1. Is Good, Good Enough for You? Taking the Next Step After ISO 9001:2015

    February 14, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

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    Originally posted on Blogrige by Harry Hertz

    Winter 2018-2019
    A recent report entitled Risk-Based Thinking: Creating Opportunities from Strategic Insights by Nicole Radziwill includes references to both the Baldrige Excellence Framework and ISO 9001:2015. The report describes the role of risk-based thinking in ISO 9001:2015. Since risk is based on the systems being impacted, the report recommends starting with an organizational profile, called the organizational context in ISO 9001:2015. In the Baldrige Excellence Framework, the Organizational Profile is “category 0” of the Criteria for Performance Excellence and sets the background (quite literally, as you can see in the framework diagram below) against which all other Baldrige Criteria questions are answered.

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    Reading the report by Radziwill reminded me that beyond the organizational context, there have been other significant changes in ISO 9001 over time that have increased the “kinship” between ISO 9001 as a conformity assessment model and the Baldrige Criteria as a performance excellence framework.

    Below I will describe the similarities and the differences between ISO 9001:2015 and the Baldrige Criteria, and I will conclude with the elements unique to the Baldrige Excellence Framework that are not part of conformity assessment in ISO 9001. I will address the first two topics in the order they are presented in ISO 9001:2015. While my analysis is not exhaustive, I hope it will give you a good sense of the compatibility of the two documents and why your organization, having achieved ISO 9001:2015 certification, will benefit from striving for performance excellence using the Baldrige framework.

    The Similarities Between ISO 9001:2015 and Baldrige
    Both ISO 9001 (as stated in the introduction to the ISO 9001 standard) and Baldrige are focused on the delivery of quality products and services that are acceptable to customers and that meet legal and regulatory requirements. Both documents require a process approach to address their content. Both approaches use quality management principles, stated in the ISO 9001:2015 standard as follows: customer focus (category 3 in Baldrige); leadership (category 1 in Baldrige); engagement of people (category 5 in Baldrige);  process approach (category 6 in Baldrige); improvement (Scoring Guidelines and elsewhere in the Baldrige Criteria); evidence-based decision making (category 4 in Baldrige); and relationship management (the Organizational Profile, as well as categories 1, 3, and 5 in Baldrige).

    RESULTS
    Both approaches have a commitment to results (see Figure 2 in the ISO 9001 standard and category 7 in the Baldrige Criteria). Both approaches use risk-based thinking to improve results and prevent negative effects.

    INTRODUCTION AND DEFINITIONS
    Clauses 1 through 3 of ISO 9001:2015 provide introductory information and a reference to definitions given in ISO 9000:2015. The Baldrige framework provides similar introductory information and its own Glossary of Key Terms.

    ORGANIZATIONAL CONTEXT AND PROCESSES
    Clause 4—and 4.1 of ISO 9001, in particular—is about understanding the context of the organization, including both internal and external issues that are relevant to its current state and strategic direction. The Baldrige Organizational Profile consists of a description of organizational characteristics and the organization’s strategic situation. Clause 4.2 of ISO 9001 requires the identification of interested parties and their requirements. The Baldrige Organizational Profile asks about the requirements and expectations of customers and other key stakeholders, suppliers, partners, and collaborators. Clause 4.4 of ISO 9001 addresses management of organizational processes and use of measurements and performance indicators to control processes. Category 6 of the Baldrige Criteria addresses work processes and operational effectiveness. Item 4.1 (within category 4) of Baldrige addresses measurement, analysis, and improvement of organizational performance.

    LEADERS’ ROLES
    Clause 5.1 of ISO 9001 is Leadership and Commitment. It addresses the leadership’s role with respect to the quality management system and requires compatibility with the organizational context and strategic direction. It includes a responsibility for “engaging, directing and supporting” the people of the organization.The Baldrige Criteria’s category 1 addresses the role of leaders, including senior leaders’ roles in creating “an environment for success now and in the future” and communicating with and engaging the entire workforce.

    CUSTOMER FOCUS
    Clause 5.1.2 of ISO 9001 requires leadership commitment to a customer focus and enhancing customer satisfaction. Item 1.1 (within category 1) of Baldrige asks how senior leaders communicate with and engage key customers. Category 3 addresses listening to the customer and engaging with customers.

    PLANNING
    Clause 6 of ISO 9001 relates to quality management system planning. Strategy, which is category 2 of the Baldrige Criteria, relates to all aspects of organizational planning.

    ORGANIZATIONAL RESOURCES
    Clause 7.1 of ISO 9001 is Resources. It instructs organizations to consider what they obtain from external providers, how they provide the people necessary for effective organizational process performance, and how they provide and maintain a suitable infrastructure, the human and physical environment. 7.1.6, Organizational Knowledge, requires that organizational knowledge be maintained and be made available. Those Clause 7.1 topics are covered in Baldrige categories 5 and 6, Workforce and Operations, respectively. Organizational knowledge is covered in Baldrige item 4.2, Information and Knowledge Management (within category 4).

    Clause 7.2 of ISO 9001 is Competence. It requires the organization to maintain a workforce that is competent to carry out the work of the organization. Baldrige addresses this topic in item 5.1, Workforce Environment (within category 5), asking about workforce capability and capacity. Having capability and capacity ensures that the workforce is competent to carry out the work of the organization and that there are sufficient staff members available.

