1. The 11th International Benchmarking Conference

    October 1, 2017 by ahmed

    BPC02

    The 11th International Benchmarking Conference (combined with the APQO’s International Quality Conference), Okada Manila, Metro Manila, Philippines, 22-25th October, 2017.

    The event will take place in the recently opened Okada Resorts World, One main topic will be benchmarking in the context of digitalization. Other topics are Evolution of Benchmarking, Future Manufacturing in a Digital World, Benchmarking to Drive Sustainability.

    For details please see the conference homepage. We are looking forward to see you there!

     


  2. Al Jazeera International Catering wins Arabia CSR Award 2017

    September 28, 2017 by ahmed

    JIC_CSR_2017

    Al Jazeera International Catering (JIC) the award winner of the 5th Global Benchmarking Award 2016, has won the Arabia CSR Award in the “Medium Business Category” for the 10th cycle of the Arabia CSR Awards 2017The award presentation took place on September 25th 2017, at JW Marriott Hotel Dubai, UAE, which witnessed the gathering of world sustainable leaders under one roof. Al Jazeera International Catering LLC, was honored as a winner in the “Medium Business Category” for its continued commitment and passion towards embodying principles of corporate social responsibility in the business philosophy and operations of JIC.

    The award, which is the most important sustainability awards in the Region is granted to organizations after an stringent evaluation and assessment of their sustainability practices across the MENA and the Africa Region.

    Al Jazeera International Catering LLC, was honored with this award as an symbol of Recognition and Appreciation for its commitment towards various aspects of sustainability in the Areas of Social, Economic, Environmental and Civic Responsibility along with human and Labor right practices.

    The awards committee appreciated JIC’s implementation and approach towards Innovation and partnership practices been implemented towards organizational sustainability.

    On receiving this Award Mr.Robby congratulated all the staff and stakeholders of JIC for their dedication and commitment towards sustainable living and sustainability excellence, he also mentioned that the organizations CSR strategy which was made in line with the “Year of Giving” in the UAE, as declared by President His Highness Shaikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, which has helped JIC achieve this Great Award from the sustainability leaders of the Region.


  3. Announcing our partnership with the Business Transformation & Operational Excellence World Summit

    September 21, 2017 by ahmed

    BPIR COER Image for Listing

    The BPIR.com is proud to present our community with the exclusive offer of 45% off registration to the Business Transformation & Operational Excellence World Summit (BTOES18), March 12-16, 2018, Orlando, FL.Register for BTOES18 with the code BPIR by Midnight, September 29, to claim this discount.

    Register Now

    Just a few speakers already confirmed include:

      • Mishu Rahman, Senior Portfolio Director, Innovation & Digital Programs, White House Office of Management & Budget, Office of the President
      • Al Faber, CEO & President, Baldrige Foundation
      • Marina Kong, Global UX and Creative Director of Digital Customer Experience, HP
      • Dr. Morphis Tsalikidis, Regional Operational Excellence and Business Transformation Executive Director, AXA
      • Lisa Norcross, SVP and Head of the Center of Operational Excellence, E.ON
      • Akin Akintola, Head of Global Innovation Networks, Nokia
      • Loren Bishop, Director of the Lean Management Office, State Street
      • Ricardo Estok Enterprise Principle Leader, Global Manufacturing Operations & Council, Johnson Controls, Inc.
      • Hiren Kotak, Vice President, Senior Business Manager, Capital One
      • Michael Wilson, Head of Business Assurance & Improvement, BAE Systems

    Read More


  4. Baldrige Principles Bring Organizational Change, Learning to National Guard

    August 31, 2017 by ahmed

    Idaho_Army_National_Guard

    Originally posted on Blogrige by Dawn Marie Bailey

    What are the benefits and challenges of starting a Baldrige-based program from scratch in your organization?Lt. Col. Rory Thompson started such a program at the Idaho Army National Guard. In this blog, he shares his experiences on how he has been working from within to encourage a defense organization to implement Baldrige’s learning principles to achieve organizational performance excellence.

    “If defense organizations in the United States are to navigate the complexity of today’s unpredictable security environment and attain competence in organizational adaptability, innovation, integration, and process improvement, what new ways of thinking and acting are available to achieve these objectives?” asked Thompson, PMP, G3, Idaho Army National Guard Strategic Planning Manager, in his paper (submitted at Cranfield University in the United Kingdom) “How Can Defense Organizations Sustain a Competitive Advantage in the Security Marketplace? An Analysis of the Idaho Army National Guard’s Implementation of the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program.”

    He found these news ways of thinking and acting through applying principles of the Baldrige Framework and the Army Communities of Excellence (ACOE) Program, which is based on Baldrige.

    According to Thompson, he volunteered to attend training and develop the organization’s Baldrige program because in his previous positions, he kept experiencing the same general problems. “We lacked defined systematic processes to manage operational work effectively to meet our customers’ or stakeholders’ requirements, or we had a defined process but no means to evaluate it to determine ways to improve,” he said.

