1. Baldrige Award Winners 2018

    November 16, 2018 by ahmed

    Originally posted on NIST

    Washington, D.C.—The U.S. Department of Commerce announced today that the 2018 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award will be given to two educational institutions, an organ donor group, a hospital and a project management firm. A presidential-level honor, the award recognizes exemplary U.S. organizations and businesses that demonstrate an unceasing drive for radical innovation, thoughtful leadership, and administrative improvement.

    “These awardees are inspiring in so many ways,” said Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Director Walter G. Copan. “Each honoree strengthens our economy through its organizational excellence and positive impacts for its customers, students, patients and employees. They exemplify the American spirit in action and are role models for success in business and commerce.”

    The 2018 honorees are as follows:

    • Alamo Colleges District, San Antonio, Texas (education)
    • Donor Alliance, Denver, Colorado (nonprofit)
    • Integrated Project Management Company, Inc., Burr Ridge, Illinois (small business)
    • Memorial Hospital and Health Care Center, Jasper, Indiana (health care)
    • Tri County Tech, Bartlesville, Oklahoma (education)

    NIST manages the Baldrige Award in cooperation with the private sector. An independent panel of judges reviewed the evaluations performed by the board of examiners and recommended this year’s Baldrige Award recipients from a field of 27 finalist applicants, each of whom had prequalified by winning a Baldrige-based performance excellence award at the state or regional level.

    “We are very pleased to honor these five outstanding organizations with this presidential award,” said Copan. “Using the proven Baldrige framework, each organization charts its own course to achieve verified performance excellence, and as a result we all benefit through economic growth and U.S. leadership.”

    The 2018 Baldrige Awards will be presented at a ceremony on April 7, 2019, during the Baldrige Program’s 31st annual Quest for Excellence® conference, which will be held in National Harbor, Maryland.

    The expert Baldrige judges evaluate organizations in seven areas defined by the Baldrige Excellence Framework: leadership; strategy; customers; measurement, analysis and knowledge management; workforce; operations; and results. An organization may compete for the award in one of six categories: manufacturing, service, small business, health care, education and nonprofit (including government agencies).

    Since 1987, the Baldrige Award has been the highest recognition for performance excellence in the nation. There are now more than 30 independent Baldrige-based state, regional, and sector award programs covering nearly all 50 states. Internationally, there are nearly 80 programs based in whole, or in part, on the Baldrige Program. In addition, many organizations use the Baldrige framework as a leadership and management guide to drive improvement and innovation strategies. The Baldrige framework is reviewed and updated regularly to reflect best practices in organizational leadership and performance across key organizational categories that drive the U.S. economy and enhance our quality of life.

    Over the years, millions of copies of the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence, the core of the Baldrige framework, have been distributed or downloaded. This widespread acceptance and use both nationally and globally have dramatically impacted all types of organizations.

    Below is a sample of the achievements of the 2018 Baldrige Award winners.

    The Alamo Colleges District (ACD)
    ACD is the largest institution of higher learning in South Texas, serving over 100,000 students enrolled in for-credit, continuing education and workforce courses every year. Students can earn associate degrees and can also transfer to four-year universities. ACD holds a rare AAA bond rating, based on the strength of its financial policies for managing debt and evolving sources of revenue. Simultaneously, ACD students’ four-year graduation rate has increased 150 percent since 2009, and students have given the institution’s advisor program a 94 percent effectiveness rating.

    Donor Alliance (DA)
    DA’s mission is to save lives through organ and tissue donation and transplantation. Covering the third largest physical area of any organ donation and transplant support network in the nation, DA has increased its organ donations steadily over the past five years. DA’s results, including some of the nation’s highest donor designation rates, directly translate to more lives saved and healed through transplantation. Donor families, as well as transplant center and tissue processor customers, gave DA a 100 percent satisfaction rating. At the same time, DA has increased its revenues and realized organ donor cost savings between 63 and 73 percent.

    Integrated Project Management Company, Inc. (IPM)
    IPM is a privately held business consulting company, providing leadership to transform strategies and solutions into sustainable results. While growing its revenue more than 60 percent since 2013, IPM achieved a 99 percent customer satisfaction rating from 2015 to 2017, and 94 percent of its employees rated it a “great place to work.”

    Memorial Hospital and Health Care Center (MHHCC)
    MHHCC provides inpatient and outpatient care through an acute care community hospital and 32 outpatient primary and specialty care clinics and medical practices, providing medical care for 6,600 inpatients and 254,000 outpatients through 29,000 emergency department visits annually. MHHCC has received an “A” in hospital safety since 2016. MHHCC has also received a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) five-star rating for overall quality of inpatient care since the ratings were released.

