1. Research reveals that 56 countries have an active business excellence awards program

    September 13, 2020 by BPIR.com Limited

    By Saad Ghafoor and Dr. Robin Mann, Centre for Organisational Excellence Research, September 2020.

    The Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER) recently updated its research on the number of active Business Excellence (BE) awards in the world.

    The new research revealed that 56 countries and 4 regions have active BE awards as of September 2020. In addition to these, 17 countries are running initiatives to encourage organisations on a BE journey. Therefore, in total 73 countries are promoting BE.

    Eligibility of an award to be considered as an active BE award

    BE awards were considered as “active” if:

    • they were based on a holistic BE framework and use similar assessment methods to internationally recognised frameworks such as the EFQM Excellence Model and the Baldrige Excellence Framework;
    • the award was run/held in 2018 or 2019 or planned for 2020 or 2021.

    Figure 1: The current EFQM Excellence Model

    Figure 2: The current Baldrige Excellence Framework

    To review the countries that have BE awards or initiatives click here. Please inform us if our information on your country’s award is incorrect or missing.

    The graph below shows the most common BE models for BE awards. Whilst there are 56 countries with active awards, some countries have more than one national award and there are also four international awards covering more than one country, these are Africa (Africa Excellence Award), Asia Pacific Quality Organisation (APQO), EFQM Excellence Award, and Iberoamerican Excellence Award (FUNDIBEC). Therefore, the graph shows the BE models used across a total of 71 awards.

    The EFQM Excellence Model is the most popular with 24 BE awards using it. Another 5 BE awards use unique BE models that resemble the EFQM Excellence Model. The Baldrige Excellence Framework is used by 11 BE awards with another 11 using BE frameworks that resemble the Baldrige Excellence Framework. Fourteen BE awards use a unique BE model/ framework. Two BECs (Sheikh Khalifa Government Excellence Program of the UAE and Egypt) use the Government Excellence Model (GEM) and two (Dubai Government Excellence Programme and Abu Dhabi Award for Government Excellence) use unique models resembling the GEM.

    The research on BE awards is part of a larger research study titled Excellence Without Borders (EWB) which was launched by COER in July 2018 and is supported by the Global Excellence Model Council. This research is investigating the current state of and best practices in designing BE frameworks/ models and promoting, facilitating, awarding, supporting, and measuring BE on a national/ regional and sectoral level.

    A total of 26 countries (and 29 BE custodian organisations) have participated in the project. BE custodians are organisations responsible for designing BEFs, and for promoting facilitating BE and BE awards in their countries. Some countries had more than one BE custodian organisation participating in the project such as the Dubai Government Excellence Program (DGEP), Sheikh Khalifa Excellence Award (SKEA), and the Dubai Economy Department (DED) in the United Arab Emirates.

    Initial EWB research findings are available here. Further findings are being made available through a series of academic research papers. It is envisaged that the research findings will lead to an improved understanding of BE and help BE Custodians to raise the profile and use of BE worldwide.


  2. Why “Why” Is the Fundamental Question

    September 9, 2020 by BPIR.com Limited

    Originally posted on Blogrige by Dawn Bailey

    I recently listened to a Ted talk by Simon Sinek, author of Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action, and it caused me to reflect on some key questions in and related to the Baldrige Excellence Framework, as well as leadership in general.

    Questions to Inspire
    The Criteria within the Baldrige Excellence Framework are all about questions—questions to bring about insight, to promote new ways of thinking, to identify gaps in an organization’s performance, and to inspire excellence. Other series of questions can be used to encourage organizations to consider the Baldrige framework. For example, if you are asked by an organization’s senior leaders why they should consider the framework as a means of self-assessment or continuous improvement, you might ask the senior leaders a series of questions (heard from examiners and other Baldrige community leaders):

    • Are you good?
    • Are you getting better?
    • How do you know?

    Or

    • What problem are you trying to solve?
    • What opportunity are you trying to achieve?
    • How are you going to measure that?

    These sets of questions—and the Criteria questions themselves—can lead an organization to paint a fuller picture of their entire business model, from leadership to results, thereby helping them to identify strengths on which to capitalize and opportunities for improvement in which to invest resources.

    But, when it comes to leadership, it’s the question “why” that is the most fundamental of all of the questions. According to the Baldrige framework,

    Although the Criteria focus on key organizational performance results, these results by themselves offer little diagnostic value. For example, if some results are poor or are improving at rates slower than your competitors’ or com­parable organizations’ results, you need to understand why this is so and what you might do to accelerate improvement.

    The World’s Simplest Idea
    In his book and Ted talk, Sinek puts forward what he calls “the world’s simplest idea,” and it all starts with “why.”

