1. Make the Baldrige Framework “How You Work”: Lessons from Adventist Health Castle

    February 21, 2020 by BPIR.com Limited

    Originally posted on Blogrige by Christine Schaefer

    When Steve Bovey first learned about the Baldrige Excellence Framework, he was impressed that it was not “another flavor of the month” among management fads. In contrast, he said he saw that it is “a systematic framework that can apply to any type of business, which can use whatever flavor (performance improvement system) it has already chosen.”

    “The Baldrige framework doesn’t need to replace what you have,” he added. “It makes what you have more effective.”

    In the case of Adventist Health Castle (AHC)—the 2017 Baldrige Award recipient in Hawaii where Bovey serves as quality improvement coordinator—he summed up the benefits this way: “The Baldrige framework has helped us look at our organization from the 30,000-foot view to enhance alignment and integration.”

    “The [Baldrige] Criteria have helped us identify our blind spots and become more systematic in our methodology through the use of ADLI. When we became more systematic about our real work, we achieved the results that we needed.”

    How AHC Makes Baldrige “How We Work”
    With a focus on how his health care system uses the Baldrige framework to continue to support excellent performance today, Bovey looks forward to leading a session at the Baldrige Program’s upcoming Quest for Excellence® Conference. “Our time is too valuable to be doing extra work, so we have made a conscious effort to make Baldrige ‘how we work,’” said Bovey recently. “During [our Quest] session, we will describe methods we have used to make this goal a reality.”

    Asked for an example of how AHC has benefited from integrating the Baldrige framework, Bovey responded, “By merging category teams with existing teams and committees, we have reduced the number of meetings and increased the effectiveness of our teams.”

    He further described how AHC teams of employees use the Baldrige process evaluation factors of Approach, Deployment, Learning, Integration (ADLI) to think about the performance of their work processes. The teams now do an annual update of responses to Baldrige Criteria questions in the category related to their function in the organization, and they use an ADLI table format to capture information in those four dimensions of process evaluation, Bovey said.

    “Our team members also have received training to become internal Baldrige examiners to evaluate organizational performance both in their category and in one other team’s category. The result of this annual examination is a prioritized list of improvement opportunities for their team in the coming year,” he added.

    Tips to Introduce Your Organization to the Baldrige Framework
    Based on AHC’s experience, Bovey shared the following tips for those in other organizations who are interested in introducing or sustaining their use of the Baldrige framework:

    1. Align Baldrige categories with the real work of organizational teams/committees.
    2. Engage team leaders and team members in an annual Baldrige application update [updating responses to Baldrige Criteria questions], but with a focus on updating bullet points in an ADLI table rather than “wordsmithing” paragraphs in a document.
    3. Train team members to be examiners and apply that training to evaluate their own work and the work of another (category) team.
    4. Use this evaluation to identify strengths and prioritize opportunities for improvement for the coming year.
    5. Develop 90-day action plans in each team.
    6. Schedule quarterly meetings for team leaders to provide updates to their 90-day action plans and to identify opportunities for integration.

    Finally, Bovey shared with me what he’d say about the Baldrige framework if he wanted to give a quick summary of the benefits to a group of senior leaders who knew little or nothing about it:

    “If you are tired of putting out fires—and of the left hand not knowing what the right hand is doing—then you may want to consider using the Baldrige framework. It’s not so much about an award as it is about helping you get the results that you need.”

  2. Call for Paper:4th International Conference on Quality Engineering and Management (ICQEM)

    February 17, 2020 by BPIR.com Limited

    In 2020 the International Conference on Quality Engineering and Management (ICQEM) is back to Portugal, to the city of Braga.

    The ICQEM is an international forum to present and discuss the progresses in the Quality Management, Quality Engineering and Organizational Excellence fields. Consequently, since the beginning, the conference covers different topics as: Standards, Continuous Improvement, Supply Chain Quality Management, Management Systems, Lean Six Sigma, Quality Tools, Quality Management in Higher Education, Quality Management in Services, Total Quality Management, Organizational Excellence, The Future of Quality and Quality 4.0.