    OPERATIONS
    Clause 8 of ISO 9001 is Operations and has significant overlap with Baldrige category 6, also entitled Operations.

    CUSTOMER COMMUNICATION
    In Clause 8.2.1, ISO addresses Customer Communication. Baldrige addresses this in the overall focus on customers, which is the subject of category 3.

    PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
    Clause 9 of ISO 9001 is Performance Evaluation. It requires evaluation of operational performance and customer satisfaction. It also has a specific clause, 9.3, on management review of the quality management system. Baldrige Criteria item 4.1b is Performance Analysis and Review (within category 4). Baldrige has a separate area to address, 3.2b, on Determination of Customer Satisfaction and Engagement (within category 3). In Baldrige Criteria item 1.1, Senior Leadership (within category 1), there is a responsibility to create a focus on action based on identifying needed actions to improve organizational performance. Leaders must demonstrate personal accountability for those actions.

    IMPROVEMENT
    Clause 10 of ISO 9001, Improvement, addresses nonconformity, corrective action, and continual improvement. It states that improvement can include innovation. The Baldrige Criteria ask specifically about product and process improvement in 6.1b(3). Within category 4, 4.1c focuses on future performance, looking at use of performance review findings as a source of continuous improvement and opportunities for innovation. The Baldrige Scoring System is a rubric for organizational maturity in performance improvement.

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    The Differences Between ISO 9001:2015 and Baldrige
    Now let’s focus on some key differences between ISO 9001:2015 and the Baldrige Criteria that can move an organization from conformity to striving for excellence. To begin, it is important to remember that the two documents are written with significantly different purposes in mind.

    ISO 9001: 2015 is a standard for “consistently providing products and services that meet customer and applicable statutory and regulatory requirements, facilitating opportunities to enhance customer satisfaction,” and “addressing risks and opportunities.” This is all done in the context of delivering a product or service in conformance with quality management system requirements.

    In contrast, the Baldrige Excellence Framework is designed to help all organizations improve and get ever-improving results. The Baldrige framework helps any organization answer three questions:

    • Is your organization doing as well as it could?
    • How do you know?
    • What and how should your organization improve or change?

    The end goal is organizational excellence, which is recognized in the United States by a Presidential Award (the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award) that designates the organization as a role model for the nation (and beyond).

    While the purposes of ISO 9001 and Baldrige are different, it is particularly valuable that the two approaches to organizational performance are so compatible, allowing a smooth transition from conformity assessment and certification to overall organizational performance assessment and a continuing journey to performance excellence.

    Focus on Transition from Conformance to Excellence
    Now let’s focus on aspects of the Baldrige Criteria that move an organization from requirements that address conformity to questions that address the journey toward excellence. I will address each of the clauses of ISO 9001:2015 in the order covered above, starting with some additional comments relative to the introductory material in both documents (the Introduction and Clauses 1—3 of ISO 9001:2015).

    A Focus on INNOVATION
    ISO 9001:2015 requires corrective actions and continual improvement to “consistently meet requirements and address future needs and expectations.” It states that future needs might require breakthrough change and innovation. Baldrige adds a specific focus on innovation, at numerous places in the Criteria. The multiple references emphasize the systems perspective for organizational performance innovation. Item 1.1 (within category 1) asks how senior leaders create an environment for innovation and intelligent risk taking (more on risk in the next section). Within category 6, 6.1d asks about work processes for innovation management, specifically how you pursue opportunities for innovation. The Baldrige Scoring Guidelines (the scoring rubric for a Baldrige assessment) specifically reference organizational learning through innovation in the highest scoring ranges.

    A Focus on CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENT
    ISO 9001 promotes a process approach “to enhance customer satisfaction by meeting customer requirements.” While Baldrige asks questions about customer satisfaction and dissatisfaction, it is focused on customer engagement for the long term, to build a relationship with the customer, exceed customers’ expectations, and increase their engagement with your organization over time (category 3).

    A Focus on STRATEGIC CONTEXT
    Clause 4 of ISO 9001 and the Organizational Profile of the Baldrige Criteria both look at organizational context. Baldrige specifically asks about the organization’s mission, vision, and values, as well as the organization’s core competencies (not just those required of individual staff members). These concepts are strategic and form the basis, together with articulated strategic advantages and strategic challenges, for overall organizational strategic planning. Baldrige also asks about changes affecting your competitive position and how these changes might create opportunities for innovation and collaboration.

    A Focus on the HOLISTIC ROLE OF SENIOR LEADERS
    Clause 5.1 of ISO 9001 is about organizational leadership. The Baldrige Criteria item 1.1, Senior Leadership, adds the senior leaders’ role in setting and deploying the organization’s vision and values throughout the organization and to key stakeholders. These values are critical guides for norms of behavior and setting organizational culture. Senior leaders are also questioned about their roles in organizational and employee personal learning and leadership succession planning, including development of future organizational leaders. Thus, in the Baldrige Criteria, senior leaders are responsible not only for guiding the organization today, but for creating the environment for success in the future.

