1. Leadership Practices of Memorial Hospital and Health Care Center

    May 15, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

    Article originally posted on Blogrige by Dawn Bailey

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    Five-Part Leadership Blog Series
    In this five-part blog series on the 2018 Baldrige Award recipients’ leadership presentations at the 31st Annual Quest for Excellence® Conference (April 7–10, 2019), senior leaders of the five newest national role models share best practices and stories of how they achieved excellence.

    Addressing the Critical Care Shortage

    To relieve the critical shortage of beds in its rural Indiana area, Memorial Hospital opened its doors in 1951 for patients across eight counties. The Little Company of Mary Sisters set the direction in how the hospital cares for patients and each other, following the mission: “Christ’s healing mission of compassion empowers us to be for others through quality and excellence.”
     
    Now recognized nationally as a top regional hospital, Memorial Hospital and Health Care Center offers 137 patient beds and employs more than 1,700 staff members, with 100 physicians as active medical staff. Memorial also has 32 medical offices strategically located in its service area, annually providing care to 6,500 inpatients; 260,000 outpatients; 3,000 emergency patients; and 1,000 newborns.

    Developing Relationships
    According to Kyle Bennett, president and CEO, two constants have helped the hospital reach role-model status: the commitment and support of the Little Company of Mary Sisters and community support.

    “In order to bring care closer to where we are, we develop relationships,” said Bennett, speaking proudly of Memorial’s many collaborations, including opening a clinic in an Amish community, developing a tele-stroke inpatient program in collaboration with the University of Louisville, and partnering with the Indiana University School of Medicine to develop a family medicine residency program to open in summer 2019.

    Because of this program, “the access to primary care [will change] for many years into the future for our service area,” he said.

    Adopting Baldrige to “Be the Provider that We Needed to Be”
    “Employers and the business community look to us to be a strong health care provider, and we knew seven years ago that we needed to make some improvements in order to sustain and be the care provider that we needed to be for the communities we serve,” said Bennett.

    In looking for ways to sustain and inspire improvements, he said the hospital realized that the Baldrige framework aligned with its mission.

    “The benefits that we’ve realized have helped us define what excellence is to us for the communities we serve,” he said. “[The framework has] helped us create discipline around our processes, improved our financial performance, and improved our focus on key quality metrics.”

    Bennett said adopting the framework came with some struggles. “When we began, trying to apply the Baldrige framework was for me nothing short of awkward. It felt like something else that we had to do. I could answer the ‘what’ questions [in the Baldrige Criteria], but I really couldn’t answer ‘how’ questions. We hadn’t really defined our processes.”

    “Thankfully, today the framework is how we do our work,” Bennett added.

    Modeling “Attributes of a Servant’s Heart”
    “We knew that to make any sustainable, meaningful change, there had to be deliberate change among senior leaders,” said Bennett, so the hospital developed a Servant Leadership System, with an emphasis on building its culture.

    Bennett said senior leaders knew that they needed to model the attributes of a servant’s heart (words around the circle in the graphic): selflessness, forgiveness, honesty, commitment, patience, kindness, humility, and respect.

    According to Bennett, the blue circles on the graphic are leadership goals (e.g., set organization direction/determine priorities, engage the workforce, monitor performance), and the triangle at the heart of the model, which lists the mission, vision, core values, covenants, and core competencies, represents the building blocks of culture.

    Identifying the Keys to Success
    According to Bennett, Memorial Hospital knows that the keys to its success are related to its focus on the mission, a committed workforce, and disciple around the strategic planning process.

    “Those things have been integral to us over our journey,” said Bennett. “We work to live our mission every day. It’s the foundation of all we do. And we consistently return to it as we seek discernment and perspective.”

    Similarly, workforce members are “empowered to be and to act,” said Bennett, adding that a no-pass zone at the hospital requires that all patients and their families, as well as all workforce members, are greeted at the front door.