    Tri County Tech (TCT)
    One of 29 public technology centers in the Oklahoma Career and Technical Education System, TCT serves the residents of three counties and has a vision of inspiring success through life-changing learning experiences. With a goal that no student should be denied an education due to inability to pay, TCT provides scholarships and funding for student expenses such as medication, gasoline, clothing and food. TCT has sustained top 25 percent national rankings for student completion/retention and placement for eight fiscal years. The institution also increased graduate wages to well above the national average while growing its own revenues 16 percent since 2009—without federal funding and despite a sizable reduction in state funding.

    Best-Practice Awards
    The Baldrige judges also may recognize best practices in one or more of the Baldrige Criteria categories by organizations that are candidates for the award but are not selected as winners. This year, the judges have chosen two organizations for this honor (listed with the categories for which they are acknowledged):

    Howard Community College in Columbia, Maryland, is recognized for its role-model practices in leadership.

    Mary Greeley Medical Center in Ames, Iowa, is recognized for its role-model practices related to its patients and other customers.

    The Baldrige Program raises awareness about the importance of performance excellence in driving the U.S. and global economies; provides organizational assessments, training, tools and criteria; educates leaders in businesses, schools, health care organizations and government and nonprofit organizations; shares the best practices of national role models; and recognizes those role models with the Baldrige Award. The Baldrige Program is a public-private partnership managed by NIST and funded in part through user fees and support from the Baldrige Foundation.

    The Baldrige Award was established by Congress in 1987 and is not given for specific products or services. Since the first group was recognized in 1988, 123 awards have been presented to 115 organizations (including eight repeat winners).


  2. The Baldrige criteria are insufficient

    November 9, 2018 by ahmed

    Originally posted by Harry Herts on Blogrige

    For people who have known me for years, you probably never thought you would hear me say, “The Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence are an insufficient guide for achieving improvement and, hopefully, excellence.” But the statement is true and it is not a new epiphany for me. The Criteria ask how your organization accomplishes everything it needs to do and define what that “everything” is. How has a simple meaning in most contexts: a description of your approach or method. But that is not the full meaning of how, when you are characterizing an organizational process. The full meaning is revealed when the Criteria are combined with the Baldrige Scoring Guidelines which add dimensionality to how. Then the picture is both sufficient and all-encompassing.

    Before continuing the explanation, let me provide context by explaining why I am writing this blog…

    My Email Exchange
    I recently had a very thoughtful email exchange with Bob Scanlon, a long-time Baldrige examiner, senior examiner, and alumni examiner. The basic topic was new and improved process adoption in an organization, process standardization throughout the organization, and adoption of benchmarked processes in large, geographically dispersed organizations (and smaller ones, as well). The basic problem is that well-defined processes are not uniformly and effectively deployed throughout the organization, and improvements are frequently localized or reinvented at multiple places in an organization. Knowledge transfer is poor and a lot of rework or inefficiencies occur. Bob’s thought-provoking question was, are new how questions needed in the criteria to address these issues?

    The Meaning of How
    After giving Bob’s question some thought, my answer was “no.” We do not need new Criteria questions to address these issues. The answer lies in responding to the existing process questions and understanding the meaning of how, which the Baldrige Glossary of Key Terms defines as:

    How
    The systems and processes that your organization uses to achieve its mission requirements. You should include information on approach (methods and measures), deployment, learning, and integration.

    Approach (A), Deployment(D), Learning (L), and Integration (I) or ADLI are the four dimensions of the Baldrige process item scoring guidelines. The proper answer to a how question requires information on the approach, including

    • measures of effectiveness and efficiency
    • deployment of the approach to relevant work units throughout the organization
    • learning through cycles of evaluation and improvement, innovation, and sharing with all relevant work units
    • integration by aligning the approach with organizational needs and harmonizing plans, processes, information, resource decisions, actions, and analyses to support organization-wide goals

    The ADLI dimensions are described in detail in the Baldrige Scoring Guidelines. Organizational maturity, by way of a score, is measured by progress in achieving these four ADLI dimensions. However, the ADLI dimensions are not merely a scoring companion to the Baldrige Criteria; they provide the defining characteristics of the word how. The Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence are insufficient if one does not understand the meaning of how and its role in defining process excellence. This meaning and role in performance excellence is described in the Scoring Guidelines. Therefore, they should be used as an integral part of Criteria implementation, even if your organization is not trying to score your level of performance.

