. The methodology is prescriptive in its approach with 5 to 9 steps for each stage of TRADE. The methodology includes a project management system to guide users through a project.

    TRADE best practice benchmarking methodology

    TRADE best practice benchmarking methodology

    Normally the TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking Methodology is used for projects that require a team approach with projects typically taking 2 to 5 months to identify best practices and develop an implementation plan. The term “rapid benchmarking” is used for Fonterra’s approach as Fonterra uses TRADE to identify best practices and develop an implementation plan within 5 days. The report describes how Fonterra organises the 5 days, provides three case studies showing how rapid benchmarking has been used and describes the success factors for rapid benchmarking.

    Fonterra’s rapid benchmarking approach and its relationship with the stages of TRADE

    Fonterra’s rapid benchmarking approach and its relationship with the stages of TRADE

    For case studies on the standard approach to TRADE refer to how it has been applied within the Dubai government. Our free book can be accessed here – Achieving performance excellence through benchmarking and organisational learning – 13 case studies from the 1st cycle of Dubai We Learn’s Excellence Makers Program.


  4. BPIR Newsletter: Best Practice Report – Customer Service Training

    March 15, 2018 by ahmed

     

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    Best Practice Report: Customer Service Training

    This report outlines the best practice research undertaken by BPIR.com in the area of customer service training. The best practices have been compiled under seven main headings. This layout is designed to enable you to scan subjects that are of interest to you and your organisation, quickly assess their importance, and download relevant information for further study or to share with your colleagues.


    Featured Events

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    Reserve these dates: 
    The Global Organisational Excellence Congress,  10-12 December 2018, Abu Dhabi, UAE

    Start planning now to attend the Global Organisational Excellence Congress…

    This is going to be an event that gets you excited with a big WOW!

    The Abu Dhabi International Centre for Organisational Excellence of the Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce & Industry has brought together a number of prestigious international conferences/events into one major event.
    The Congress brings together:


    24th Asia Pacific Quality Organisation International Conference

    • ACE Team Awards Competition 2018
    • 18th Global Performance Excellence Award

    12th International Benchmarking Conference

    • 6th Global Benchmarking Award

    6th International Best Practice Competition

    • 2nd Organisation-wide Innovation Award

    Sheikh Khalifa Excellence Award’s Best Practice Sharing Conference

    Add the Congress to your calendar


    Latest News

    • The Baldrige award-winning university or the runaway elephant?….read more
    • Baldrige program again ranked among best for leadership training….read more
    • Striving for excellence in Nigeria….read more
    • An interview with Professor Mohamed Zairi – A leader in excellence….read more
    • First global assessment on the current state of organizational excellence….read more
    • Key employee engagement strategies for 2018….read more
    • A car dealership that helps other organisations run better….read more
    • The challenges facing Tonga after Cyclone Gita and how business excellence can help….read more

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    Performance Appraisal at an award winning Charter school

    Senior Leadership (SL) Performance Appraisal at the Charter School of San Diego (CSSD), a US Charter School and winner of the 2015 Baldrige National Quality Award, was a three level process. Every other year, the BOD members underwent individual evaluations, facilitated by the President of the Board. The process included a self evaluation form and approval by the board as a whole. The BOD evaluated the CEO. The Chief Business Officer and the Director of Instruction and Innovation were evaluated by the CEO through scorecard results that directly tied to SI achievement. Performance evaluations did not determine executive compensation, which was determined through the Salary Compensation Council and approved by the BOD. Benchmark data, cost of living differentials and levels of responsibility were key determinations for executive compensation. All evaluations served as inputs into the Strategic Planning Process.


    Do you know that in BPIR.com there are more than 200 Best Practice video clips? And increasing…

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    Human Resource Management at a fabrics manufacturer

    The effectiveness of Human Resource Management at Momentum Group a US fabrics manufacturer and winner of the 2016 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award 2016 Award for Small Business, was recognised by being named a “Best Place to Work” by both California’s Orange County Business Journal and Business North Carolin and by the Orange County Register as one of its “Top Workplaces.” Momentum’s strong communications and a focus on action along with high levels of leadership trust and respect supported a “no-blame” philosophy that allowed employees at all levels to take supported intelligent risks. Employee loyalty and retention, average tenure of over 10 years, was achieved through its integrated learning and development and reward and recognition programmes, which encouraged high performance and included annual profit-sharing. Succession planning and job rotations led to 73% of current managers (2016) being promoted from within.