    “Our workforce is key to building and sustaining our culture,” he said.

    Achieving Results
    Memorial Hospital’s results have helped propel it to national role-model status. Results include the following: 

    • Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) 5-star rating for overall quality of inpatient care since the ratings were released
    • National top-10%, net-positive, value-based-payment performance since 2017
    • Performance excellence outcomes: zero early elective deliveries before 39 weeks (since 2015), zero pressure ulcers in the Skilled Caring Center (since 2016), zero central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI; since 2016), and zero hospital methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections (since 2015)
    • “A” Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade since 2016
    • CMS top-10% performance in patient safety composite results since 2017
    • Registered nurse turnover rate below 2% since the first quarter of 2016

    “Thirty-seven,” added Bennett, “That’s how many [opportunities for improvement] we had in our feedback report [received with its Baldrige Award application]. . . . We realize that we’re the recipient of this wonderful award. Our patients are the recipients of the care we provide. . . . The quality that we provide can get better, and those 37 things will help us get there.”

    View more processes and results of Memorial Hospital and Health Care Center.


  2. The Kaleidoscope of employee morale and workplace wellness

    May 10, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

    Article contributed by Dr. Almas Tazein, BPIR.com Limited

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    Can we compare Einstein with Beethoven with Shakespeare? Likewise, one cannot undermine the significance of employees, irrespective of the chain of command. They are expected to create everyday miracles, survive the bullets in times of crisis with stoicism, or at least, sustain the positive status quo.

    And we wish to give back. Employee engagement / reward / recognition / appreciation – whatever we term it – it’s not about, but beyond the apathic sales incentives, official celebrations, or a fleeting ‘thank you’ over an email (for salvaging an impending operational-financial catastrophe). Maslow’s hierarchy confirms that all of us function at different levels of need at various stages of our professional lives. Our motivations are chalk and cheese – intra, and interpersonally.

    Furthermore, Texas Quick, an expert witness at trials of companies who were accused of overworking their employees, states that "when people get worked beyond their capacity, companies pay the price." Most experts feel that the chief responsibility for reducing stress should be the management. “Work-life balance ranks as the second most important workplace attribute behind compensation, according to research conducted by the Corporate Executive Board among more than 50,000 global workers”. (Dayton Daily News).

    So how do we plan to support our employees and make them feel cherished?

    How – With empirical case studies and global trends in how organisations contribute to their employees’ psychological health, physical wellness and social camaraderie at work and outside of it, here is a pragmatic guide with the 10 most relevant Best Practice Reports that BPIR.com has published in the employee morale and wellness domain.

    Who – From struggling organisations and its dispirited personnel, to eclectic leaders with their effervescent employees, this article will benefit and inspire one and all.

    Index of Best Practice Reports – Includes new and old (but still relevant ) reports
    1Employee Happiness
    2Employee Recognition
    3Workplace Wellness
    4Employee Motivation 2 & 1
    5Building a Healthy Society and Workforce: Awareness and Prevention of Diabetes
    6Employee Development
    7Emotional Intelligence
    8Work and Life Balance
    9Mental Toughness
    10Occupational Safety

    1. Employee Happiness

    Happiness at work is a mindset, which enables employees to maximize their performance and achieve their potential. An important part of this happiness is the emotional commitment or engagement that employees develop towards a company, its values, and its mission.

    Case Study: How the Head of an organisation implemented a Martini Culture, resulting in a reduction in voluntary turnover from 17% in 2013 to 6% in 2014, and a significant reduction in stress levels, and greater control over their work-life balance.

    2. Employee Recognition

    Despite the unquestioned benefits of employee recognition, organisations frequently execute their policies or programmes quite badly. In this light, many professional companies have now jumped on the bandwagon and offer employee recognition programmes and services. Employee recognition award.

    US $46 billion! That’s how much the employee recognition industry is worth annually. That is about two per cent of the total payroll for individual companies. Does recognition mean money? Read here for the Value and ROI in Employee Recognition.

