1. BPIR.com Newsletter: October 2019

    October 15, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

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    Book Launch – Celebrating 11 Benchmarking Success Stories from the 2nd Cycle of Dubai We Learn


    Continuing with its legacy of fostering excellence and imbibing a culture of organisational learning within the Government of Dubai, the Dubai Government Excellence Program (DGEP) in co-operation with the Center for Organizational Excellence Research (COER), New Zealand completed the 2nd Cycle of the Dubai We Learn Excellence Makers Program in 2018. Back then, 11 Dubai Government entities embarked on a journey towards new horizons, which enabled them to be more resilient and agile in experimenting with and adopting efficacious strategies and best practices from around the world.

    Today, DGEP and COER are delighted to announce the release of their 2nd book together describing the 11 success stories and describing how each project team used the TRADE Benchmarking Methodology. The book is titled, “Achieving Performance Excellence Through Benchmarking and Organisational Learning”.

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    Featured Events

     

    Latest News

    • Dubai Police: Still flying the Seven Stars…. read more
    • Are You A Role Model Leader?…. read more
    • Dubai Health Authority: Still flying the Seven Stars…. read more
    • Dubai Government Human Resources (DGHR): Still flying the Seven Stars…. read more
    • Thirty Years of Evolution = Revolutionary Change…. read more

     

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    Employee Involvement at Baldrige award winner


    The strategic planning process at Stellar Solutions, a US based provider of aerospace solutions, was grounded in its vision; identified critical customer needs; was aligned with employees’ dream jobs; was highly integrated through other key processes including employee development and individual incentive planning; and driven by employees to keep them engaged in the future success of Stellar. Part of ensuring a long-term planning focus was a questionnaire about employees’ perception of the work environment and potential opportunities or challenges. Employees answered these questions and shared responses at strategic plan meetings. Key strategic plan elements were determined at the meetings and Ideas from the meetings become the draft strategic plan for each sector. In alignment with specific goals in the strategic plan, individual incentive plans were used to evaluate employees. Stellar was a 2017 Baldrige Award Recipient.

     

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    Leadership System at award winning organ procurement organisation

    Leaders at Donor Alliance (DA), a US non-profit organ procurement organisation, focussed on performance and action supported by a strong workforce culture that flowed from the Leadership System. The foundation of the Leadership System was DA’s Mission “Donor Alliance saves lives through organ and tissue donation and transplantation.” DA’s vision of maximizing all donation opportunities was supported by the values of integrity, leadership, excellence, accountability, and people first. DA’s Core competencies of mission-driven and relationships provided the atmosphere where mission, vision, values interconnected with the workforce, key customers, stakeholders, and partners. The strategic direction was set by senior leaders and the Board of Directors in collaboration with leadership, and workforce strategies were developed, aligned, and deployed with ongoing evaluation that drove continual improvement. DA was a 2018 Baldrige National Quality Award Recipient.

    Do you know that there are more than 85 best practice reports available in BPIR.com? And increasing…

    BPIR Tip of the Month – Best practice case studies

    Award Winners Reports

    Did you know that a free best practice report is published on the BPIR every month? To see how to access these reports watch this clip. Over 85 Best Practice Reports, provide case studies and innovative ideas that will help you stay up-to-date concerning the latest international business trends and practices.

     

                                 


  2. Dubai Police: Still flying the Seven Stars

    October 3, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

    – A revisit of ‘Dubai We Learn’ Exemplar Benchmarking Projects –

    By Professor Dotun Adebanjo and Dr Robin Mann

    The great appeal of benchmarking is its ability to enable organisations to identify best practices from other organisations and adopt or adapt those practices to improve performance. The benchmarking process itself can be both demanding and exciting as the benchmarking team seeks to understand their organisation’s performance; identify, shortlist and visit benchmarking partners; determine the most suitable best practices; and work with internal (and sometimes external) stakeholders to implement the best practices.

    Although many aspects of the benchmarking process can be underpinned or driven by prescriptive guidelines and also managed along pre-determined timelines, the implementation of best practices is less amenable to prescriptiveness and time limitation. This is principally because the numbers, nature, scope and ease of implementation will vary significantly with the type of project and particulars of the organisation. Indeed, where many best practices are selected for implementation, it may be necessary and beneficial to implement the practices in stages or batches. It is also important to note that the benchmarking process does not end with the identification of best practices or indeed their implementation, it is also necessary to evaluate if the desired outcomes have been achieved and if not, to understand why and refine the practices as necessary.

