1. Learning from Role Models: Category 1: Leadership

    June 2, 2020 by BPIR.com Limited

    Originally posted on blogrige by Dawn Bailey

    Baldrige Criteria Blog Series
    In this blog series, we are highlighting some of the learning (successful strategies and programs) shared by Baldrige Award recipients to highlight the categories of the Baldrige Criteria and how your organization might consider using them as inspiration.

    What is Category 1?

    Category 1 of the Baldrige Criteria covers your organization’s leadership.

    Category 1: Leadership
    This category asks how senior leaders’ personal actions and your governance system guide and sustain your organization. It asks about the key aspects of your senior leaders’ responsibilities, with the aim of creating an organization that is successful now and in the future. It also asks how the organization ensures that everyone in the organization behaves legally and ethically, how it fulfills its societal contributions, and how it supports its key communities.

    Baldrige Award Recipient Best Practices
    Following are some leadership practices shared by Baldrige Award recipients (Donor Alliance, Mary Greeley Medical Center, and Tri County Tech) in the realms of supporting a mission-driven workforce, reinforcing culture, setting expectations, fulfilling societal contributions, and supporting key communities. What could your organization learn/adapt?

    Donor Alliance
    2018 Baldrige Award Recipient, Nonprofit

    Successful nonprofit organizations know that a workforce committed to the mission is one element of success; Donor Alliance, the third largest U.S. organ procurement organization by geographic service area, knows that a commitment to mission is everything.

    In the year Donor Alliance received the Baldrige Award, 100% of staff members indicated that they understood how their jobs helped the organization achieve success. Also, staff members consistently reported that they understood the company’s plans for future success and how their work supports that success.

    Senior leaders demonstrate a commitment to the mission at every opportunity. Each organizational presentation begins with review of the mission, vision, and values (MVV). To ensure transparency, senior leaders communicate key decisions to help staff understand the reason for and impact of them. Engagement is partly measured by staff members demonstrating a widespread awareness, understanding, and connection to the MVV, along with how their own personal objectives contribute to fulfilling the organization’s mission to save lives through organ and tissue donation and transplantation.

    Senior leaders also emphasize the mission-driven culture by inviting donor families and organ/tissue recipients to share their stories during quarterly all-staff meetings. These stories provide employees with a clear connection of their work to achieving the mission.

    The organization’s approaches for creating an environment for success have undergone multiple refinements. Most recently, an Integration Team was created to improve and integrate approaches for strategy development, innovation, and knowledge management. In 2018, based on the Integration Team’s feedback to senior leaders, the organization moved to an integrated platform to manage both organizational strategic and individual performance.

    The deployment of strategic objectives, strategic goals, and action plans strengthens alignment from individual employees to the organization’s objectives and mission. Leaders review personal goal progress with each employee during monthly 1:1 meetings.

    In addition, the Organizational Rhythm integrates all of these approaches together to help the organization focus on the actions to stay mission-driven and meet the goals of the strategic plan. The Organizational Rhythm provides the structure for how Donor Alliance tracks, evaluates, and improves key systems, processes, and deployment of key approaches throughout the organization.

    Mary Greeley Medical Center
    2019 Baldrige Award Recipient, Health Care

    The tag line “Doing What’s Right” for Mary Greeley Medical Center (MGMC) not only captures a key characteristic of the organization’s culture but makes clear the expectations that senior leaders have not only for their staff but for themselves. As part of the culture, leaders reinforce the tag line through the Patient and Family Advisory Council, where patients and families share their views of “what’s right” and learn about and contribute to important changes; in leaders’ visits to patients on care units and to employees in their work environments; and through leaders’ participation in improvement events. The tag line reinforces MGMC’s mission, vision, and values (MVV) and supports a culture where employees are empowered to continuously improve their work and to do what’s right.

    Senior leaders systematically set, communicate, and deploy the MVV through the Leadership System, which is aligned with the requirements of patients, other customers, and stakeholders. Leaders personally and regularly share the vision and values with the workforce, medical staff, and key suppliers and partners. In addition, senior leaders recognize employees for exhibiting the MVV in their daily work and send personal thank-you notes to employees’ homes.