    A Focus on ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGY
    Clause 6 of ISO 9001 addresses Quality Objectives and Planning to Achieve Them. The Baldrige Criteria category 2, Strategy, addresses strategy broadly. Quality planning can be delegated to a quality function in the organization. Strategic planning starts with the senior leadership and cascades throughout the organization, including the quality planning function. Category 2 asks about the specifics of the strategy development process, your key strategic objectives, how your strategy development process stimulates innovation, and also about your work systems and core competencies. Work systems are a key strategic concept.

    In determining your work systems and related core competencies, the organization is deciding what will be accomplished with your workforce, using competencies core to the organization’s success; and what will be accomplished through suppliers, partners, and collaborators. This decision involves important considerations related to protecting intellectual property and brand, as well as the actual footprint of your operations. The Baldrige Criteria also ask about your translation of strategic objectives into action plans and workforce plans and measures to track progress on action plans. Additionally, Baldrige asks about your process for being agile, should conditions warrant a rapid change in plans.

    A Focus on the WORKFORCE
    As Clause 7.1 of ISO 9001 indicates there are numerous aspects to resources. People aspects are treated in 7.1.2 and 7.1.4. People and Environment for the Operation of Processes, respectively. Category 5 in the Baldrige Criteria, Workforce, views people as both a valuable resource and as the internal customers of the organization, recognizing that an engaged workforce leads to a more successful organization. Given this understanding, Baldrige asks about drivers of workforce engagement and how your organization supports its workforce through benefits, compensation, reward, and recognition. Baldrige also asks about how you accomplish workforce development, learning, and career progression, as well as how you ensure workplace health, safety, and accessibility.

    A Focus on ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING
    Clause 7.1.6 of ISO 9001 is about capturing organizational knowledge for the purpose of “operation of its processes and to achieve conformity of products and services.” Within category 4, the Baldrige Criteria item 4.2 is Information and Knowledge Management. It additionally asks about blending and correlating data from different sources to build new knowledge. It asks about mining and sharing best practices throughout the organization, and it asks how you embed learning in the way your organization operates.

    A Focus on CUSTOMER COMMUNICATION TO BUILD LONG-TERM COMMITMENT
    Clause 8.2.1 of ISO 9001 is Customer Communication. Within the Baldrige Criteria category 3, 3.1a, Customer Listening, asks how your organization listens to potential customers to obtain actionable information. Also within category 3, Baldrige asks at 3.2b, Determination of Customer Satisfaction and Engagement, how you determine your customers’ satisfaction with your organization relative to competitors and other organizations.

    A Focus on ALL ASPECTS OF ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
    Clause 9 of ISO 9001 is Performance Evaluation, covering all aspects of the quality management system. Within category 4, item 4.1 in the Baldrige Criteria is Measurement, Analysis, and Improvement of Organizational Performance. The Baldrige focus is on all aspects of organizational performance, including the quality system. Baldrige also asks how you use comparative data to support decision making. It asks how you assess organizational success, competitive performance, financial health, and progress on achieving your strategic objectives and action plans.

    A Focus on the EVER-IMPROVING ORGANIZATION
    Clause 10 of ISO 9001 is Improvement. The Baldrige Scoring System allows assessment of organizational performance maturity on a 1,000-point scale There are separate rubrics for Baldrige assessment of process and results. Process is assessed on organizational improvements in approach (the method used to carry out a process), deployment (the extent to which your organization applies the approach), learning (the refinement of your approach through cycles of improvement and through innovation), and integration (the extent of harmonization of your approach, plans, results, and analyses across processes and work units). Results are assessed on organizational improvement in the dimensions of levels (current performance), trends (rate of performance improvement), comparisons (performance relative to other appropriate organizations), and integration.

    Elements Unique to Baldrige
    Numerous areas associated with overall organizational excellence that are not part of product and process conformity are, nonetheless, critical to overall organizational performance and to achieving performance excellence. Following is a brief description of each of these areas covered in the Baldrige Excellence Framework:

    • Ethics: How your organization and its leaders demonstrate and monitor ethical performance and ensure transparency in operations.
    • Governance: How your organization achieves responsible governance through oversight of senior leaders’ performance and operations.
    • Societal Contributions: Beyond legal compliance, how your organization supports and strengthens communities served.
    • Security and Cybersecurity: How your organization ensures the security and cybersecurity of sensitive or privileged data and information.
    • Risk: Since organizations can no longer avoid risk, risk management has been significantly incorporated into ISO 9001:2015. Risk is also addressed by the Baldrige Criteria, from the perspective of taking intelligent risks. Intelligent risks are seen as opportunities for which the potential gain outweighs the potential harm or loss to your organization’s future success if you do not explore them. Risk is frequently viewed from only the harm perspective, but Baldrige also sees intelligent risk as arising from opportunities for innovation.
      Results: In addition to your organization’s performance results in the areas of product and process performance and customers (as needed to demonstrate conformity for ISO 9001:2015), Baldrige assesses workforce results, leadership and governance results, and financial and market results.