    With this in mind, we returned to a sweltering Dubai in August 2019, 15 months after the completion of the second round of ‘Dubai We Learn’ (DWL) to visit three exemplar ‘7 Stars’ projects. ‘Dubai We Learn’ is an initiative of the Dubai Government Excellence Programme (DGEP) in collaboration with the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER) based at Massey University New Zealand. The second round of ‘Dubai We Learn’ benchmarking projects consisted of 11 projects in different Dubai Government entities and took place between March 2017 and April 2018. Details of the 11 projects and their achievements by April 2018 are available in an e-book (to be published soon). Three of the eleven benchmarking projects were 7 stars for benchmarking proficiency based on the TRADE Benchmarking Methodology that was adopted to drive the DWL projects.

    So, 15 months on, how have Dubai Government Human Resources (DGHR), Dubai Health Authority (DHA), and Dubai Police fared with their respective projects.

    Case No. 3 – Dubai Police
    The Dubai Police project was entitled, ‘Call of Duty: Police Edition – Best practices in vehicle fleet maintenance’. The aim of the project was to ‘To find and implement best practices in vehicle fleet maintenance to improve vehicle availability and labour productivity of the Dubai Police Mechanical Department to world class levels. The target was to increase labour productivity from 40% to 70% and increase vehicle availability from 88% to 95%.’ At the formal close of the benchmarking project in April 2018, the Dubai Police benchmarking team had identified 86 best practice ideas from benchmarking visits to 9 organisations and desktop research. Of the 86 best practices, 14 were approved for deployment.
    At the formal close of the benchmarking project in April 2018, the Dubai Police benchmarking team had achieved an increase in productivity from 40% to 72% and vehicle availability from 88% to 95% (Aug-2017 to Mar-2018) saving 14 million AED. There had also been an increase in average actual hours working on job tasks of each mechanic from 2.4 hours per day to 5 hours per day and a reduced average repair time per task by at least 5%. Dubai Police have produced a video of their involvement and achievements in the second round of ‘Dubai We Learn’ projects and this can be found here:

    Watch a video of Dubai Police’s benchmarking project

    What has happened since then?

    Dubai Police had met its key targets by April 2018. The purpose of our visit was to understand if they had maintained their achievements or built on them. Well, we were not disappointed. Dubai Police had not only maintained its performance levels, they had sought new ways to improve the maintenance of their fleet vehicles. In particular they had streamlined the delivery of parts and particularly high value parts. This had been achieved by working in partnership with parts suppliers and it meant that stock was now better managed to meet high demands and short lead-times. In addition, Dubai Police had also started to work more closely with agents from different car companies who are now based in the Dubai police workshop to work on the fleet vehicles to improve performance. KPIs per task have been set for the agents in order to improve efficiency. This has meant that Dubai Police technicians are now better able to concentrate on other maintenance tasks by having them removed from generic tasks such as tyre changing. Productivity and hours on repair jobs continue to be measured and monitored.

    Perhaps the most important outcome of Dubai Police’s involvement in the ‘Dubai We Learn’ initiative is the acceptance and widespread deployment of benchmarking and improvement activities based on the TRADE methodology. All departments and sections of Dubai Police are now set KPIs linked to benchmarking improvement. At the time of our visit, there were 254 live improvement projects throughout Dubai Police that were based on the tools and methodologies of TRADE. The departments and sections are encouraged to apply desktop benchmarking in their search for best practices. The management of the roll out of benchmarking across Dubai Police is managed by the Quality Department. In order to promote involvement and improve benchmarking skills and capabilities, Dubai Police held a 4-day TRADE seminar for 1000 police officers. The performance of the departments and sections of Dubai Police against the KPIs set are monitored on an annual basis and there is a General Commander Award for the best performers.