    The personal actions of senior leaders reflect a commitment to the organization’s values through listening to staff members’ concerns and accomplishments, through fair and respectful two-way communication, and through CEO-led employee focus groups. Respect is reinforced through communication and support of engaging those closest to the work to be innovative in the design and re-design of their work and through sharing progress with all employees.

    In 2017, MGMC adopted the Big Dot Goal philosophy to create laser focus on action required to achieve key organizational strategies (reduce preventable harm, improve inpatient experience, increase employee engagement, and achieve operating margin). The philosophy ensures that senior leaders create and reinforce a culture of doing what’s right. Each vice president is assigned a Big Dot Goal based on his/her area of responsibility, and he/she brings progress-to-plan on the goal to monthly meetings. The Big Dot Goals and leader assignment of such are aligned with the organization’s performance management system and are cascaded throughout the organization and hardwired into daily operations through the senior leader strategic plan review, leader monthly meeting model, Leader Business Review, and workforce Big Dot Goal cards to support operational decision making.

    Tri County Tech
    2018 Baldrige Award Recipient, Education

    Tri County Tech (TCT) contributes to society by providing education for a skilled workforce and preparing students for continuing education. TCT resides in one of the most poverty-stricken U.S. states, but the school offers students hope by breaking the cycle of poverty through placement in good jobs and opportunities for continuing education.

    TCT makes every effort to provide opportunities that help students reach their goals. The Tri County Foundation provides opportunities and financial assistance that allow students to be successful in their selected programs of study. The foundation’s goal is “No student should be denied access to education due to their ability to pay.” TCT created a process through its Student Success Advisors for disadvantaged students to receive financial assistance, including funding for eye exams, gas cards, and monies for needed medication and even food, a most basic need that is sometimes not easily obtained.

    Societal well-being and benefit are part of TCT’s overall strategy, aligning with its value of investing in the community and its core competency of economic and community development. TCT has two employee-led standing committees: the Community Relations Committee and Bright Ideas Committee.

    The Community Relations Committee’s focus is aligned with the value of investing in the community. The committee leads the process for selecting and prioritizing societal well-being efforts. The process has four steps:

    1. Determine the top-three fundraising events and volunteer activities to be supported by TCT’s workforce.
    2. Expect each workforce member to perform a minimum of 16 community service hours, which is included in his/her individual action plans, with eight of those hours during paid time-off. (A key performance measure of the Operational Plan is for 100% of the workforce to attain community service goals.)
    3. Analyze the results of TCT’s community involvement.
    4. Make recommendations for improvements that will lead to the selection of future fundraising events and volunteer activities.

    Community interest and concerns are addressed through meetings with partner schools, towns, and the Board of Education. In full transparency, senior leaders share organizational performance through measurement and reporting systems, monthly Superintendent Forums attended by all employees, and workgroup-level communications. In the year TCT received the Baldrige Award, more than 300 workforce members and students volunteered for United Way’s Day of Caring, making TCT the largest contingent of volunteers from one organization.


  2. Does Everyone Know What Your Mission Means (Expects)?

    March 18, 2020 by BPIR.com Limited

    Originally posted on Blogrige by Dawn Bailey

    “What is your organization attempting to accomplish?”
    According to the Baldrige Excellence Framework, this question addresses your mission: your organization’s overall function. The mission might define cus­tomers or markets served, distinctive or core competencies, or technologies used.

    A Mission Statement of the People

    In a wonderful speech from 2005, Sr. Mary Jean Ryan, president and CEO (retired) of SSM Health Care, the first Baldrige Award recipient in health care, said, “For any organization, the mission is the lifeblood. . . the fundamental reason why we do what we do.”

    She went on to talk about her health care system’s early challenges with not having a common mission statement, instead allowing its health care facilities across seven regions the autonomy to identify their own missions and values. SSM eventually “discovered” a 13-word mission statement, involving nearly 3,000 employees at every level of the organization from every one of its entities, she said.

    “It wouldn’t have taken long for our communications department to come up with a catchy mission statement . . . that everybody in the system could relate to,” said Ryan during her presentation. “But we realized that a mission statement . . . must be of the people, by the people, and for the people. . . . If a solid mix of employees has not helped create the mission statement, it will not truly belong to them, and the potential to transform your organization will be hindered.”

    In 1999, after a year-long process, SSM came up with the following mission statement that is still used today:

    “Through our exceptional health care services, we reveal the healing presence of God.”