    This conference provides the unique opportunity to share the latest insights of academic and industrial research on Quality Engineering and Management and Organizational Excellence, as well as to experience the unique environment of the North of Portugal.

    The ICQEM20 includes keynote speeches, parallel technical sessions, workshops and a number of social and networking events, including the conference dinner.

    You are kindly am inviting you to submit your papers to the ICQEM 2020!

    Relevant topics include, but not limited to:
    – Continuous Improvement
    – Customer Satisfaction
    – Digital Quality
    – Management Systems
    – Operational Excellence
    – Organizational Excellence Models
    – Organizational Improvement
    – Quality 4.0
    – Quality and Risk Management
    – Quality Engineering
    – Quality in Design and Development
    – Quality Management and Innovation
    – Quality Management in different activity sectors (healthcare, higher education, services, …)
    – Quality Tools
    – Reliability & Maintenance
    – Six Sigma / Lean-Six Sigma
    – Standards
    – Supply Chain Quality Management
    – The Future of Quality and Organizational Excellence
    – Total Quality Management

    The ICQEM 2020 will be held at Universidade do Minho, Portugal, 15-17 July, 2020.

    Here is the link of conference: http://icqem.dps.uminho.pt/index.html

    Let’s take advantage of this great opportunity and make with your contributions an event with Quality, shared and built by such a top level group of participants!


  3. Best Practice Report: Strategy: Strategic Planning Process

    February 9, 2020 by BPIR.com Limited

    Strategic planning is a systemic process through which an organisation assesses where it is at the present time, communicates where it wants to be in the future (through its mission and vision), and makes the necessary decisions to reach its goals. The process includes making sure that monitoring, control and improvement mechanisms are in place, which help to ensure the smooth implementation of the plan and mitigate any interruptions.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    In This Report:

    1. What is a “strategic planning process”?
    2. Which organisations have been recognised for their strong strategic planning processes?
    3. How have organisations been successful with their strategic planning process?
    4. What research has been undertaken into strategic planning processes?
    5. What tools and methods are used to achieve high levels of success in a strategic planning process?
    6. How can the success of strategic planning processes be measured?
    7. What do business leaders say about the strategic planning process?
    8. Conclusion.

    Access the report from here. At the bottom of the page is a PDF version of the report for easy reading. If you are a non-member, you will find some of the links in this report do not work. To join BPIR.com and support our research simply click here or to find out more about membership, email membership@bpir.com. BPIR.com publishes a new best practice every month with over 80 available to members.


  4. BPIR.com Newsletter: February 2020

    February 2, 2020 by BPIR.com Limited

    Image

    Twitter

    Facebook

    Image

    Best Practice Report: Leadership: Governance

    Governance is the ethical and effective management of an organisation by its executives and its governing board of directors or trustees. The corporate governance framework consists of rules, practices and processes to ensure accountability, fairness and transparency in an organisation’s relationship with all of its stakeholders (including financiers, customers, management, employees, government and the community).

     

    Featured Events

     

    Latest News

    • Three Critical “Future of Work” Forecasts for the 2020s….  read more
    • It Is 2020. Is Your CEO Thinking about Perpetual Reinvention?….  read more
    • Listing and analysis of Business Excellence journal papers from 1990 to today…. read more
    • TRADE Benchmarking Stars Announced at the Grand Finale of Dubai We Learn – Excellence Makers 3rd Cycle, 2019…. read more

     

    Image

    Competency-based education speeds up learning


    This paper addresses a critical aspect of the Fourth Industrial Revolution: understanding the skills of the future and how new models of learning must be embraced to address the challenges exposed with existing systems of learning. One method of flexible programme design discussed is competency-based education (CBE), an effective method to allow individuals with a base layer of knowledge to rapidly proceed through a programme where they have relevant skills and spend more time learning those skills they do not have. The Sinclair Community College in the US transitioned some of its Computer Information Systems programmes into a CBE model which allowed individuals who had IT skills to move quickly through the programme. In the first three years, Sinclair reported that CBE students completed degree programmes in an average of just four terms, 35% faster than non-CBE students. In addition, graduation rates for CBE students were double that of non-CBE students over the three-year period of Sinclair’s first CBE program offerings.