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    3. Workplace Wellness

    Workplace wellness programmes are designed to help employees pursue a healthy lifestyle and reduce health risks, enabling to improve their physical, mental and social well-being. Because, ultimately, good health is the best investment plan for doing great business.

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    Measure and Evaluate – N.B.: this is a representative portion of the full self-assessment, which may be found in the member’s area at www.bpir.com

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    4. Employee Motivation 2

    Low employee morale leads to lower productivity, substandard work, and high staff turnover, all of which contribute to revenue losses. Writing in Aftermarket Business magazine, Tim Sramcik outlines the five misconceptions associated with improving low employee morale.

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    Example Cases – Philips Electronics, Deloitte LLP, Southwest Airlines, USA.

    Employee Motivation 1

    According to a research conducted by Greg Smith (2002), President of Chart Your Course International,

    Main causes of employee dissatisfaction at work / Factors that de-motivated staff were:

    Lack of appreciation33%
    Too much paperwork27%
    Problems with supervisors23%
    Poor pay and benefits22%
    Lack of training20%
    Lack of opportunity20%
    Fairness18%
    Problems with coworkers16%
    Commute15%
    Boring job9%

    The factors that workers thought were the most effective actions a firm could take to improve retention were:

    Train managers better32%
    Listen more28%
    Try something new24%
    Pay more23%
    Select managers better22%
    Set the example22%
    Hire better people18%
    Improve benefits13%

    Learn some key actions to implement strategies, and ensure and enhance motivation within your organisation. It is not an option, but a need to measure and evaluate your motivation strategies in order to establish how aligned individual objectives are to that of the organisation, and how motivated and committed employees say they are. Read how First Tennessee National Corporation initiated Work-life programmes to bring positive organisational results, and other novel case studies.

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    5. Building a Healthy Society and Workforce: Awareness and Prevention of Diabetes

    International Diabetes Federation reports that someone dies from diabetes every six seconds. Extensive research by the World Health Organisation estimates NCD mortality and morbidity of 56.9 million global deaths in 2016, 40.5 million, or 71%, were due to noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) i.e., cardiovascular diseases, cancers, diabetes and chronic lung diseases. The socioeconomic impacts of NCDs threaten progress towards the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which includes a target of reducing premature deaths from NCDs by one-third by 2030.

    This special issue focuses on some of the incredible efforts in the field of preventive health management and wellness initiatives to combat diabetes by governments, not-for-profit, private, and corporate organisations.

    The Blueprint for Change Programme by Novo Nordisk is a series of excellent case studies across more than 10 countries. Read how the World Health Organisation is effectively strategizing to salvage the threatening effect of this non-communicable disease.

    Explore novel social awareness campaigns for diabetes, and exemplary measures by health regulating bodies and government authorities in UK, USA, UAE, Canada, Australia, Belgium, India, Qatar, Europe, Saudi Arabia, Cayman Islands, Eastern Mediterranean Region, Hong Kong, along with the Global Report on diabetes.

    Hence, cost-effective strategies for dealing with diabetes and ongoing research are crucial  to the long-term effects on society and future generations.

    6. Employee Development

    Employee Development is a strategic investment typically provided through internships, job rotation, coaching, mentoring, training courses, and peer group assistance within the work place.
    Doing a fair share of the work: A UK survey concerning employee development which was carried out by "Investors in People" revealed that in all sizes of organisation half of employees reported working directly with someone who failed to do their fair share of work.

    Almost 4/10 managers – complained about colleagues not pulling their weight.
    40% of employees reported that their employer did not take any action to address this issue.
    Staff cited that working longer hours and feeling undervalued were amongst the most damaging issues they coped with, and that this in turn led to decisions to begin looking for a new job.