    The commitment of Dubai Police to continual improvement and the use of benchmarking as an improvement tool has led to significant external recognition of their performance and achievement. Further to the seven stars recognition at the end of the second round of the ‘Dubai We Learn’ initiative, Dubai Police’s project has been recognised at multiple awards:

    • Dubai Quality Group – First Place;
    • International Best Practice Award – Second Place;
    • Innovation Arabia – First Place;
    • Global Benchmarking Award – Second Place:
    • Commander Group – First Place
    • Knowledge Sharing Competition – First Place
    • Dubai Police Club – Shortlisted (awaiting final position)
    • Expo 2020 Global Best Practice Competition (awaiting final position)

    With Dubai Police’s strong commitment to benchmarking Dubai citizens can be assured that they are in the safe hands of a progressive Police Force. In the future, more awards and international recognition is likely to follow especially as some of the team members from this project are now serving as mentors for another Dubai Police team that are participating in the 3rd Cycle of Dubai We Learn on a project titled “Airport Secure Luggage (Safe Bags)”. This new project aims to find and implement best practices in airport baggage security to enhance efficiency and operational capacity of the inspection process at Dubai International Airport and Dubai World Central by Expo 2020. With 56 million bags handled and secured in 2018, Dubai Police are looking forward to another very successful project that will showcase their professionalism and leading-edge practices to the rest of the world.

    Read the other case studies, Dubai Government Human Resources (DGHR) and Dubai Health Authority (DHA).

    For more information on Dubai We Learn contact:

    Dr. Zeyad Mohammad El Kahlout, Senior Quality and Excellence Advisor, Dubai Government Excellence Program (DGEP). Email: Zeyad.ElKahlout@tec.gov.ae

     


  3. Book Launch – Celebrating the 11 Benchmarking Success Stories from the 2nd Cycle of Dubai We Learn

    October 2, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

    By Dr. Almas Tazein, BPIR.com Limited, COER

    Continuing with its legacy of fostering excellence and imbibing a culture of organisational learning within the Government of Dubai, the Dubai Government Excellence Program (DGEP) in co-operation with the Center for Organizational Excellence Research (COER), New Zealand completed the 2nd Cycle of the Dubai We Learn Excellence Makers Program in 2018. Back then, 11 Dubai Government entities embarked on a journey towards newer horizons, which enabled them to be more resilient and agile in experimenting with and adopting efficacious strategies and best practices from around the world.

    Today, DGEP and COER are delighted to announce the release of their 2nd book together describing the 11 success stories and describing how each project team used the TRADE Benchmarking Methodology. The book is titled, “Achieving Performance Excellence Through Benchmarking and Organisational Learning”

    Today, is the soft launch of the electronic version of the book. The official launch of the book will stimulatingly coincide with the Final Knowledge Sharing Summit for the 3rd Cycle of Dubai We Learn 2019 that will be held on 22 December 2019. The formal launch will be attended by all the Dubai Government teams, officials, sponsors and key stakeholders in the honorable attendance of the Secretary General of The Executive Council, Dubai.

    Where achieving 3-4 Stars and reaching TRADE Benchmarking Proficiency is a challenging task within a one-year timeframe, the book summarizes the secrets of how each of the 11 teams managed to reach up to the 3 to 7-Stars of governance par excellence. The book epitomizes an idealized step-wise implementation of TRADE methodology, depicting structure, purpose and performance.

    The book unravels the 2nd cycle of Dubai We Learn’s Excellence Makers Program from a knowledge-sharing perspective, where the reader will be exposed to a plethora of information in the field of public service and systematic benchmarking system. In order to spark a desire to learn from the challenges faced by the Dubai government entities, to showcase the principles and best practices that drove positive organisational change, to inculcate creativity and innovation within the teams, and to encourage the emulation of their success stories, the book speaks of the:

    • Key Achievements of each of the 11 benchmarking project teams
    • Project benefits classified into financial, customer/citizen, human resource, and process benefits
    • Lessons learnt and highlights from the TRADE Benchmarking Methodology
    • Importance of Leadership, Teamwork, and Change Management
    • Key factors integral to the success of the benchmarking projects during each of the T-R-A-D-E Stages.

    This book will make you think, it will make you question the status quo, and for sure, it will inspire you.

    Click here to download the book.

    Presentation video clips from each of the benchmarking projects are available in BPIR.com’s Award Winner Reports section. Join BPIR.com to access the reports and many other features.