    The questions posed in Bob Scanlon’s email are addressed by the deployment and learning dimensions of responding to how.

    The next logical question might be, “Are the Scoring Guidelines also important in answering the results questions in the Criteria?”

    What about Results?
    The same concept of Criteria and Scoring Guidelines complementarity applies to the meaning of what, when asking what are your results. What are your results has a simple meaning in most contexts: tell me your level of performance. To understand the full meaning of what when describing results, organizations should look at the scoring dimensions for results: Levels (Le), Trends (T), Comparisons (C), and Integration (I), or LeTCI (Let’s see our progress). The proper answer to a results question requires information about the

    • level of current performance
    • trend in your performance over time (Are you getting better, worse, or staying the same?)
    • comparison of your organization’s performance to that of competitors, or other similar organizations, or, possibly, best-in-class performance
    • integration, the extent to which your results measures address important performance requirements relating to products, customers, markets, processes, action plans, and organization-wide goals

    Systems Perspective
    When your organization defines and standardizes a process, do you truly define how it will be accomplished? When your organization assesses its results, do you truly measure what has been accomplished? ADLI and LeTCI complement the Baldrige Criteria and permit the systems perspective.


  3. Best Practice Report: Benchmarking

    November 6, 2018 by ahmed
    Benchmarking is a process to identify and implement best, better or new practices, with the objective of providing greater stakeholder value and obtaining a competitive advantage. It is a way of discovering the best performance and practices of other organisations, and then learning, adapting, creating, and implementing high-performing practices to produce superior performance results.

    benchmarking is the most effective and widely used way for companies of all sizes to improve performance and gain a critical advantage. Every organisation can learn and improve its business performance, no matter how strong its business model or end-of-year results. Even confirmed global leaders such as Xerox, Starbucks, and PepsiCo confirm the importance of benchmarking to staying one step ahead of their competition.

     
     
     
     
     

    In This Report:

    1. What is benchmarking?
    2. Which organisations have received recognition for excellence in benchmarking?
    3. How have organisations reached high levels of success in benchmarking?
    4. What research has been undertaken into benchmarking?
    5. What tools and methods are used to achieve high levels of success in benchmarking?
    6. How can benchmarking be measured?
    7. What do business leaders say about benchmarking?
    8. Conclusion

    Access the report from here. At the bottom of the page is a PDF version of the report for easy reading. If you are a non-member, you will find some of the links in this report do not work. To join BPIR.com and support our research simply click here or to find out more about membership, email membership@bpir.com. BPIR.com publishes a new best practice every month with over 80 available to members.


  4. Learning from Role Models: Category 6: Operations

    October 29, 2018 by ahmed

    Originally posted by Dawn Bailey on Blogrige

    Part of the purpose of Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act of 1987 (Public Law 100-107) is to disseminate information about the successful strategies and programs of Baldrige Award-winning organizations that “practice effective quality management and as a result make significant improvements in the quality of their goods and services.” Such sharing by Baldrige Award recipients is done face-to-face and with the option of asking questions of and networking with these recipients at the Annual Quest for Excellence® Conference, as well as at the Baldrige Fall Conference. Baldrige Award recipients also often host sharing days after their wins to share best practices.

    What is Category 6?
    Category 6 of the Baldrige Criteria covers your organizations operations.

    Category 6: Operations
    The Operations category asks how your organization designs, manages, improves, and innovates its products and work processes and improves operational effectiveness to deliver customer value and achieve ongoing organizational success.

    The management of your key products, your key work processes, and innovation can create value for your customers and help you achieve current and future organizational success. In addition, how you ensure effective operations can lead to a safe workplace and patient and student environment. Effective operations frequently depend on controlling the overall costs of your operations and maintaining the reliability, security, and cybersecurity of your information systems.

    Baldrige Award Recipient Best Practices
    Following are some practices shared by Baldrige Award recipients (Momentum Group, MidwayUSA, and Adventist Health Castle) in the realms of quality improvement, process management/performance, supply chain management, and patient-focused delivery of health care. What could your organization learn/adapt?

    Momentum Group
    2016 Baldrige Award Recipient, Small Business

    Momentum Group is a recognized leader in the commercial interiors industry, creating exclusive, design-focused fabrics for customers that include architectural and design firms, and commercial furniture manufacturers. One of its successful programs is its Quality Process Improvement System, which is used as a consistent operating path for initiatives, such as forming a quality leadership team, developing problem solving groups, providing all employees with quality training, and benchmarking and implementing a best-in-class recognition program.