    Encouragement
    I have not shared all the commonalities of or differences between ISO 9001:2015 and the Baldrige Excellence Framework. Instead, I have tried to show the organizational possibilities of building on conformity assessment to establish a holistic approach for achieving excellence in every dimension of organizational performance today, with a look to the strategic imperatives and opportunities for the future. Baldrige helps an organization take this journey with a focus on process (55% of the scoring rubric) and results (45% of the rubric), recognizing that great processes are only valuable if they yield the complete set of results that lead to organizational sustainability.

    I encourage organizations that have not gone beyond conformity to take the next step in securing your future. Start with downloading the free Baldrige Excellence Builder, an abbreviated version of the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence. I hope that your organization, like many others, will look back in future years wondering why you didn’t start the journey to excellence earlier!


  2. James Harrington’s Latest Book Series on Innovation Now Available at Taylor & Francis

    February 1, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited
    James Harrington’s latest books on innovation are now available at taylorandfrancis.com. The latest series from Harrington covers a range of current topics of debate in the area of innovation management for performance improvement. Acquiring and utilizing knowledge is the key for being innovative. However, many organisations that are enthusiastic to become excellent do not really know how to initiate their journey of innovation towards becoming excellent. The latest book series from James Harrington is a fantastic point of reference. The books provide guidelines and frameworks for innovation and process improvement. 20% discount is available on these books on placing order for copies on http://pages.email.taylorandfrancis.com/review-copy-request.

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    James Harrington is a prolific author having published hundreds of technical reports and magazine articles in addition to having authored 50 books. He is regarded as the father of Business Process Improvement methodology. The publications of Harrington are considered highly respectable and credible a living proof of which is that his books and reports are used by quality management consultants around the world. Harrington is serving as Chief Executive Officer for the Harrington Management Systems that has branches around the world. In addition to that, he is adding value to a number of other associations around the world: –

    • President of the Walter L. Hurd Foundation
    • Honorary Advisor for Quality for China
    • Chairman of the Centre for Organizational Excellence Research (COER)
    • President and Chairman of the American Society for Quality
    • President and Chairman of the International Association for Quality
    • He serves on the Board of Directors for a number of small to medium size companies

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    The book “Creativity, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship – The Only Way to Renew Your Organization” describes the ways through which creative solutions may be harnessed from within the members of an organisation. Harrington argues that creativity gets compromised with time as organisational members are trained and cultured. However, the difficult task of fostering a culture of innovation in any organisation may still be achieved as described in this book.

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    The second book in the series titled “Innovative Change Management (ICM) – Preparing Your Organization for the New Innovative Culture” is a guide to homogenous improvements in performance and culture. The book serves as a step-by-step guide for how to tie together project change management, cultural change management and project management concepts with innovation change management to create an effective and innovative organisation. This book is ideal for practically managing change in complex processes like process redesign and supply chain through integration of change management in strategic plans of the organisation.

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    The third book in the series titled “Project Management for Performance Improvement Teams” is a guide for applied team performance enhancement. The book addresses the performance improvement teams and their project managers. Efficiency is the key for modern day teams in terms of both shrinking budgets and deadlines, this book guides project managers and performance enhancement teams to adopt a proven performance enhancement framework in order to complete projects successfully.

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    The fourth book of the series “The Framework for Innovation – A Guide to the Body of Innovation Knowledge” focuses on compiling the body of knowledge on the subject of innovation and innovative practices for product strategy, marketing, R&D, development, and commercialization functions. This book is particularly useful for the top level management as it discusses the strategic use of innovation thus developing systematic corporate innovation. The book relates with the practices of organisations through examples and illustrations of innovation and measurement tools, techniques and metric.

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    To avail the 20% discount on these books, order your copies from the Taylor & Francis website only at http://pages.email.taylorandfrancis.com/review-copy-request.

  3. BPIR.com Newsletter: January 2019

    January 31, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

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    Best Practice Report: Business Excellence

    Business excellence means the development and strengthening of all facets of a company or organisation to improve performance and create value for its stakeholders. It can be seen best when an organisation has and demonstrates world-class strategies, processes, and stakeholder-related performance results. Business excellence can be validated through assessments using proven business excellence models (BEMs), which are based on a set of fundamental concepts or values. These BEMs continue to evolve thanks to extensive studies of the practices and values of the world’s highest-performing organisations.

     

    Featured Events

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    NZBEF Conference, Auckland, New Zealand, 19-20 Mar 2019

    Come and join us at this two-day conference where we will celebrate all things to do with performance excellence, business excellence, continuous improvement, and measurement.


    Learn how to take your organisation to the next level by increasing your organisational performance with a strong focus on your leadership, strategy, customers, measurement, analysis & knowledge management, workforce, operations, and results.

    We have a great line-up of local and international speakers. The conference will be held at the Waipuna Hotel & Conference Centre, Mt Wellington, Auckland. You can register for the conference here and more NZBEF Conference information can be found at the conference website here. Please share details of the conference with others as we want a good turnout.

     

    Jollibee Foods Corporation (Philippines) Win the 6 th International Best Practice Competition

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    The 6th International Best Practice Competition was held in Abu Dhabi, UAE, 10-12 December 2018 as part of the Global Organisational Excellence Congress. The Congress, attended by 1,300 delegates, was hosted by the Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry and supported by key partners, the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research, Asia Pacific Quality Organisation and the Global Benchmarking Network.