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    BPIR Tip of the Month – Searching performance measures in BPIR.com

    Use BPIR.com to help you to select measures to assess your organisation’s performance. There are around 1200 to choose from, with description and formulae for each measure. Commentaries are also provided for the most commonly used measures. These explain why the measure is important and how to use it.

     


  5. Dubai Health Authority reveals results of Happiness Prescribing Program’s pilot phase

    by ahmed

    Nad-Alhamar-Health-Centre

    One of the ambitious projects of Dubai We Learn initiative is Dubai Health Authority project “Prevention better than Cure”. The aim of the project is to develop & start implementing a Dubai Diabetes prevention framework based on worldwide best practices within one year; to reduce the Pre-Diabetic population from 356,460 adults in 2017 by at least 10% by 2021. The Dubai Health Authority (DHA) revealed the results of the trial phase for the Happiness Prescribing Program during its participation in the UAE Innovation Month 2018.

    The Happiness Prescribing Program was launched by the authority with the aim of identifying and implementing prevention programs among pre-diabetics and persons with high risk factors by not only prescribing medication, but also prescribing nutritional and physical programs.

    Dr Hanan Obaid, Consultant Family Physician and Head of Acute and Chronic Diseases said this program is a pioneering model of community health care for the prevention of diabetes in the Emirate of Dubai. She said that adopting a new approach that does not depend on prescriptions, but goes beyond that to be an integrated behavioral, social and psychological treatment in line with the vision of the UAE and the Dubai plan 2021 and the Dubai Health Authority strategy on Prevention & Healthy lifestyles, and participation in the Dubai Government Excellence Program “Dubai We Learn”.

    The six-month trail phase, which was implemented at Al Barsha and Nad Alhamar Health Centers with the participation of Dubai Ladies Club, Bel Remaitha Club for Men and Sharjah University was conducted on 43 participants of women 25 and men 18.

    Dr Obaid said the specialist doctor offered them a comprehensive health survey and conducted the necessary tests then followed by the nutrition and health education, in addition to the various sports classes and sessions, which were provided for the participants by Dubai Ladies Club, Bel Remaitha Club. Moreover, The University of Sharjah has reviewed and approved this new methodology for the prevention of diabetes.

    “The results found that participants achieved good rates of weight loss ranging from 7 to 11 kg during the past six months, in addition to the risk reduction of diabetes during the next 10 year as follow: 13% risk reduction from severe to intermediate risk & 7% risk reduction from intermediate to low risk in women group. It also has 7% risk reduction from high to moderate risk in men group adding that participants expressed their happiness and satisfaction with this program as diabetes has a negative impact on individuals and society as well as the health sector due to the increase in expenditure for treatment of the disease and its complications,” she said.

    The World International Diabetes Federation (IDF) found that the average expenditure on diabetics in the UAE is estimated at 9.8 billion dirhams annually, and the percentage of diabetic patients in UAE about 17.3% in 2017, which is considered a high percentage compared to other countries. In the Emirate of Dubai, the percentage of people with diabetes was about 15.2% and the percentage of people at risk was 15.8% according to the results of the 2017 Dubai Diabetes Household Survey.

    “The goal of this program is to reduce the incidence of new cases of diabetes in the society of Dubai among the high risk groups who have risk factors such as: overweight and obesity, lack of physical activity, unhealthy food, and family history of diabetes, stress and smoking,” she said.

    The happiness-prescribing program is now electronically connected with the DHA Hayati Application, which will include the evaluation of diabetes at risk and determine the possibility of exposure to diabetes during the next ten years. It will then link it to a new services called Lifestyle clinics, which will be an Innovative solution to prevent diabetes by having a network of a multidisciplinary team (including a doctor, dietitian, health education specialist, and sports clubs).