    The system has led to investments in process upgrades that have reduced sample production time by 50 percent and improved sample yield per yard by 20 percent.

    Additionally, Momentum Group identifies six core processes and five support processes and has adapted the Baldrige Criteria to what would work internally for the organization. An annual Baldrige-based self-assessment process is used by all 11 core and support workgroups. Following a prescribed format used for the past 16 years, Momentum Group has each assessment externally reviewed.

    MidwayUSA
    2015 Baldrige Award Recipient, Small Business

    MidwayUSA, an Internet retailer offering “Just About Everything”® for shooting, hunting, and the outdoors, uses the questions of Baldrige Criteria category 6 to guide its goals of delivering stakeholder key requirements, improving proactively, understanding process interactions, becoming sustainable, and managing for innovation.

    A key area in category 6 is supply-chain management. For MidwayUSA, highly effective supply chain management (see image 6.1 Work Processes for the steps and feedback look that the organization follows) has resulted in a nearly 83 percent in-stock product rate, which is difficult to achieve in MidwayUSA’s industry. It has also resulted in an increase in inventory turns (the number of times inventory is “turned over” as measured by the cost of goods sold divided by the average inventory) from 5.2 in 2004 to 7.8 in 2015.

    Process management has helped MidwayUSA maintain a satisfaction rate for its suppliers and partners at or near 94 percent each year from 2008 to 2015, a rate better than the 84 percent achieved by the company’s number one industry competitor.

    Adventist Health Castle
    2017 Baldrige Award Recipient, Health Care

    Adventist Health Castle is a community hospital system that provides inpatient and outpatient care to people who primarily live on the windward side of the Hawaiian island of O’ahu. It is one of 20 hospitals within the nonprofit, faith-based, Adventist Health system headquartered in Roseville, CA.

    Adventist Health Castle sets service and process requirements at top decile whenever benchmarks are available. This has led to a pursuit of quality improvement for the benefit of its customers, “chasing zero” harm to its patients. As a result, it boasts rates from below 1 percent to zero for common hospital-acquired infections (i.e., catheter-associated urinary tract infection [CAUTI], central line-associated bloodstream infection [CLABSI], surgical site infections [SSI], and Clostridium difficile bacterial infections), as well as patient falls. Adventist Health Castle has been a top performer nationally for having had zero CAUTI infections in its inpatient units for the last 3 years and 5 months. Adventist Health Castle’s ICU is performing in the top 10 percent of ICUs nationwide, with a CLABSI rate of zero for four of the last five years.

    The hospital addresses safety through its Environment of Care Committee, Patient Safety Council, daily Safety Huddle, associate education, and inte­grated patient care. For a safe environment, it prioritizes patient safety, regulatory requirements, cost, relationship to its mission/vision/values, and the importance to customers. The Chasing Zero images show some of the steps it takes to ensure safety.


  5. TRADE best practice benchmarking workshops

    September 15, 2018 by admin

    Upcoming workshops in 2018

    • Dec 13 – 14: Benchmarking for Excellence, Abu Dhabi, UAE. (more info)

     
     

    Many finalists and winners of the GBN’s Global Benchmarking Award have been users of the TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking Methodology – the methodology developed by the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER). To watch 2016 Winner’s video click here.

    To organise a public TRADE workshop in your country or an In-house Workshop contact the trainer and founder of TRADE, Dr Robin Mann, r.s.mann@massey.ac.nz. Click here for more information on TRADE and its certification scheme.

    Past workshops in 2018

    • Jan 7 – 9: TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking (Dubai We Learn), Dubai
    • Jan 16 – 18: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai
    • June 24 – 26: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai

    Past workshops in 2017

    • Mar 26 – 28: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai
    • Apr 11 – 13: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai
    • Apr 16 – 18: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai
    • Apr 25 – 26: Benchmarking for Excellence, India
    • Sept 10 – 12: TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking (Dubai We Learn), Dubai. (For Dubai government entities only as part of the Dubai Government Excellence Programme).