    The SSM website says that the mission statement and values are known by every employee and used to guide decisions and how staff members treat one another. Ryan said, “The mission and values must . . . be an internal guidepost to our own behavior. Because if we don’t treat one another well, how can we ever expect that our patients will feel that they’ve experienced the healing presence of God?”

    “This wonderful experience of rearticulating our mission and values might never have happened had we not used the Baldrige framework to improve our organization,” added Ryan.

    Award Winners’ Mission Statements
    Recently, a Baldrige Executive Fellow took a look at the mission statements of the Baldrige Award recipients. I thought this was an interesting exercise, so I focused on the 25 health care winners that came after SSM won in 2002. The following were their missions at the time they won the Baldrige Award:

    2019
    Adventist Health White Memorial
    Los Angeles, CA
    Mission: “Living God’s love by inspiring health, wholeness and hope.”

    Mary Greeley Medical Center
    Ames, IA
    Mission: “To advance health through specialized care and personal touch.”

    2018
    Memorial Hospital and Health Care Center
    Jasper, IN
    Mission: “Christ’s healing mission of compassion empowers us to be for others through quality and excellence.”

    2017
    Adventist Health Castle
    Oahu, HI
    Mission: “Living God’s love by inspiring health, wholeness, and hope.”

    Southcentral Foundation (2017 and 2011 Baldrige Award winner)
    Anchorage, AK
    Mission: “Working together with the Native Community to achieve wellness through health and related services.”

    2016
    Kindred Nursing and Rehabilitation – Mountain Valley (now Mountain Valley of Cascadia)
    Kellogg, ID
    Mission: “To promote healing, provide hope, preserve dignity, and produce value, for each patient, resident, family member, customer, employee, and shareholder we serve.”

    Memorial Hermann Sugar Land Hospital
    Sugar Land, TX
    Mission: “A not-for-profit, community-owned, health system with spiritual values, dedicated to providing high-quality health services in order to improve the health of the people of Southeast Texas.”

    2015
    Charleston Area Medical Center Health System
    Charleston, WV
    Mission: “Striving to provide the best health care to every patient, every day.”

    2014
    Hill Country Memorial
    Fredericksburg, TX
    Mission: “Remarkable Always.”

    St. David’s HealthCare
    Austin, TX
    Mission: “To provide exceptional care to every patient, every day with a spirit of warmth, friendliness, and personal pride.”

    2013
    Sutter Davis Hospital
    Davis, CA
    Mission: “To enhance the well-being of people in the communities we serve, through a not-for-profit commitment to compassion and excellence in health care services.”

    2012
    North Mississippi Health Services
    Tupelo, MS
    Mission: “To be the provider of the best patient-centered care and health services in America.”

    2011
    Henry Ford Health System
    Detroit, MI
    Mission: “To improve human life through excellence in the science and art of health care and healing.”

    Schneck Medical Center
    Seymour, IN
    Mission: “To provide quality healthcare to all we serve.”

    2010
    Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital
    Downers Grove, IL
    Mission: “To serve the health needs of individuals, families, and communities through a wholistic approach.”

    2009
    AtlantiCare
    Egg Harbor Township, NJ
    Mission: “We deliver health and healing to all people through trusting relationships.”

    Heartland Health (now Mosaic)
    St. Joseph, MO
    Mission: “To improve the health of individuals and communities located in the Heartland region and provide the right care, at the right time, in the right place, at the right cost with outcomes second to none.”

    2008
    Poudre Valley Health System (now part of University of Colorado Health)
    Fort Collins, CO
    Mission: “To be an independent, non-profit organization and to provide innovative, comprehensive care of the highest quality, always exceeding customer expectations.”

    2007
    Mercy Health System (now part of MercyRockford Health System)
    Janesville WI
    Mission: “To provide exceptional healthcare services resulting in healing in the broadest sense.”

    Sharp HealthCare
    San Diego, CA
    Mission: “To improve the health of those we serve with a commitment to excellence in all that we do.”

    2006
    North Mississippi Medical Center
    Tupelo, MS
    Mission: “To continuously improve the health of the people of our region.”

    2005
    Bronson Methodist Hospital
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Mission: “Provide excellent healthcare services.”