    For more information on Dubai We Learn contact:

    Dr. Zeyad Mohammad El Kahlout, Senior Quality and Excellence Advisor, Dubai Government Excellence Program (DGEP). Email: Zeyad.ElKahlout@tec.gov.ae
     
     
     
    Or contact Dr Robin Mann to learn more about the TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking Methodology, r.s.mann@massey.ac.nz


  4. Are You A Role Model Leader?

    October 1, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

    Article originally posted on Blogrige by Harry Hertz

    What are the key attributes and behaviors for a role model, visionary leader? About six years ago, a task force of Baldrige community senior executives under the leadership of Kathy Herald-Marlowe was charged with drafting a set of senior leader attributes and behaviors consistent with the Baldrige Core Values, to be used by the Baldrige Foundation as criteria for a leadership award. Those leadership attributes and behaviors have been used subsequently as part of the learning discussions for the Baldrige Executive Fellows. Recently, I had the opportunity to update those attributes and behaviors based on revisions to the Baldrige Excellence Framework over the last several revision cycles. The revised attributes and behaviors are listed below for your consideration with your leadership team:

    VISIONARY LEADERSHIP

    1. Leads the organization in setting and owning organizational vision and values
    2. Guides the creation of strategies, systems, and methods to ensure ongoing organizational success
    3. Inspires the organization and partners to achieve high performance
    4. Demonstrates authenticity, admitting to missteps and opportunities for improvement

    SYSTEMS PERSPECTIVE

    1. Sets a systems perspective across the organization so that the organization and all its parts are viewed as a whole
    2. Causes holistic thinking and cross-functional synthesis, alignment, and integration
    3. Requires a focus on strategic direction and customers to improve overall performance
    4. Leads with recognition of the larger ecosystem (partners, suppliers, customers, communities) in which the organization operates

    CUSTOMER FOCUSED EXCELLENCE

    1. Builds a customer-focused culture and integrates customer engagement and loyalty as a strategic concept
    2. Creates a focus on anticipating changing and emerging customer and market requirements
    3. Ensures differentiation from competitors through the development of innovative offerings and unique relationships

    VALUING PEOPLE

    1. Builds and reinforces an organizational culture that focuses on meaningful work, engagement, accountability, development, and well-being of workforce members
    2. Creates an organizational environment that is safe, trusting, and cooperative
    3. Builds partnerships with internal and external people and stakeholder groups
    4. Builds a culture of inclusivity that capitalizes on the diversity of the workforce and partners

    ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING AND AGILITY

    1. Develops a capacity for rapid change and for flexibility in operations
    2. Leads and inspires the organization to manage risk and make transformational changes despite ever-shorter cycle times
    3. Creates an empowered workforce that effectively develops and uses evolving organizational knowledge
    4. Embeds learning in the way the organization operates

    FOCUS ON SUCCESS

    1. Creates a focus on short-and longer-term factors that affect the organization and its future marketplace success, including needed core competencies and skills
    2. Accomplishes strategic succession planning for leaders and workforce
    3. Ensures that organizational planning anticipates future marketplace, economic, and technological influences

    MANAGING FOR INNOVATION

    1. Builds an environment where strategic opportunities are identified, and the workforce is supported to take intelligent risks
    2. Fosters collaborative thinking among people who do not normally work together

    MANAGEMENT BY FACT

    1. Compels the organization to measure performance both inside the organization and in its competitive environment
    2. Uses data and analysis in operational and strategic decision making.
    3. Challenges the organization to extract larger meaning from data and information

    SOCIETAL CONTRIBUTIONS

    1. Acts as a role model for public responsibility and actions leading to societal well-being and benefit
    2. Motivates the organization to excel beyond minimal compliance with laws and regulations
    3. Drives environmental, social, and economic betterment of the community as a personal and organizational goal

    ETHICS AND TRANSPARENCY

    1. Requires highly ethical behavior in all organizational activities and interactions
    2. Leads with transparency through open communication of clear and accurate information
    3. Builds trust in the organization and its leaders

    DELIVERING VALUE AND RESULTS

    1. Leads the organization to achieve excellent performance results
    2. Defines and drives the organization to exceed stakeholder requirements and achieve value for all stakeholders

    How does your leadership team perform relative to these attributes and behaviors? Do the members of the team complement each other’s abilities, so that all the appropriate attributes are covered? Do your team members collaborate to make sure that employees, customers, and partners are treated fairly and with respect?