    Past workshops in 2016

    • Jan 19 – 21: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai
    • Apr 14 – 15: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • Apr 26 – 28: TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking (Dubai We Learn), Dubai. (For Dubai government entities only as part of the Dubai Government Excellence Programme).
    • May 16 – 19: Benchmarking for Excellence in the Public Sector, Pasig City or Tagaytay City, Philippines.
    • Dec 12 – 14: Benchmarking for Excellence, Philippines

    Past workshops in 2015

    • Mar 26 – 27: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • Apr 22 – 23: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai – UAE (more info)
    • Apr 29 – 30: Benchmarking for Excellence, Muscat – Oman (more info)
    • Jun 1 – 2: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai
    • Sept 7 – 9: TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking (Dubai We Learn), Dubai. (For Dubai government entities only as part of the Dubai Government Excellence Programme).
    • Sept 14 – 16: Benchmarking for Excellence, Manila, Philippines.
    • Sept 21 – 23: Benchmarking for Excellence, Tagatay, Philippines.
    • Sept 28 – 29: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • Dec 1 – 3: Benchmarking for Excellence, Manila, Philippines.

    Past workshops in 2014

    • March 26 – 27: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai (more info)
    • April 24 – 25: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • April 28 – 29: Benchmarking for Excellence, Subang – Malaysia (more info)
    • Aug 12 – 13: Benchmarking for Excellence, Wellington – New Zealand (more info)
    • Sept 24 – 25: Benchmarking for Excellence, Abu Dhabi – UAE (more info)
    • Oct 8 – 9: Benchmarking for Excellence, Tehran – Iran (more info)
    • Oct 20 – 21: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai – UAE (more info)
    • Oct 22 – 23: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (more info)
    • Nov 20 – 21: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)

    Past workshops in 2013

    • March 7 – 8: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • March 19 – 20: Benchmarking for Excellence, Penang – Malaysia (more info)
    • May 30 – 31: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • September 25 – 26: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai – UAE (more info)
    • September 29 – 1 October: Benchmarking for Excellence, Abu Dhabi – UAE (more info)
    • October 9 – 10: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai – UAE  (more info)
    • October 23 – 24: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuala Lumpur – Malaysia  (more info)
    • November 18 – 19: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • November 21 – 22: Benchmarking for Excellence, Wellington – New Zealand (more info) (Registration form)


    Past workshops in 2012

    • January 10 – 11: Benchmarking for Excellence, Qatar (Workshop in Arabic)
    • March 1 – 2: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • March 14 – 15: TRADE Benchmarking Training, London – UK (more info)
    • March 20 – 21: TRADE Benchmarking Training, London – UK (more info)
    • March 27 – 28: Benchmarking for Excellence, Philippines (more info)
    • October 4 – 5: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • December 3 – 4: Benchmarking for Excellence, Auckland – New Zealand (more info)

    Past workshops in 2011

    • Jan 10 – 11: Benchmarking for Excellence, Tehran – Iran
    • Jan 13 – 14, 2011: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • Jan 17: Introduction to Benchmarking Using ‘T.R.A.D.E’ Methodology, Singapore (more info)
    • Feb 13 – 14: Benchmarking for Excellence, Abu Dhabi, UAE (more info)
    • Feb 20 – 22: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuwait (more info)
    • Feb 28 – 1 Mar, 2011: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • Mar 30 – 31: Benchmarking for Excellence, Wellington – New Zealand (more info)
    • May 8 – 10, 2011: Certified Benchmarking Training, Abu Dhabi, UAE (More Info)
    • May 11 – 12, 2011: Certified Benchmarking Training, Dubai, UAE (More Info)
    • June 27 – 29: Benchmarking for Excellence, Bahrain (more info)
    • July 7 – 8: Benchmarking for Excellence, Mumbai (more info)
    • July 19 – 21: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuala Lumpur (more info)
    • July 28 – 29: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • August 30 – 31: Benchmarking for Excellence, Wellington (more info)
    • September 28 – 30: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuala Lumpur
    • October 13 – 14: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore
    • November 27 – 29: Benchmarking for Excellence, Abu Dhabi – UAE (more info)
    • December 6 – 8: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuwait (more info)

    Past workshops in 2010

    • Apr 15 -16: Professional Benchmarking, Glasgow – UK (more info)
    • Apr 21 -22: Professional Benchmarking, London – UK (more info)
    • May 2 – 3: Professional Benchmarking – Bahrain (more info)
    • May 13 – 14: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • May 18 – 20: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuwait (more info)
    • Jun 7 – 8: Benchmarking for Excellence, Abu Dhabi, UAE (more info)
    • Aug 17 – 18: Benchmarking for Excellence, Auckland, New Zealand
    • Sep 16 – 17: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • Nov 30 -1 Dec: Professional Benchmarking, London – UK (more info)
    • September 17 – 18: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuala Lumpur – Malaysia  (more info)