1. Benchmarking in year 2030, any idea how it will look like?

    June 1, 2010 by
     

    Future of Benchmarking
    The Global Benchmarking Network is embarking on a project to look at the future for Benchmarking up to the year 2030. This project will take into account new technologies and social networking opportunities as well as issues such as global financial crises, governance, political, social and environmental trends and changing natural characteristics.  However the project also needs to look well beyond the current issues.

    Any inputs would be greatly appreciated.

    This project will answer the following questions – What will Benchmarking look like in 2030 – and in between? What are the tools, methodologies and technologies that Benchmarkers can use now to help organisations and economies to improve their outcomes? The main outcome will be to report on results of a  Roundtable at end 2010 – as part of the Dubai GBN AGM and Annual Conference.

    The project will investigate the use of benchmarking and the future use of benchmarking techniques: It will connect Benchmarking experts with people from politics, science and companies and discuss the use and future use of benchmarking (e.g. survey, roundtable discussion, delphi study). Key parties to the proposal are Bruce Searles, Benchmarking Partnerships (project leader), Dr Robin Mann, bpir.com and Dr Holger Kohl, Fraunhofer.

    Best wishes,

    Bruce Searles
    Director
    Benchmarking Partnerships


  2. Survey on Business Improvement Initiatives – Can you help?

    August 14, 2009 by

    Hello all,

    I’m Musli, a PhD student at the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER), Massey University (BPIR.com’s founding organisation). I’m conducting a survey on business improvement initiatives. This survey is part of my doctoral study, which is supervised by Dr. Robin Mann and Dr. Nigel Grigg.

    As you know, there are numerous business improvement initiatives that can be used by organisations to improve quality, productivity and sustainability towards achieving excellence. The initiatives can be approaches, systems, tools and/or techniques, such as, Six Sigma, Lean, ISO9000, ISO14000, Business Process Reengineering, and Benchmarking. The right initiatives to be used may vary depending on several factors, for instance, the current maturity level of the organisation, organisation type and size, and the capabilities and responsibilities of the workforce.  Moreover, there is also a lack of clear understanding by people regarding when, where and how to implement the initiatives. In order to help organisations to select suitable initiatives according to the contexts, this survey attempts to identify where the main business improvement initiatives should be used according to the following areas: leadership and social responsibilities, strategy and policy, customers, processes, workforce, and, partnerships and resources.

    All practitioners, managers, executives, consultants and/or academicians who have a good understanding and experience on business improvement initiatives are invited to complete the on-line survey – click on link below:

    http://www.surveygizmo.com/s/140713/initiative

    I hope you can participate. If you have completed the questionnaire and request form, you will be sent a copy of the survey findings through email, once it is ready.

    Please complete the survey by 28th of February 2010. For further details, please refer to the front page of survey instrument

    Your kind participation would be much appreciated. Thank you very much.

    Best regards,

    Musli Mohammad
    PhD Student
    Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER)


  3. Culture for Continuous Improvement

    August 13, 2009 by
    There is some exciting research going on at the COER (Centre of Organisational Excellence Research) at the moment.
     
    Past research shows that culture plays a key role in sustaining continuous improvement in organisations. Continuous improvement, in turn, is often viewed as critical for organisational efficiency and waste reduction. However, the effect of culture in the specific context is less well understood. Several levels of culture such as the national culture, corporate culture and organisational sub-cultures, are present simultaneously. Which ones are important, and under what conditions do they become important? What needs to happen to ensure that the existing cultural diversity results in continuous improvement? Which role does – and, in fact, can – management and organisational leadership play?
     
    This doctoral research is seeking answers to these questions using a multiple-case methodology. For participating organisations, this presents an opportunity to benefit from cutting-edge research and at the same time help advance the scientific understanding.
     
    Participation in the study is free of charge. If you are interested in having your organisation participate, please get in touch with me for further information – either by email (J.P.Wagner@massey.ac.nz ) or by leaving a comment.
     
    Jürgen 'Phil' Wagner

    PhD Student
    Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER)
    Massey University