    From 72 entries from 17 countries, 36 best practices from 31 organisations were presented to the audience and a judging panel through 8-minute presentations followed by 4 minutes of questions and answers. From these the top 10 were selected, and then the top 5 qualified to the final and gave presentations to another set of judges.

     

    Dubai Customs Wins the 2nd Organisation-Wide Innovation Award

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    The   2nd Organisation-Wide Innovation Award was held in Abu Dhabi, UAE, 10-12 December 2018 as part of the Global Organisational Excellence Congress. The Congress, attended by 1,300 delegates, was hosted by the Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry and supported by key partners, the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER), Asia Pacific Quality Organisation and the Global Benchmarking Network.  Six organisations qualified for the final of the Organisation-Wide Innovation award.

     

    Road and Transport Authority (Dubai, UAE) Wins the 6th Global Benchmarking Award

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    The Global Benchmarking Network’s 6th Global Benchmarking Award was held in Abu Dhabi, UAE, 10-12 December 2018 as part of the Global Organisational Excellence Congress. The Congress, attended by 1,300 delegates, was hosted by the Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry and supported by key partners, the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research, Asia Pacific Quality Organisation and the GBN.

    Six organisations qualified for the final of the Global Benchmarking Award.

     

    Latest News

    • Baldrige Award Winners 2018…. read more
    • Keep on learning…. read more
    • The Baldrige criteria are insufficient…. read more
    • Best Practice Report: Benchmarking…. read more
    • Learning from Role Models: Category 6: Operations…. read more
    • EFQM Excellence Award Winners 2018…. read more

     

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    Impact of the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence at a US university


    Since winning the 2001 Baldrige Award the University of Wisconsin-Stout continued to use the Baldrige Excellence Framework. In recent years the university: 1) started an informal Baldrige team with membership open to the entire campus. The team met several times a year to discuss ways in which they were following the Baldrige Criteria and addressed improvement opportunities. 2) Teams were sent to Baldrige professional development offerings, to Baldrige regional conferences and occasionally to the Quest for Excellence® Conference.  3) a Baldrige-based approach was used to meet regional accreditation requirements through the Higher Learning Commission (HLC). 4) the Baldrige framework helped the university to focus on the small number of metrics that were most important to success and that aligned with the strategic plan. The university had a comprehensive review in March 2016 and the review team leader said it was the best portfolio he had ever seen.

     

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    Employee engagement initiative pays divcidends


    Redundancies and leadership changes at Alcoa Power and Propulsion, a UK manufacturer, led to changed perceptions from employees and externally and Engagement survey returns dropped significantly. A decision was made to rebuild Alcoa’s ’employer of choice’ status from the ground up, with the managers and supervisors leading the change. Managers undertook personal development to stretch and challenge their leadership; A suggestion scheme was introduced; Community initiatives targeted postcodes where employees lived were reintroduced with wellbeing initiatives like a SunSafe campaign, smoking cessation programme and cycling proficiency training for employee’s children. The results were impressive: Staff turnover reduced from 22% in 2010, to less than 1% in 2013, on-time delivery increased from 46.7% in 2009 to 96%, and labour productivity increased by 10% year on year. Alcoa won the CIPD People Management “best employee engagement initiative” award in 2013 and the Large Employer of the Year in the South West region Award at the National Apprentice Awards 2014.

    Do you know that in BPIR.com users can navigate the databases through four business excellence models?

    BPIR Tip of the Month – Business Excellence Models

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    This area of the web-site allows users to navigate the databases through a choice of business excellence models (Malcolm Baldrige Model, EFQM Excellence Model, Singapore Quality Award Model, Canadian Framework for Business Excellence, and an overview generic model). Navigation via the models can be used to look at specific categories that correspond to areas within their organisation that have been identified as in need of improvement, or to specific areas of personal interest. Using the model categories to navigate will quickly and effectively lead the user to the information we have researched so far in relation to the areas in question.

     

                              


  4. Reflecting on the success of the Global Organisational Excellence Congress

    January 23, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

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    The Global Organisational Excellence Congress 2018 was held in Abu Dhabi between 10th-12th December 2018. The congress was organized by the Abu Dhabi International Centre for Organisational Excellence (of the Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry), Asia Pacific Quality Organisation (APQO), Global Benchmarking Network (GBN) and the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER) (developers of the BPIR.com best practice resource).

    His Excellency Mohamed Helal Al Mheiri, Director-General of Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry provided the opening address at the Global Organisational Excellence Congress.

    His Excellency Mohamed Helal Al Mheiri, Director-General of Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry provided the opening address at the Global Organisational Excellence Congress.

    The congress was attended by delegates and speakers from all corners of the world from as far away as Chile, New Zealand and Tonga. In total there were 1300 registrations with almost 40% being international delegates representing 34 countries, therefore offering a platform for global networking. Notable speakers and authors included Dr. H. James Harrington, CEO, Harrington Management Systems, USA (author of over 40 books covering all aspects of quality management and still going strong at 90 years old with his recent work on innovation) and Dr. Robert Camp, Honorary Life-time President, Global Benchmarking Network, United States (the pioneer of modern day benchmarking through his work at Xerox and publishing the first book on benchmarking in 1989, “Benchmarking: The Search for Industry Best Practices”).