     

    Image

    Business Excellence model delivers for an orchestra

    From its creation from the bankruptcy of its predecessor in 2011, the New Mexico Philharmonic Orchestra (MNPhil), a classical music organisation in the US, adopted the Baldrige criteria, focussed on performance management and sustainability, and thrived. For six years, the orchestra tracked and trended data, with about 40% benchmarked against external sources. One of the significant ways that NMPhil used the Baldrige Criteria was to measure stakeholder satisfaction across six segments. The organization attained 97% stakeholder satisfaction as measured by the number of 4s and 5s on a 5-point scale. The orchestra received similar ratings, at around 97%, for how the audience judged its artistic excellence. Consequently the orchestra developed a stable financial base. NMPhil was awarded a New Mexico Roadrunner Award [the second highest honour from Quality New Mexico, a Baldrige-based member of the Alliance for Performance Excellence) in 2017.

    Do you know that in BPIR.com users can navigate the databases through four business excellence models?

    BPIR Tip of the Month – Business Excellence Models

    Business Excellence Models

    This area of the web-site allows users to navigate the databases through a choice of business excellence models (Malcolm Baldrige Model, EFQM Excellence Model, Singapore Quality Award Model, Canadian Framework for Business Excellence, and an overview generic model). Navigation via the models can be used to look at specific categories that correspond to areas within their organisation that have been identified as in need of improvement, or to specific areas of personal interest. Using the model categories to navigate will quickly and effectively lead the user to the information we have researched so far in relation to the areas in question

     


  5. Three Critical “Future of Work” Forecasts for the 2020s

    January 24, 2020 by BPIR.com Limited

    Article originally posted on Innovation Resource Consulting Group by Robert B. Tucker

    Each year I interview hundreds of organizational leaders and individual contributors on their most pressing business challenges. Through surveys and one-on-one interviews, I probe people’s outlook on the future. I zero in on their most critical personal and professional challenges.

    In recent years, workplace issues have dominated these surveys. In short: the future is arriving faster than ever, catching employers and employees unprepared. Some examples:

    • A furniture manufacturer in North Carolina complained to me that his company is hamstrung by a lack of qualified workers to fill orders for his custom-made products. Almost daily, he sees his experienced, Boomer-age employees calling it quits, and taking their years of experience and hands-on skills with them.
    • A community college president in Iowa described to me the impact of declining enrollments as workers take advantage of the booming economy in his area.
    • A Silicon Valley human resources manager expressed frustrated that tighter regulatory visa restrictions are making it difficult to attract enough talented engineers.
    • A college textbook executive in Boston is trying to find his footing after being displaced by an industry upheaval that decimated his former employers’ business model.

    As a futurist and innovation speaker, I work across industries, and often, across continents. This gives a first-hand perspective on workforce threats and opportunities. As much change as has taken place in the prior decade, I don’t believe we have grasped the extent of the changes ahead in the 2020s. Organizations and their leaders will rise or fall, prosper or be blindsided, based on their ability and willingness to anticipate and creatively respond to rapid change. I encourage my clients to “assault assumptions” and blow up the traditional human resource department’s short-sightedness and instead look, think and act ahead of the curve.

    The three forecasts below have to do with how the workplace is changing at the dawn of the new decade. They revolve around how the world of work will evolve. Take time to ponder these predictions and then prepare to take action on tomorrow’s trends today.

    Forecast #1. Job Category churn will accelerate, creating sunrise and sunset occupations.

    A hundred years ago, buggy whip makers got wiped out by the horseless carriage. In recent years, occupational categories such as travel agent, coal miner, meter reader, locomotive firer, and many others saw contraction (sunsetting), while other categories (sunrise occupations) boomed, creating millions of new jobs.

    The fastest-growing category in the United States, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, is solar panel installer, followed closely by wind turbine technician. LinkedIn research suggests that categories such as data scientists, physician assistants, nurses, marketing and customer success managers, enterprise account executives, home health workers, and information security analysts have added and will need workers and often can’t find sufficient numbers to hire. They will continue to explode in demand and pay above average wages.