    We follow those who lead not because we have to, but because we want to . . . and it’s those who start with “why” that have the ability to inspire those around them or find others who inspire them. . . . If you hire people just because they can do a job, they’ll work for your money, but if they believe what you believe, they’ll work for you with blood, sweat, and tears.

    Sinek describes a golden circle with the word “why” in the very center and outer rings of “how” and “what.” In effective marketing materials, the most successful companies don’t start with what they provide or how they provide it, he said; they sell why you need their products.

    “When we communicate from the inside out [looking at the circle with why in the center], we’re talking directly to the part of the brain that controls behavior, and then we allow people to rationalize it with the tangible things we say and do,” he said. “As it turns out, all the great and inspiring leaders and . . . inspired organizations—regardless of their size, regardless of their industry—all think, act, and communicate from the inside out.”

    Sinek explains that people are inspired to buy something, work harder, take initiative, etc., because they believe not what the leader/organization is doing but why it is being done.

    “People don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it. . . . If you talk about what you believe, you will attract those who believe what you believe,” he said, citing Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. attracting hundreds of thousands to his famous Lincoln Memorial speech not because he had a plan but because he had a dream. He also tells the story of the Wright brothers, credited with inventing the world’s first successful motor-operated airplane, with no money, formal education, press, or market opportunity; what they had were supporters who believed what they believed.

    Leading by helping others understand your “why” is a much better recipe for success than having money, the right people, and the right market conditions, he said.

    Understand the Why
    The Baldrige framework emphasizes transparency as defined by consistently candid and open communication, accountability, and the sharing of clear and accurate information by leadership and management. According to the framework, the goal is to help employees understand the “why” of what they are doing. Such understanding helps employees feel connected to the organization’s mission, vision, and values. In the case of many organizations—especially nonprofits, health care organizations, and education organizations—an employee’s connection to why the organization does what it does is a workforce driver; employees who believe in the values and what the organization believes in—both an emotional and intellectual connection—will feel more loyalty to that organization.

    “Transparency is a key factor in workforce engagement and allows people to see why actions are being taken and how they can contribute. Transparency and accountability are also important in interactions with customers and other stake­holders, giving them a sense of involvement, engagement, and confidence in your organization,” according to the Baldrige framework.

    In many, many workforce presentations of Baldrige Award winners, I’ve heard about these role-model organizations prioritizing hiring for a match with their cultures and values over skills—attracting people who believe in why the organization does what it does, with values that match the organization’s own values. Here are just a few Blogrige examples: “Building Employee Trust: Tips Validated by the Baldrige Excellence Framework,” “Baldrige is Answer to How to Create the Culture You Need,” “Leadership Practices of Integrated Project Management, Inc.”, “One Way to Carve Your Values—and Culture—in Stone,” and “How Values, Quarterly Coaching Address Clinician Burnout, Improve Engagement.

    Sinek’s view is in alignment with the Baldrige framework. He said the goal for organizations is to “hire people who believe what you believe” and “do business with the people who believe what you believe.” That is how you build loyalty and inspire others.

    “If you do not know why you do what you do, and people respond to why you do what you do, then how will you ever get people to vote for you, or buy something from you, or, more importantly, be loyal and want to be a part of what it is that you do,” Sinek asked.

    Starting with the why, Sinek says, explains why some organizations and some leaders are able to inspire where others are not. People won’t truly buy into a product, service, movement, or idea until they understand the why behind it, he sums up.

    Do you know why you do what you do? Do your employees understand their why?


  3. South African Quality Institutes Quality Education News

    August 4, 2020 by BPIR.com Limited

    South African Quality Institute (SAQI) http://www.saqi.co.za is the national body that co-ordinates the Quality effort in South Africa. Quality Education News is a quarterly publication issued by the South African Qulaity Institute (SAQI) in the intrest of promoting educational excellence, SAQI publications are excellent source of information to keep up with the latest quality issues in South Africa.

    • During pandemics should there be marks and grades? by Richard Hayward
    • The KISS principle
    • How do we reduce their anxiety, fear and panic?
    • Upsides during lockdowns

    Click here to download this newsletter.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


  4. Kudos to My Kolleagues

    by BPIR.com Limited

    Originally posted on Blogrige by Harry Hertz

    OK, I took a little poetic license with the second “K” in the title; it looked nice! I can brag about the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program (BPEP) staff (including its leadership) because I am not part of the survey group below; I retired from Baldrige Performance Excellence Program (BPEP) employment in 2013.

    Employee Engagement
    The federal government conducts an annual survey of all federal employees. The results are in for 2019 and BPEP might well have set the benchmark for the government. I have to apologize because I cannot say that with certainty; all the comparative data I have are averages. (I feel the pain of all Baldrige Excellence Framework users who seek top quartile and top decile comparisons.) The survey had 71 questions. Results are reported by indices that aggregate by topic across survey categories, by overall category responses, and by individual engagement drivers.