    Have a discussion with your leadership team to identify collective strengths and opportunities for improvement. Your leadership team will be strengthened as a result and your people will benefit from the outcome!


  5. Dubai Health Authority: Still flying the Seven Stars

    September 26, 2019 by BPIR.com Limited

    – A revisit of ‘Dubai We Learn’ Exemplar Benchmarking Projects –

    By Professor Dotun Adebanjo and Dr Robin Mann

    The great appeal of benchmarking is its ability to enable organisations to identify best practices from other organisations and adopt or adapt those practices to improve performance. The benchmarking process itself can be both demanding and exciting as the benchmarking team seeks to understand their organisation’s performance; identify, shortlist and visit benchmarking partners; determine the most suitable best practices; and work with internal (and sometimes external) stakeholders to implement the best practices.

    Although many aspects of the benchmarking process can be underpinned or driven by prescriptive guidelines and also managed along pre-determined timelines, the implementation of best practices is less amenable to prescriptiveness and time limitation. This is principally because the numbers, nature, scope and ease of implementation will vary significantly with the type of project and particulars of the organisation. Indeed, where many best practices are selected for implementation, it may be necessary and beneficial to implement the practices in stages or batches. It is also important to note that the benchmarking process does not end with the identification of best practices or indeed their implementation, it is also necessary to evaluate if the desired outcomes have been achieved and if not, to understand why and refine the practices as necessary.

    With this in mind, we returned to a sweltering Dubai in August 2019, 15 months after the completion of the second round of ‘Dubai We Learn’ (DWL) to visit three exemplar ‘7 Stars’ projects. ‘Dubai We Learn’ is an initiative of the Dubai Government Excellence Programme (DGEP) in collaboration with the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER) based at Massey University New Zealand. The second round of ‘Dubai We Learn’ benchmarking projects consisted of 11 projects in different Dubai Government entities and took place between March 2017 and April 2018. Details of the 11 projects and their achievements by April 2018 are available in an e-book (to be published soon). Three of the eleven benchmarking projects were 7 stars for benchmarking proficiency based on the TRADE Benchmarking Methodology that was adopted to drive the DWL projects.

    So, 15 months on, how have Dubai Government Human Resources (DGHR), Dubai Health Authority (DHA), and Dubai Police fared with their respective projects.

    Case No. 2 – Dubai Health Authority (DHA)
    The DHA project was entitled, “Prevention better than Cure / Innovative Prevention Program to Combat Diabetes”. The primary aim of the project was to ‘develop and start implementing a Dubai diabetes prevention framework based on worldwide best practices within one-year (2017) and reduce the pre-diabetic population of 356,460 adults by at least 10% by 2021.’ At the formal close of the benchmarking project in April 2018, the DHA benchmarking team had identified 114 best practice ideas from several sources including benchmarking visits to 4 organisations, desktop research and telephone-based benchmarking discussions. Of the 114, best practices, 14 were approved for deployment.

    The primary achievement of the DHA Benchmarking Team was the development of a Dubai Diabetes Prevention Framework consisting of 5 key dimensions:

    • Promoting Healthy Lifestyle
    • Early screening on DM and risk factors
    • Creative and innovative Sustainable Interventions
    • Supportive health system and partnership
    • Enforcement of non-communicable diseases policy

    By April 2018 DHA had successfully carried out diabetes screening of 22,222 Dubai residents in 12 health centres as well as the completion of the pilot phase of a Happiness Prescription Program with 43 participants. The program focussed on people at risk of diabetes using combinations of a comprehensive health survey, nutrition and health education and support, and various fitness classes. To underpin the roll out of the Happiness Prescription Program, DHA started the first phase of the ‘Hayati’ smart application with the focus of the first phase being a diabetes prevention risk assessment survey. In addition, DHA established two lifestyle clinics and developed a non-communicable disease policy for approval by Dubai’s Executive Council. DHA also carried out more awareness campaigns which engaged with 47,303 people i

    Professor Dotun Adebanjo and Dr Robin Mann catching up with Sherif Taha and Dr Salah Thabit from DHA

    What has happened since then?