    “In these instances,” Thompson added, “the organization was inadvertently accepting higher amounts of unnecessary risk or contributing to rework and waste. I found myself questioning processes and wondering how or why we seemed to jump from crisis to crisis. Based on the Baldrige-based training from the Army National Guard ACOE program, I began to frame problems from a systems perspective. In other words, I relied less on individual process management and began working on organizational process management. The point is that organizational behavior and reinforcing systems play a critical part, and until we can address system issues, the processes people manage will continue to return the same result.”

    The Idaho Army National Guard began its journey to become a learning organization in 2014 with its first application to the Army ACOE program. It used the Baldrige Framework as an organizational management and maturity model to achieve the following:

    • Provide high-quality services to customers, partners, and stakeholders
    • Guide and facilitate organizational learning as a method to increase efficiency and organizational effectiveness
    • Empower the workforce to contribute to quality
    • Manage complexity and risk

    In his paper, Rory writes that the Idaho Army National Guard’s initial priority was “to influence organizational culture and human behavior through an organizational design modification that adjusted the common military functional management model to a matrix management model. The objective for the design modification was to break down barriers of communication and enable departmental cross-talk and sharing of information.”

    The next priority was to set the conditions for a learning organization. According to his paper, “The primary objective of the organizational learning model was to provide a reference point for the workforce to view learning from feedback as it occurs at tactical, operational and strategic levels of work. The secondary objective was to reinforce how the Idaho Army National Guard supports a climate for learning and information sharing. The tertiary objective was to ensure that paths of learning were available at the operational, tactical, and strategic levels of operation.”

    “As we became more familiar with the concepts of the Baldrige Framework and overcame some initial hurdles, we have had great successes, and we will continue, as is the beauty of the Baldrige Criteria [with the Baldrige Framework],” said Thompson.

    One of his favorite recent examples of successes in using Baldrige and other continuous improvement training programs are employees calling him or contacting him directly wanting to get involved, get trained, and start effecting positive change, he said. In addition, new methods to communicate externally and internally to the workforce, customers, partners, and stakeholders have emerged; these include an external website, internal podcasts, external and internal social media platforms, a new brand and logo, and new organizational strategy layered with Baldrige concepts. There’s even been more “workforce engagement and willingness to explore better ways of doing things,” Thompson added.

    “The overall experience is and has been critical to my organizational management/leadership skills,” said Thompson. “This [Baldrige] framework has opened doors I had no idea existed. The moment I became involved in Baldrige, my eyes and mind opened to at first what was confusing and different, but as I learned the framework, I began to view organizational management from a much different perspective. As I learned more about the Baldrige framework, I began to see gaps in my own ability to manage organizations.”

    Inspired by his learning, Thompson became an examiner with Performance Excellence Northwest, a Baldrige-based program and member of the Alliance for Performance Excellence that covers the states of Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. He also earned a Project Management Professional (PMP) certification and went to PROSCI Change Management training, Lean Six Sigma Green Belt training, and Lean Six Sigma Black Belt training.

    Thompson offers advice for others who may be trying to start an internal Baldrige program, but he warns that there is no cookie-cutter, one-size-fits-all approach because there are simply too many external and internal organizational variables.

    “There is no set timetable, and the organization will cue you in when it is ready to press harder. You should manage expectations early; however, you are not out to win an award. The award is a byproduct of a relatively mature system,” he said.

    Some general advice follows:

    • Start the program small, and be careful not to “upset” the traditional ways of doing things.
    • Try to select those for your implementation team who have some leverage and longevity in the organization, and who show a natural inclination towards continuous improvement and quality.
    • Get small wins with your team to help build momentum.
    • Find a balance between controlling implementation and stifling innovation.
    • Eventually work Baldrige concepts into the strategy without upending the overall structure.
    • Speak the language your organization understands. Do integrate Baldrige concepts but avoid using specific Baldrige terminology.

  5. New study shows we work harder when we are happy

    August 25, 2017 by ahmed

    HappyPhoto by slalit / CC BY-ND 2.0

    Originally posted on University of Warwick

    Happiness makes people more productive at work, according to the latest research from the University of Warwick.

    Economists carried out a number of experiments to test the idea that happy employees work harder. In the laboratory, they found happiness made people around 12% more productive.

    Professor Andrew Oswald, Dr Eugenio Proto and Dr Daniel Sgroi from the Department of Economics at the University of Warwick led the research.

    This is the first causal evidence using randomized trials and piece-rate working. The study, to be published in the Journal of Labor Economics, included four different experiments with more than 700 participants.

    During the experiments a number of the participants were either shown a comedy movie clip or treated to free chocolate, drinks and fruit. Others were questioned about recent family tragedies, such as bereavements, to assess whether lower levels of happiness were later associated with lower levels of productivity.

    Professor Oswald said: “Companies like Google have invested more in employee support and employee satisfaction has risen as a result. For Google, it rose by 37%, they know what they are talking about. Under scientifically controlled conditions, making workers happier really pays off.”

    Dr Sgroi added: “The driving force seems to be that happier workers use the time they have more effectively, increasing the pace at which they can work without sacrificing quality.”

    Dr Proto said the research had implications for employers and promotion policies.

    He said: “We have shown that happier subjects are more productive, the same pattern appears in four different experiments. This research will provide some guidance for management in all kinds of organizations, they should strive to make their workplaces emotionally healthy for their workforce.”