    Dr. H. James Harrington, CEO, Harrington Management Systems, USA delivered a keynote presentation on Total Innovation Management for Excellence and served as a judge for COER’s Organisation-wide Innovation Award

    Dr. H. James Harrington, CEO, Harrington Management Systems, USA delivered a keynote presentation on Total Innovation Management for Excellence and served as a judge for COER’s Organisation-wide Innovation Award

    Prior to the congress on the 9th December 2018, the Global Benchmarking Network’s Annual General Meeting and Asia Pacific Quality Organisation’s Annual General Meeting were held. These meetings brought together international experts from over 30 countries to discuss and shape the future of quality and benchmarking. One of the key decisions of the GBN was to open up its membership to individuals and corporates, for further information refer to https://www.globalbenchmarking.org/index.php/membership-join/

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    Attendees of the APQO’s Annual General Meeting with the local organizing committee of the Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry, including Deputy Director General Abdullah Al-Qubaisi.

    Attendees of the GBN’s Annual General Meeting with the local organizing committee of the Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry, including Deputy Director General Abdullah Al-Qubaisi.

    Attendees of the GBN’s Annual General Meeting with the local organizing committee of the Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry, including Deputy Director General Abdullah Al-Qubaisi.

    The main congress event was enriched with keynote speeches from notable authors and professionals such as Prof. Dr.-Ing. Holger Kohl, Director Corporate Management, Fraunhofer IPK, Germany, Dr. Charles Aubrey, Chairman, APQO International Advisory Panel, United States and Professor Tony Bendell, MD, Services Limited, UK to name a few. The speakers and their presentations can be found on the congress website.

    Professor Hadi Eltigani, Chairman of the Congress and Coordinator General of Sheikh Khalifa Excellence Award (SKEA) was instrumental in bringing such a prestigious event to Abu Dhabi. It was his relationship with COER, the Global Benchmarking Network and Asia Pacific Quality Organisation that led to the idea of integrating multiple conferences into one event.

    Professor Hadi Eltigani spoke about Building Excellence in the UAE and the Middle East and Harnek Singh, President, APQO, provided an overview of the history, development and choice of Abu Dhabi, UAE for the congress.

    Professor Hadi Eltigani spoke about Building Excellence in the UAE and the Middle East and Harnek Singh, President, APQO, provided an overview of the history, development and choice of Abu Dhabi, UAE for the congress.

    Dr. Robin Mann, Director, Centre for Organisational Excellence Research, New Zealand and co-organizer of the congress chaired the Business Excellence Administrator’s Panel Discussion – The Role of Excellence Models in Nation Building. On the panel were Russell Longmuir, CEO, EFQM, Patrick Lim, Director, Business & Service Excellence, Enterprise Singapore, Jeff Ryall, Chair, Australian Organization Quality representing Business Excellence Australia, Areej Al Hamiri, Manager Government Excellence Department, General Secretariat of the Executive Council, Abu Dhabi, Dr Zeyad El Kahlout, Senior Consultant, Dubai Government Excellence Program, Professor Hadi El Tigani, Coordinator General of the Sheikh Khalifa Excellence Award, Dr. Ibrahim Alrawabdeh, CEO, King Abdallah Centre for Excellence, Jordan and Suresh Lulla, Chairman, IMC Ramkrishna Bajaj National Quality Award, India.

    Dr. Robin Mann moderated the Business Excellence Administrator’s Panel Discussion – The Role of Excellence Models in Nation Building (all the panelists shown in the picture)

    Dr. Robin Mann moderated the Business Excellence Administrator’s Panel Discussion – The Role of Excellence Models in Nation Building (all the panelists shown in the picture)

    The panel discussed how nations encourage business excellence and how important it is for the leadership of a nation to understand and use business excellence principles, models and awards to drive desired organizational behavior and performance. A classic example of a national approach to excellence is the United Arab Emirates, which shows a strong and consistent drive from the leadership towards excellence within both government institutions and the private sector.

    In the next session of presentations Saad Ghafoor, COER PhD student, presented his research, called “Excellence Without Borders”, investigating how countries are promoting business excellence, engaging with and assisting organisations on their excellence journey, and how organisations are recognized as role models of excellence. Saad’s research has over 30 countries participating from 55 countries that are known to have business excellence awards. The research has the support of the Global Excellence Model Council and its key findings will be released by the middle of 2019 (currently he is interviewing the administrators of the major awards programs).

    Saad Ghafoor, PhD Student, COER (left photo), presented on his research “Excellence Without Borders” investigating how 30+ countries pursue business excellence and Ahmed Abbas, Senior Researcher BPIR.com, COER (right photo) presented on “TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking & Dubai Government Excellence Program’s Dubai We Learn”

    Saad Ghafoor, PhD Student, COER (left photo), presented on his research "Excellence Without Borders" investigating how 30+ countries pursue business excellence and Ahmed Abbas, Senior Researcher BPIR.com, COER (right photo) presented on "TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking & Dubai Government Excellence Program’s Dubai We Learn"

    Another one of COER’s staff, Ahmed Abbas, presented on COER’s work facilitating 11 benchmarking projects for the Dubai Government Excellence Program in 2017 to 2018. The projects were very successful and have saved or generated millions of AED through waste reduction, new innovations and productivity gains. A book will soon be published sharing the findings from these projects or you can view a book on the previous year’s projects here. A 3rd Cycle of Dubai We Learn projects will begin in 2019. Ahmed also talked about how the BPIR.com supported the benchmarking projects with its 1000’s of best practice case studies and how the BPIR.com is evolving with a new website to be launched soon. Ahmed showcased BPIR.com’s latest best practice reports on benchmarking and business excellence.