    In 2005, more than 1,200 people applied for home appraiser traineeships. In 2016 only about 100 did, Reason: enabling technology — in this case, artificial intelligence — is sunsetting this profession at a rapid pace. Lenders such as Fannie Mae, Zillow and others are allowing certain loans to be approved without an appraisal by a human being. If present trends continue (always a caveat), the occupation of home appraiser may go the way of the buggy whip maker over the next decade.

    Action steps: Feel the “churn” in your own industry and line of work, then “futurize” your thinking, and plan accordingly. Whether you’re just starting out or are well along in your career, successful navigation in the 2020s involves more than just following your passion or going with the flow. Choose proactively and wisely based on sunrise/sunset projections. Mentor others. If someone you know is thinking of paying $5000 to become certified as a home appraiser, help them out. Suggest they first consult LinkedIn’s lists of fastest growing (and fastest disappearing) occupations. Avoid occupations with no future or plan to reinvent them as booming luxury travel broker Virtuoso has done. Even if you’re well into your career, pay attention to future forecasts in your profession and industry.

    Forecast #2. Lifelong learning, up-skilling and re-skilling will no longer be optional activities. They will be vitally necessary habits for sustained career success.

    The median age of workers at Facebook, LinkedIn, SpaceX and other tech companies is 29. The hiring rate slows markedly at 34. Generation Z’s recent arrival in the workplace is jolting Millennials into realizing that they are no longer the new kids on the block, and irrelevance happens faster today than ever before. The solution? Constant up-skilling (expanding your capabilities) and re-skilling (learning new skills) so you can do a different job or keep on doing your current job once routine parts of it have been automated by software.

    Don’t expect your current employer to do this for you. A relatively few firms are as forward-looking as AT&T in this regard. Each year, AT&T’s CEO shares where the company is going, and gives insight into what skills will be needed to remain employed in the foreseeable future. AT&T then partners with Udacity to create “nano-degree” courses which help employees develop needed emerging skills, for which the company is willing to pay for. The only caveat: employees must take these courses on their own time.

    Action steps: To thrive in this new world of work, think of yourself as You, Incorporated. Today You, Inc. is selling services to your current employer. But what about your next move or even your next career? Avoid putting all your eggs in one basket, explore other careers, keep; your resume current, volunteer for new projects and stretch assignments, especially those which develop your “soft” skills and innovation skills. Be willing to relocate for new opportunities. Take risks that pull you out of your comfort zone.

    Forecast #3. Automation will accelerate job displacement, but “augmentation” rather than joblessness will be the norm.

    According to research, currently available technology, if fully implemented, could automate almost half of the activities people are paid to perform today. And “currently existing technology” is advancing at the rate of Moore’s Law, which predicts a doubling of capacity every 18 to 24 months.

    In 2017, McKinsey ‘s research brought ominous headlines with a report that indicated 73 million people were in danger of losing their jobs through automation. But then a funny thing happened. The unemployment rate in the United States plummeted to a 50-year low, and employers and employees alike now wonder: if automation is going to wreak such havoc, wouldn’t its effects already be starting to show up in unemployment rolls? Instead of massive displacement, there will most likely be continuing and constant displacement of workers as automation becomes a driving force in both the service sector and manufacturing. The new trend, however, is augmentation – technologically enhancing the worker’s unique skills to create a greater whole.

    Action steps: Look at how automation is impacting and will likely impact the work that you do, the profession you are in, and the company you lead. Ask: where are present trends headed for your profession? How will you need to add value differently in the coming years?

    In the past decade, job category churn has accelerated to the point where front-line workers, professionals, and employers alike must “think ahead of the curve” or face unpleasant surprises. But those who anticipate and plan for change can create their own reality, and ride the waves of change.


    Robert B. Tucker is a renowned global futurist and innovation keynote speaker with a client list that includes over 200 of the Fortune 500 companies. Founder and president of Innovation Resource Consulting Group, Tucker is an internationally recognized pioneer in the field of strategic foresight and innovation. For more information, please see: www.innovationresource.com