    Firstly, it was pleasing to hear that the Dubai Diabetes Prevention Framework is continuing to be used to lead and manage an integrated approach to tackling diabetes in Dubai – this continues to be the prime value of the Dubai We Learn project. This unified approach, consisting of many initiatives by different stakeholders, enables DHA to have a larger impact on diabetes than it would otherwise be able to if it worked in isolation.

    The two lifestyle clinics are now firmly established and operating sustainably and with the ability to cover all regions of Dubai. By the end of 2018, the lifestyle clinics had treated 158 residents (increased from 43 treated during the pilot phase) and DHA has been working with various organisations to increase awareness of the lifestyle clinics to encourage more referrals. More than 70% of patients lost weight and reduced their risk of developing diabetes. Members of the benchmarking team continue to manage the operations of the clinics. More lifestyle clinics are planned for the future.

    Early screening activities have also become firmly established in Dubai’s health centres. To enable maximum engagement, diabetes screening has become routine as it is part of national periodic check-up and doctors in Dubai’s Primary Health Centres all have to screen patients 18 years and above. 58% of targeted clients had already been screened by the end of 2018.

    The development of the ‘Hayati’ prevention application has also moved on from the first phase. The app now has full functionality to assess and refer patients, and will soon be able to follow their daily activities and facilitate the management of activities such as sporting activities and food consumption habits. The policy on non-communicable diseases (NCD) has been approved by the Ruler of Dubai, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, and the Executive Council of Dubai. Implementation of the policy will be completed by 2021. An innovative aspect of the policy will be the use of technology by way of a ‘Telemedicine Doctor’ to improve access of Dubai residents to medical personnel. This one-to-one telemedicine facility will be launched in September 2019. The ownership of NCD has also changed and transferred to the Public Health Department.

    Hayati App for managing diabetes available from Google Play

    Major strides have been achieved with respect to awareness campaigns and engagement with the public. In partnership with Dubai Government and staff from various department and entities, Dubai Sports World was organised for the summer of 2018 and continues today. Many sports are available in one pro-standard air-conditioned area to encourage Dubai Government staff to participate in different activities to increase their fitness. DHA also participates in the Dubai Fitness challenge (DFC) launched in 2017 by the Dubai Government. DFC encourages all residents of Dubai to engage in 30 minutes of sporting activities over 30 days (30/30). This initiative increases awareness of risk factors of chronic diseases and helps people to start a healthy lifestyle.

    A wider campaign to improve the health of Dubai residents and reduce diabetes risk factors is also being led by the Public Health Department. This includes a campaign in Dubai public schools to increase time allocated for sporting activities while also launching a ‘Dubai Olympics’ challenge for the public schools. Awareness campaigns have also been carried out in Dubai Government organisations and are being rolled out to private organisations.

    Away from the implementation of the project outcomes, the DHA Benchmarking Team continues to promote the use of benchmarking as an improvement technique and have been sharing their knowledge and experiences with a benchmarking team from the Dubai Corporation for Ambulance Services (DCAS) and were planning on the same day that we visited them to share their learning with a new DHA benchmarking team set up to increase the Survival Rate of Post-Cardiac Arrest from 5% to 20% by the year 2020. For information on this new project click here.

    The DHA team are quietly confident that through the Dubai Diabetes Prevention Framework they are on track to meet their ambitious project aim of reducing the pre-diabetic population by at least 10% by 2021. The team believe that without undertaking the Dubai We Learn project it was unlikely that a Dubai Diabetes Prevention Framework would have been developed and DHA’s focus on diabetes prevention would have primarily focussed on the initiatives that it had control of rather than developing a multi-faceted and unified Dubai-wide approach. With the framework they know it will still be a challenge to meet the project’s aim as trends have been indicating higher levels of diabetes in the future and so the trend needs to plateau and reverse. However, with the framework they are steadily making progress and are on track to succeed. This indeed will be a major achievement not only in terms of the health benefits for the 300,000 plus at-risk group but also for their families and the Dubai population as a whole as it embraces a healthier lifestyle.

    Read the other case studies, Dubai Government Human Resources (DGHR) and Dubai Police.

    For more information on Dubai We Learn contact:

    Dr. Zeyad Mohammad El Kahlout, Senior Quality and Excellence Advisor, Dubai Government Excellence Program (DGEP). Email: Zeyad.ElKahlout@tec.gov.ae