    2004
    Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Hamilton
    Hamilton, NJ
    Mission: “Committed to Excellence Through Service. We exist to promote, preserve, and restore the health of our community.”

    2003
    Baptist Hospital, Inc.
    Pensacola, FL
    Mission: “To provide superior service based on Christian values to improve the quality of life for people and communities served.”

    Saint Luke’s Health System
    Kansas City, MO
    Mission: “Committed to the highest levels of excellence in providing health services to all patients in a caring environment. We are dedicated to medical research and education. As a member of the Saint Luke’s Health System, we are committed to enhancing the physical, mental, and spiritual health of the communities we serve.”

    Assessment of Mission Statements
    I think what these health care organizations are attempting to accomplish is pretty clear from reading these missions. I also think it’s interesting that embedded in these missions are the expectations for staff members of how to treat patients and one another. Patients and other customers might also have care expectations after reading such missions.

    • Have you thought about what your mission says about your organization?
    • Does each employee know what it means and how his/her job relates to and supports it?

    In other words, is your mission statement of the people?


  3. Board of Director Responsibilities

    November 8, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

    Article originally posted on Blogrige by Harry Hertz

    The Baldrige Excellence Framework is underpinned by a set of 11 core values and concepts. These core values have guided both the development and understanding of the Baldrige Criteria for many years. They have served as the basis for defining role model leadership attributes. These leadership attributes, with a focus on the roles that Boards of Directors play, are also applicable to their performance. The core values are listed below with examples of their meaning for Boards.

    The values and examples are equally appropriate to public and privately held businesses, nonprofits, and public sector organizations. Depending on a board’s current focus and challenges, different attributes may have greater relative importance at a given time.

    Selects and Guides Visionary Leadership
    Exemplified by:

    1. Holding the CEO (the designated senior leader) accountable for adherence to the organization’s values and mission
    2. Reviewing organizational vision, strategies, CEO performance, and systems for achieving ongoing organizational success
    3. Inspiring and motivating the organization to achieve high performance, with high employee engagement
    4. Encouraging authenticity, allowing leaders to admit to missteps and encouraging them to report bad news

    Ensures a Systems Perspective
    Exemplified by:

    1. Holding the CEO accountable for setting a systems perspective across the organization, guiding and assessing the organization holistically
    2. Requiring a focus on strategic direction and customers to improve overall performance
    3. Ensuring utilization of the larger ecosystem (partners, suppliers, customers, communities) in which the organization operates to achieve efficiency and innovation

    Holds Leaders Accountable for Customer-Focused Excellence
    Exemplified by:

    1. Holding leaders accountable for a customer-focused culture in the organization, integrating customer engagement and loyalty as a strategic concept
    2. Requiring leadership attention to changing and emerging customer and market requirements
    3. Holding leaders accountable for the organization’s development of innovative offerings and customer relationships that serve as a differentiator from competitors

    Values People
    Exemplified by:

    1. Reviewing organizational culture to ensure a focus on meaningful work, engagement, empowerment, accountability, development, and well-being of workforce members
    2. Holding leaders accountable for an organizational environment of safety
    3. Ensuring a culture of inclusivity that capitalizes on the diversity of the workforce and the Board

    Holds Leaders Accountable for Organizational Learning and Agility
    Exemplified by:

    1. Reviewing organizational capacity for rapid change and for flexibility in operations
    2. Monitoring the organization’s ability to manage risk and make transformational changes despite ever-shorter cycle times
    3. Holding leaders accountable for embedding learning and improvement in the way the organization operates

    Focuses on Organizational Success (Sustainability)
    Exemplified by:

    1. Working with leaders to create a focus on short- and longer-term factors that affect the organization, its reputation, its stakeholders, and its future marketplace success, including needed core competencies and skills
    2. Accomplishing strategic succession planning for topmost leaders, selecting the CEO, and setting appropriate compensation
    3. Focusing on the “big picture,” ensuring that organizational planning anticipates future marketplace, economic, and technological influences and disruptions

    Guides the Organization for Innovation
    Exemplified by:

    1. Holding leaders accountable for an environment where strategic opportunities are identified, and the workforce is supported in taking intelligent risks

    Governs by Fact
    Exemplified by:

    1. Compelling the organization to measure performance both inside the organization and in its competitive environment
    2. Ensuring that data and analysis are used in operational and strategic decision making
    3. Challenging leaders and the organization to extract larger meaning from data and information
    4. Conducting audits and overseeing financial controls

    Encourages Societal Contributions
    Exemplified by:

    1. Acting as a governance role model for public and community responsibility
    2. Holding leaders accountable for organizational actions leading to societal well-being and benefit, thereby contributing to organizational success
    3. Motivating the organization to excel beyond minimal compliance with laws and regulations

    Ensures Ethics and Transparency
    Exemplified by:

    1. Demonstrating and requiring highly ethical behavior in all board and organizational activities and interactions
    2. Governing with transparency through open communication of clear and accurate information
    3. Holding leaders accountable for open communication of clear and accurate organizational information

    Ensures a Focus on Delivering Value and Results
    Exemplified by:

    1. Driving the organization to achieve excellent performance results
    2. Driving the organization’s leaders to exceed stakeholder requirements and achieve value for all stakeholders
    3. How do members of your Board Of Directors or your Advisory Body perform relative to these attributes and behaviors? Are they fulfilling all their responsibilities? Are they going beyond their roles and stepping into “leadership” roles? Would a discussion or self-assessment using these attributes enhance Board performance? This could start their journey into building a high performing organization in collaboration with the organization’s senior leaders.

  4. Best Practice Report: Leadership: Building a Successful Organisation

    September 9, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

    While there are many different approaches to building a successful organisation, there are usually two common ingredients: a strong culture of excellence, and a system to enable and manage change effectively. These two ingredients often involve the following elements:

    • An environment to enable your mission to succeed and improve organisational and leadership performance, organisational learning, as well as learning for the workforce.
    • A workforce culture that delivers a consistently positive customer experience and fosters customer engagement.
    • An environment to enable innovation and intelligent risk taking, the achievement of your strategic objectives, and organisational agility.
    • Active participation in succession planning and the development of future organisational leaders.

     
     
     
     
     
    In This Report:

    1. what does building a successful organisation mean?
    2. which organisations have received recognition for being ‘a successful organisation’?
    3. how have leaders built a highly successful organisation?
    4. what research has been undertaken into how to build a successful organisation?
    5. what tools and methods are used to build highly successful organisations?
    6. how can a successful organisation be measured?
    7. what do business leaders say about building a successful organisation?
    8. conclusion

    Access the report from here. At the bottom of the page is a PDF version of the report for easy reading. If you are a non-member, you will find some of the links in this report do not work. To join BPIR.com and support our research simply click here or to find out more about membership, email membership@bpir.com. BPIR.com publishes a new best practice every month with over 80 available to members.


  5. Book release: Be a Frontline H.E.R.O.

    June 25, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited
    For a review copy of the bookor an interview with the author, please contact Dr. Cyndi (Crother) Laurin, at +1-480-717-9612 or Cyndi@guidetogreatness.com.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Moving the Frontline Forward: Engaging Your Employees to Provide an Optimal Customer Outcome through Improving the Overall Manager Experience

    Do you know someone who was very good at their job, and as a result was promoted into management without any people training? Maybe you’ve promoted an employee into management assuming they could hack it. Despite our best intentions, truth of the matter is most managers are not equipped to handle the people piece. The author of Be a Frontline HERO – a new book providing simple and accessible frontline management tools – tells a story we can all relate to that managers can incorporate in the same day and see immediate results.

    While innovative products and efficient processes are still the primary focus of most leaders, we know what really keeps a company competitive is its people. For over twenty years, the Gallup poll identifies approximately two-thirds of the workforce as not engaged in their work. Best said by Gallup’s CEO, Jim Clifton, in the State of the American Workplace Report:

    “The single biggest decision you make in your job – bigger than all the rest – is who you name manager. When you name the wrong person manager, nothing fixes that bad decision. Not compensation, not benefits – nothing.”

    Nearly the same percentage of people leaves their job, or plan to leave, as a direct result of the quality of the relationship with their direct supervisor. In August 2018, Randstad US released research determining the primary reasons workers chose to leave, most all of them were related to “…intangible benefits and day-to-day experiences at work…”. In October 2018, Inc.com noted the Randstad US article and summed it by saying, “Why people quit really boils down to one word…Disrespect.”