    The 6th International Best Practices Competition was held as part of the congress. Out of a total of 72 entries received, 36 were shortlisted to deliver a presentation representing 31 organisations from 17 countries. The contenders were judged by a panel on the basis of their written application and an 8-minute presentation followed by 4 minutes of questions and answers. From these, the top 10 were selected and the top 5 proceeded to the final where they presented again in front of a new panel of judges. All the participants were appreciated with participation certificates.

    Contenders delivered their presentations in 5 sessions, with the top 5 delivering their presentation again to a 2nd set of judges (panel of judges and audience shown in the pictures)

    Contenders delivered their presentations in 5 sessions, with the top 5 delivering their presentation again to a 2nd set of judges (panel of judges and audience shown in the pictures)

    The winner of the award was Jollibee Foods Corporation, Philippines (We Listen and Learn from the Voices of our Customers to Spread Joy to the World). The runners-up of equal standing were Dubai Police, UAE (Productivity and Vehicle Availability within Vehicle Fleet Maintenance), Arya Sasol Polymer Company, Iran (Sustainable Continuous Development of Safety Improvement Plan), Dubai Electricity Water Authority, UAE (AFKARI Ideation Management System) and Abu Dhabi City Municipality, UAE (Building Data Management System for streamlining Building Data Delivery process and extracting Indoor details).

    The winner of the International Best Practice Competition, Jollibee Food Corporation. Also, in the photo are the judging panel and Abu Dhabi Chamber’s Director General Mohamed Helal Al Mheiri, & Congress Chairman, Professor Hadi Eltigani & Dr Robin Mann, the founder of IBPC

    The winner of the International Best Practice Competition, Jollibee Food Corporation. Also, in the photo are the judging panel and Abu Dhabi Chamber’s Director General Mohamed Helal Al Mheiri, & Congress Chairman, Professor Hadi Eltigani & Dr Robin Mann, the founder of IBPC

    Dubai Customs, UAE were the winner of the 2nd Organisation Wide Innovation Award. The runners-up of equal standing were the Abu Dhabi Health Services Company, UAE, Securities and Commodities Authority, UAE, Sport Star Academy, Australia, United Overseas Bank, Singapore and Dubai Municipality, UAE.

    The winner of the Organisation-Wide Innovation Award, Dubai Customs. Also, in the photo are the runners-up and judging panel.

    The winner of the Organisation-Wide Innovation Award, Dubai Customs. Also, in the photo are the runners-up and judging panel.

    The Road and Transport Authority, UAE won the 6th Global Benchmarking Award for its benchmarking approach. The runners-up of equal standing were Dubai Courts, UAE, Yanbu Refinery Department, Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia, Dubai Police, UAE, Bahrain Polytechnic, Bahrain and Dubai Electricity and Water Authority, UAE.

    The winner of the GBN’s Global Benchmarking Award, Road and Transport Authority. Also, in the photo are the runners-up and the judging panel.

    The winner of the GBN’s Global Benchmarking Award, Road and Transport Authority. Also, in the photo are the runners-up and the judging panel.

    On the 2nd evening of the Congress the Gala Dinner was held, this event celebrated the achievements of the winners of the APQO’s Global Performance Excellence Award (organisations that had won national awards for excellence), winners of the ACE Team Competition and those people that had received special recognition from the APQO (winners are shown at the end of this article). The organisations that received Global Performance Excellence recognition were:

    • Weichai Power Co., Ltd, China
    • Gmr Warora Energy Limited, India
    • Tata Power Solar Systems Ltd, India
    • Global Indian International School, Queenstown Campus Singapore, India
    • Pt Pupuk Kalimantan Timur, Indonesia
    • Finisar Malaysia Sdn Bhd, Malaysia
    • Comision Federal De Electricidad Division De Distribucion Norte, Mexico
    • Sp Services Ltd, Singapore
    • Johor Port Berhad, Malaysia
    • Maliban Biscuit Manufactories (Pvt.) Ltd, Sri Lanka
    • Binh Minh Plastics Joint-Stock Company, Vietnam
    • Unon National Bank, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
    • State Grid Shanghai Municipal Electric Power Company, China
    • Preparatoria 16 De La Universidad Autonoma Denuevo Leon, Mexico

    The Gala dinner was a truly impressive occasion with great entertainment, delicious food and beautiful stage lighting.

    Enchanting operatic performance with beautiful stage lighting.

    Enchanting operatic performance with beautiful stage lighting.