    Let me share some results:


    Does it make sense to internalize the Baldrige Excellence Framework and make it the way you work? I would have to reply with a resounding “yes.” The most striking difference among the three groups is that BPEP uses the Baldrige Excellence Framework to guide its operations and decision making. While I can’t speak to the whole federal government, I do know that both NIST and BPEP strive to select the right people with the traits and baseline skills needed to fill their jobs. That might be part of the explanation why both NIST and BPEP exceed government-wide performance.

    Customer Engagement
    There are many studies that demonstrate a correlation between employee engagement and customer engagement. Let me share some customer results for BPEP’s customer engagement. I will first share some recent Net Promoter Scores (for comparison the NPS for Tesla is 97, Starbucks is 77, and USAA is 65):

    • Baldrige Executive Fellows Program 100
      Likelihood to recommend the Baldrige Excellence Framework 86
    • Baldrige Quest for Excellence Conference 59 (93% rated it valuable/very valuable)

    And here are some data from the survey of Baldrige Award applicants (over the life of the Program) on per cent of applicants who agreed that the use of Baldrige improved their:
    outcomes/results 100

    • revenue/market growth 96
    • customer satisfaction/engagement 100
    • workforce satisfaction/engagement/retention 100
    • community support/relationships 91

    Building Employee Engagement
    While there are detailed questions in the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence, let me share some basic workforce engagement questions from the Baldrige Excellence Builder, an introductory set of criteria questions. Considering these questions could help your organization achieve results like my colleagues (no k this time) have achieved:

    • How do you recruit, hire, and onboard new workforce members?
    • How do you organize and manage your workforce?
    • How do you determine the key drivers of workforce engagement?
    • How do you foster an organizational culture that is characterized by open communication, high performance, and an engaged workforce?
    • How do you manage career development for your workforce and your future leaders?

    And it all starts with the leadership:

    • How do senior leaders’ personal actions demonstrate their commitment to legal and ethical behavior?
    • How do senior leaders communicate with and engage the entire workforce, key partners, and key customers?
    • How do senior leaders create an environment for success now and in the future?
    • How do senior leaders create a focus on action that will achieve the organization’s mission?

    Finally, let me take the discussion to a “higher plane” and relate the challenges of workforce engagement to some of the Baldrige Core Values:

    Visionary Leadership
    Your organization’s senior leaders should set a vision for the organization, create a customer focus, demonstrate clear and visible organizational values and ethics, and set high expectations for the workforce

    Valuing People
    A successful organization values its workforce members and the other people who have a stake in the organization.

    Societal Contributions
    Your organization’s leaders should stress contributions to the public and the consideration of societal well-being and benefit.

    Ethics and Transparency
    Your organization should stress ethical behavior by all workforce members in all stakeholder transactions and interactions. Senior leaders should be role models of ethical behavior, including transparency.

    Obviously, no organization is perfect in all these considerations, including BPEP. However, honestly addressing them may be your next step toward higher performance. Again, my congrats to the wonderful Baldrige team!


  5. True Objective: To Drive Performance in Everything

    July 25, 2020 by BPIR.com Limited

    Originally posted on Blogrige by Dawn Bailey

    What does the continued success of a 150-year-old, multisector, multinational organization headquartered in India have to do with the Baldrige Excellence Framework?

    In the early 1990s, the then-chairman of the Tata Group, Ratan Tata, created the Tata Business Excellence Model (TBEM). TBEM is based on the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence (part of the Baldrige Excellence Framework), and since 1995, the holding group has conducted internal assessments, like the Baldrige Award process, for its more than 100 companies operating in ten industries: information technology, steel, automotive, consumer and retail, infrastructure, financial services, aerospace and defense, tourism and travel, telecom and media, and trading and investments.

    According to Ratan Tata, “The true objective of setting these criteria, however, was never meant to be merely to use them as an assessment for an award but, more importantly, to utilize them for an institutionalized approach to drive performance and attain higher levels of efficiency in everything that a corporate entity does.”

    Blogrige authors have written about Tata’s success with TBEM before in “’Making an Elephant Dance’: How the Baldrige Criteria Helped Transform a Global Conglomerate,” “Rediscover an Organization’s Potential with the ‘Baldrige Criteria’s Power,’” and “Tata’s Baldrige Advantage: A Multinational’s Model for Performance Excellence.

    This success and the company’s use of TBEM continues today.

    S. Padmanabhan Shares Some Insights on Using the TBEM

    According to S. Padmanabhan (Paddy), who runs the Tata Business Excellence Program, Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) recently was awarded “Iconic Company of the Decade” by India Business Leader Awards, named number one for customer satisfaction by its United Kingdom clients, and named number-one top employer by USA 2020.