    Why does all of this matter? According to Dr. Cyndi Laurin, author of Be a Frontline HERO: A Parable to Propel your Job and Life (June 2019, ISBN 978-1098586089). “If employees are walking out the door because of bad management, they’re clearly not engaged in the work at hand, making an optimal customer outcome nearly impossible.” She goes on to say, “If we can right the ship with regard to improving the manager experience, workers will be more likely to engage, and at the end of the day, the customer wins.”

    And don’t think for a moment that this is all touchy-feely, Kumbaya work. There is a direct correlation between culture and the bottom line. If the company is bleeding out due to high turnover, poor quality, unhappy employees, and an ineffective culture, customers are going to feel the pain as well and take their business elsewhere.

    So here’s the real issue: How do you give your most valuable asset (your managers) the resources they need to quickly become effective without spending tons of money on training and months of time to see results? Reading Be a Frontline HERO is a great place to start. It tells the story of the main character, Emily, finding herself promoted to manager at a local pizzeria. While excited about the new challenge, she quickly realizes she’s in way over her head. Giving and soliciting regular feedback with her former peers, trying to establish standards and set expectations, and “faking it until she makes it” leaves her feeling both overwhelmed and exhausted.

    On the brink of quitting, an unlikely customer makes Emily an offer she can’t refuse. Five easy tools with very specific language to follow, and Emily learns how to provide meaningful feedback, how to get her team on the same page in less than ten minutes, and how to prioritize which issues to tackle right away and which to block for later. With her new H.E.R.O. tool belt, Emily is well on her way to becoming an effective manager.

    Here is some context supporting the book’s insights on how to provide an optimal customer outcome through improving the overall manager experience:

    • Management is the practice of observation and providing clear, regular feedback. The old (yet still prevalent) command-and-control style of management is antithetical to creating a culture where employees can engage in work that allows the customer to experience an optimal outcome. Without a system to manage others, people tend to default to how they were parented. Parenting your employees is not managing them. Three of the five tools in Be a Frontline HERO (Position to Notice, Keep it Up, and Adjust) provide both reinforcing and corrective language to support desired behaviors.
    • Many employees only receive feedback when they are doing something wrong (hence, it feels like being parented). Dr. Laurin shared, “Over the past 25 years, I have found that many employees want to be trusted and valued and told when they are doing something right as well as how to correct doing something that isn’t moving the business forward.” Behavioral research supports offering three opportunities for supporting desired behaviors to every one opportunity to adjust undesired behaviors.
    • When asked, you would be surprised at how few employees actually know how their work aligns to the overall business objectives. “Without that connection, it’s hard to engage in meaningful work,” says Dr. Laurin. “Be a Frontline HERO includes a tool to get your team on the same page in under ten minutes and stay on track throughout the day (Position to Notice, a.k.a. Walkabout).”
    • One of the most challenging aspects of managing is being able to decipher what issues need to be resolved immediately, and which ones can safely wait until a later time. As a frontline manager, issues with employees, customers, and inventory can be difficult to prioritize without a tool or system. One of the tools addresses this exact challenge and offers simple steps to ensure effective management of time (Block or Tackle).

    This brings us to the true appeal of Be a Frontline HERO. Written as a narrative, the book is a quick and easy yet powerful read, and the content can be implemented immediately. It’s not only a highly effective for new frontline leaders but can serve as a valuable model for experienced leaders as well. It’s an interesting and fun read about a scenario that anyone can relate to.

    “I believe the time is now to move frontline leadership forward,” says Dr. Laurin. “Many of us get promoted into a leadership role at some point or another without any guidance on how to manage people, and unless you are lucky enough to work for a company that invests in practical management guidance and support, Be a Frontline HERO can provide five simple tools that you can literally start using in the same day and see immediate results.”

    About the Author:
    Cyndi (Crother) Laurin, Ph.D. is the author of bestselling Catch! A Fishmonger’s Guide to Greatness (2005) and The Rudolph Factor: Finding the Bright Lights that Drive Innovation in Your Business (2009). She is a sought after keynote speaker, Chief Training Officer for AMP Services, and is also the Director for the undergraduate Business Administration Programs at Benedictine University Mesa. More information about her can be found at www.Linkedin.com/in/cyndilaurin.