    The Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry provided all the attendees with a fabulous gala dinner on the 11th December 2018

    The Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry provided all the attendees with a fabulous gala dinner on the 11th December 2018

    Following the congress, Dr Robin Mann conducted a 2-day TRADE Benchmarking Certification Course on the 13th and 14th December 2018. The training was appropriately timed as a number of the finalists of the various competitions had used TRADE as a key mechanism to improve their overall benchmarking approach (for instance, RTA the Global Benchmarking Award Winner) or used TRADE to identify and implement best practices (DEWA and Dubai Police both reached the top 5 of the International Best Practice Competition for their best practices). The training was attended by employees from a number of government and private organisations from India and the United Arab Emirates.

    Dr. Robin Mann, COER, provided a 2-day TRADE Benchmarking Certification Course

    Dr. Robin Mann, COER, provided a 2-day TRADE Benchmarking Certification Course

    The TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking Methodology

    The TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking Methodology

    Over the last 20 years COER has been involved in organizing 16 international conferences. This one in Abu Dhabi will stay in our memory for a long time – it stands out as very special in so many ways. The support of the Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce & Industry was limitless and particular praise needs to be given to Wigdan Salih who was responsible for the day to day work to take the plans to reality, the combining of four major events into one congress was a masterstroke ensuring that the congress catered for everyone’s needs as there were three or four streams of presentations to choose from at anyone time, the expert presentations were excellent delivering plenty of learning opportunities, the quality of the competitions and the presentations from the participants were outstanding and provided a vibrant atmosphere for best practice sharing, the expertise of the judges and their pertinent questions led to the selection of role model competition winners, the quality of the chairing of the sessions meant that the congress kept to the time schedule, hosting the congress at the Jumeriah at Etihad Towers was an inspired choice with the Gala Dinner being exceptional and finally, hosting the event in Abu Dhabi and the UAE where there is such a thirst and desire for excellence led to 1,300 registrations and plenty of opportunities for networking with like-minded people.

    Dr. Robin Mann, COER, relaxing with Dr James Harrington and Jan-Patrick Cap, Secretariat Global Benchmarking Network.

    Dr. Robin Mann, COER, relaxing with Dr James Harrington and Jan-Patrick Cap, Secretariat Global Benchmarking Network.

    APQO individual awards were given to the following:

    • APQO Award for Senior Leadership Commitment to Quality 2018 – H. E. Mohammed Helal Al-Mheiri, Director General, Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce and Industry, United Arab Emirates
    • APQO Award for Senior Leadership Commitment to Quality 2018 – XuGuang Tan, Chairman of Board, Weichai Power Co. Ltd, China
    • APQO Award for Women in Quality Leadership 2018 – Yap Suan See, Vice President / Managing Director, Finisar Malaysia Sdn, Bhd, Malaysia
    • APQO Harrington / Ishikawa Quality Professional Award 2018 – H. E. Major-General Abdullah Khalifa Al Marri, Commander in Chief, Dubai Police, United Arab Emirates
    • APQO Harrington / Ishikawa Quality Professional Award 2018 – Prof. Dr Pal Molnar, President and CEO of HNC for EOQ, Chair of International Academy for Quality,
    • APQO President’s Award for Demonstrated Excellence 2018 – Prof Hadi Eltigani, Coordinator General Sheikh Khalifa Excellence Award, UAE
    • APQO President’s Award for Demonstrated Excellence 2018, Ab Rahim Yusoff, Deputy Director General, Malaysia Productivity Corporation, Malaysia
    • APQO Special Recognition 2018, Wigdan Farouk Salih, Organizational Incentives and Programs Consultant Organizational Training Incentives and Programs Department ADCCI
    • APQO Special Recognition 2018, Mangalika de Silva, Vice President Administration APQO / Secretary APQO
    • APQO Special Recognition 2018, Corazon Tan, Vice President, Finance, APQO / Treasurer APQO
    • APQO Lifetime Achievement Award 2018, Dr H. James Harrington, APQO Official Advisor Life

    For further information on COER’s work view www.coer.org.nz or contact Dr Robin Mann, r.s.mann@massey.ac/nz, https://www.linkedin.com/in/drrobinmann. Support COER’s research by joining the BPIR.com.


  5. Best Practice Report: Business Excellence 2

    January 12, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

    Business excellence means the development and strengthening of all facets of a company or organisation to improve performance and create value for its stakeholders. It can be seen best when an organisation has and demonstrates world-class strategies, processes, and stakeholder-related performance results. Business excellence can be validated through assessments using proven business excellence models (BEMs), which are based on a set of fundamental concepts or values.
    These BEMs continue to evolve thanks to extensive studies of the practices and values of the world’s highest-performing organisations.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    In This Report:

    1. What is business excellence?
    2. Which organisations have received recognition for business excellence?
    3. How have organisations reached high levels of success in business excellence?
    4. What research has been undertaken into business excellence?
    5. What tools and methods are used to achieve high levels of success in business excellence?
    6. How can business excellence be measured?
    7. What do business leaders say about business excellence?
    8. Conclusion

    Access the report from here. At the bottom of the page is a PDF version of the report for easy reading. If you are a non-member, you will find some of the links in this report do not work. To join BPIR.com and support our research simply click here or to find out more about membership, email membership@bpir.com. BPIR.com publishes a new best practice every month with over 80 available to members.