    Within the Tata group, TCS has been a benchmark leader using TBEM, surpassing a 750-point (combined process and results scoring bands) milestone in its Baldrige-based 2019 assessments. As a comparison, see the 2019–2020 Scoring Band Descriptors (Word) that are part of the Baldrige Excellence Framework.

    I touched base with Paddy to see how the TBEM assessment process is working today and how this Baldrige-based model has brought value to the Tata companies.

    What is the purpose of TBEM?

    The purpose of the model was to have a consistent way “to face up to the significant economic changes being experienced in India specifically and the strong need to compete and excel among the world players,” according to a company presentation. “An institutionalized approach was the need of the hour to bring the hundred+ Tata entities together and become a globally recognized brand through world-class products and services.”

    How does the TBEM Baldrige-based assessment work?

    For the Baldrige-based, TBEM assessment, every Tata company that is a signatory to a brand agreement has to comply with achieving a total score in process and results items of 500 points within four years of signing the agreement.

    According to a company presentation, “Achieving 500 points was [once] considered a difficult task. . . . Within a few years of this being institutionalized, many companies started achieving this milestone.”

    Companies that score more than 650 come for assessments once every three years, companies with a score of 500 to 650 once every two years, and those below 500 every year. Tata companies are considered industry leaders with scores of 651 to 750, benchmark leaders with scores of 751 to 850, and world-class leaders with scores over 851, said Paddy.

    He added, “This serves the purpose for companies to continue to strive for excellence, as it is a never-ending journey, and even for achievers in the 650+ band, it is important to sustain their performance at high levels.”

    Paddy shared a quote from the chief executive officer of a Tata 650+ company,

    Some of the key benefits that our company has derived from using TBEM are focus on continuous improvement, process orientation, informed decision making, total picture, and measured risk taking. . . . Benefits have all paid dividends by changing the overall culture of the company. It has changed the organization from being merely impulsive and intuitive to being more informed and process oriented.

    According to a company presentation, for the mature Tata companies, “the assessment is a mirror. It gives them an opportunity to benchmark their processes and results and finally recognition and awards at a group level. . . . For newer companies, TBEM is a platform to learn from other Tata companies and improve processes and outcomes.”

    Said Paddy, all the five companies in the 650+ band have achieved significant success in their respective industries. “In many ways, the excellence has become a way of life and that is the biggest outcome and embodies the original philosophy of the then-group chairman in introducing TBEM for all Tata companies.”

    The TBEM assessment process is entirely conducted by Tata employees, and many companies encourage employees to conduct assessments as a part of their professional development, said Paddy.

    “For our employees, it is an aspirational leadership development platform. They get exposure to different industries and companies and an opportunity to interact with the leadership of companies. It is also a great networking opportunity,” he added.

    How have you shared learning/best practices across the company?

    Paddy said that Tata conducts learning missions to companies within the group and outside the group. Such learning is added to a knowledge portal that has more than 650+ practices covering all areas to address of the TBEM criteria from 50+ Tata companies, and it is available to all companies. In addition, every Wednesday, a webinar by a subject-matter expert is used to share expertise and knowledge; on May 13, 2020, Tata conducted its 250th webinar. Once every two months, a chief executive officer or a C-level executive of a Tata company conducts the webinar.

    Paddy said Tata also signed up for enterprise membership with APQC and organizational membership with ASQ for sharing and learning best practices and benchmarking global companies.

    What results have Tata companies achieved using the TBEM (Baldrige-based framework) as the basis for excellence efforts?

    According to Paddy, Tata companies have progressed despite the changing nature of business, the environment, and the market. He said, based on TBEM assessment scores, the group now has one Tata company as a benchmark leader, four as industry leaders, and twenty-four as emerging industry leaders.

    Group revenue was at $113 billion in FY2019, up from $110 billion in FY2018.

    “Our companies are becoming mature and striving to benchmark with the world’s best and aim for world-class performance in the chosen metrics,” he said. “This gives us an inspiration to go beyond what we can think of achieving now. . . . The journey is our destination.”

    Next steps for the TBEM assessments, according to a company presentation, are to customize engagements with Tata companies to suit an individual company’s context; to ensure data maturity in terms of availability, integrity, reliability, and accessibility; and to continue to explore best practices in the areas of data analytics, artificial intelligence, and the internet of things.

    Why do you think excellence matters in today’s economy?

    “Excellence as we understand it is not a destination at a point in time but a never-ending journey,” said Paddy. “An excellence framework like TBEM helps companies continuously introspect and hence increase the pace of change internally.”

    He added that the excellence framework helps companies focus on all key stakeholders and not just shareholders. “The emphasis on customers, workforce, society, and suppliers—apart from the shareholders—ensures balanced strategy, which does not get skewed by short-term focus on quarterly performances and enables companies to think long-term. In today’s times, this focus on the long-term and a balanced stakeholder focus are very crucial for the long-term success of companies.”