    7. Emotional Intelligence

    We have been led to believe that our IQ is the best measure of human potential. In the past 10 years, however, researchers have found that this isn’t necessarily the case and that a person’s emotional intelligence quotient (EQ) in actuality, is a greater predictor of success in life and work.

    EQ can have more explicit applications in the following domains: Communication between and among staff members; Conflict resolution; Customer service; Hiring; placement and staff turnover; Training and development; The development of a corporate culture or climate; Productivity; Leadership development.

    Unlike IQ, EQ can be developed and worked upon, having a significant impact on financial performance. Success stories: Recruitment costs in the US Air Force (USAF) were cut by a minimum of $3M annually due to its practice of choosing recruiters based on EQ-I criteria.

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    8. Work and Life Balance

    It is now accepted that family preoccupations can cause stress, absenteeism from work, adversely affect staff performance and productivity, and lead to resignations. It is a worldwide problem that employers can ill afford to ignore.

    Vancouver based Martha Frase-Blunt (2001) identifies that many employees, in their concern for their work, only take a ‘busman’s holiday’ – doing on their days off, or in vacation time, what they would do at work. Frase-Blunt cites studies that show workers take mobile phones, laptop computers, and beepers home over the weekends and on holidays. Calling into work to check progress, and accessing voicemail and e-mail were also shown to be common practices.

    Jill Casner-Lotto of the Work in America Institute believes that "while today’s communications devices are a boon to flexibility, freedom and enhanced sharing of information, they also undermine the work/life balance". The Society for Human Resource Management’s HR Content Expert, Nancy Lockwood (2003), also cites a recent study that "reveals that employees are often pre-occupied with work when not working, and when in the company of family and loved ones experience an inability to be meaningfully engaged in non-work spheres".

    The question is – What are businesses supposed to do about it?

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    9. Mental Toughness

    All companies want to be successful. But this would be a far-fetched idea if lackadaisical associates run the show, or associates have to communicate with their overtly sensitive colleagues. The situation may even demoralize a well-meaning team. Hence, employers aspire to hire pliable candidates, and leaders need to foster mettle in them by inspiring them to be relentless, i.e., lead by example.

    10.  Occupational Safety

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) – It is legally incumbent that employers have a common law duty to take judicious care of the health and safety of their employees. Based on the ergonomic survey and research data, safety cultures can be improved by optimizing safety-related communication throughout an organisation
    Some 2000 offices in the United States were assessed for the impact of ergonomic conditions, training, and equipment used by office workers. A sample of 299 employee evaluations reported measurable gains in productivity as a result of improved ergonomics, with an average increase of 34 minutes per day. At $30 per hour this represented $4,250 per year, per employee. Costs associated with performing the evaluations—along with the average hardware improvement costs—per employee amounted to $600. Therefore, net savings, without allowing for any injury or illness avoidance costs, was calculated at $3,650 per employee per year (i.e. $4,250 – $600), and the return on investment period was 2.3 months. Considerable savings were also recorded in illness and injury reductions, with a decrease of 28 per cent in cases.

    Successful safety programmes have to capture the hearts and minds of the people involved in them, where employees are motivated to take ownership of occupational safety, thereby plummeting the accident rates.


    To join BPIR.com and support our research, simply click here, or to find out more about membership, email membership@bpir.com. BPIR.com publishes a new best practice report every month with over 100 available to members.

  3. Best Practice Report: Think Tanks

    May 5, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

    Think tanks are defined as organisations that engage in the business of public policy. They research, analyse, and produce opinions on every imaginable topic in order to advise and inform public policy makers and those who think about public policy. Think tanks operate all around the world, usually as independent, not-for-profit organisations; they tend to support themselves through their products and consultancy services, as well as through donors and sponsors. They can be affiliated with the government, political groups, interest groups or private corporations.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    In This Report:

    1. What is a “think tank”?
    2. Which organisations have received recognition for excellence by being or by having a think tank?
    3. How have organisations reached high levels of success by being or by having a think tank?
    4. What research has been undertaken by and into think tanks?
    5. What tools and methods are used to achieve high levels of success in developing a think tank?
    6. How can the effectiveness of a think tank be measured?
    7. What do business leaders say about think tanks?
    8. Conclusion.

    Access the report from here. At the bottom of the page is a PDF version of the report for easy reading. If you are a non-member, you will find some of the links in this report do not work. To join BPIR.com and support our research simply click here or to find out more about membership, email membership@bpir.com. BPIR.com publishes a new best practice every month with over 80 available to members.


  4. Best Practice Report: Self-Managed Teams and Holacracy®

    May 4, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

    Self-managed teams are groups of employees who work with minimum supervision. Whereas in a hierarchical organisation employees have to report to managers, self-managed teams are responsible for handling various assignments, solving problems, and making decisions. Holacracy is one of the more recent systems of structuring self-managed teams within an organisation. When fully adopted, there is no conventional management hierarchy; instead, power is fully distributed, giving individuals and teams the freedom to self-manage while staying aligned to the organisation’s core purpose. Holacracy favours small teams, called circles, with team members holding a number of different roles depending on the assignment. These circles self-organise, make rapid consensus-based decisions, and have the flexibility to adjust roles and solutions effectively to meet organisational goals.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    In This Report:

    1. What are “self-managed teams” and “Holacracy”?
    2. Which organisations have received recognition for their use of self-managed teams and Holacracy?
    3. How have organisations reached high levels of success through their use of self-managed teams and Holacracy?
    4. What research has been undertaken into self-managed teams and Holacracy?
    5. What tools and methods are used to achieve high levels of success using self-managed teams and Holacracy?
    6. How can success in the use of self-managed teams and Holacracy be measured?
    7. What do business leaders say about self-managed teams and Holacracy?
    8. Conclusion.

    Access the report from here. At the bottom of the page is a PDF version of the report for easy reading. If you are a non-member, you will find some of the links in this report do not work. To join BPIR.com and support our research simply click here or to find out more about membership, email membership@bpir.com. BPIR.com publishes a new best practice every month with over 80 available to members.


  5. Summer School on Quality and Organizational Excellence 2019

    by BPIR.com Limited

    Welcome to the Summer School on Quality and Organizational Excellence 2019, at the University of Minho, Portugal.

    Our goal is to bring people together from across the globe, sharing experiences and discussing Quality. The Summer School promotes more than 40 hours of contact, across which you will have the opportunity to learn, share experiences and meet new colleagues who share the same passion for Quality. This year’s edition focuses on Lean Six Sigma improvement projects. By attending the Summer School you will have the chance to learn more about this improvement methodology and see real life implementation projects, become familiar with unique examples and approaches that will be shared by the Speakers – Lance Coleman and Liz Keim – and participate in a Lean Six-sigma workshop.

    The courses will take place throughout the week, with daily classes, group work and industrial visits, balancing theoretical and practical examples of the best practices in the field of Lean Six Sigma. The program is composed by a series of different opportunities to learn, improve knowledge, and contact with tools, methods and industrial best practices in the implementation of Lean Six Sigma.

    You are invited to apply at http://qoe.dps.uminho.pt

    Paulo Sampaio, Chair and André M. Carvalho, Co-Chair

    What can you expect from us?
    A well-balanced program, featuring lectures, practical assignments and industrial examples of best practices in Quality. A team dedicated to create the best experience, where knowledge, networking and fun are brought together for improved learning results.

    What do we expect from you?
    Your drive and motivation not only to learn and deepen your understanding of Quality, but also to share it: the background of each student will be a vital piece for an improved learning experience, with all participants having the opportunity to share knowledge and experiences regarding Quality and Organizational Excellence.

    Important Dates:
    Application deadline: May 15, 2019
    Acceptance notification: May 20, 2019
    Registration fee payment deadline: May 31, 2019
    Summer School: July 15-20, 2019