1. Being remarkable from the boardroom to the bedside

    March 31, 2017 by ahmed

    HILL-COUNTRY

    Originally posted on Blogrige by Dawn Marie Bailey

    “Remarkable” means extraordinary, uncommon, worthy of notice or attention, unusual.

    Would you use that word to describe your place of work? How about your hospital? Now imagine how much more confidence you would have in your health care provider if it had proven itself to be extraordinary or remarkable.

    Baldrige Award recipient Hill Country Memorial continues to work toward being remarkable every day, with continuous improvements in the care it provides and in all areas of its operations.

    At the upcoming 29th Annual Quest for Excellence® Conference, Dr. James R. Partin, chief medical officer at Hill Country Memorial, will be presenting on the hospital’s “journey from good to remarkable” and on how other organizations might learn to make their operations remarkable, too.

    In a virtual interview, Partin shared with me Hill Country Memorial’s journey.

    What makes Hill Country’s journey remarkable?

    I think what makes Hill Country’s journey remarkable is the focus on improvement at all levels of the organization; from the boardroom to the bedside, each individual is committed to providing the highest quality of care and service to our patients and community. Another key has been our ability to integrate Baldrige into our day-to-day operations. We don’t “do Baldrige,” but rather we look at our processes and determine how we can revise/improve them to meet the Baldrige Criteria [found within the Baldrige Excellence Framework] and improve performance.

    Can you share an example of your success along the journey?

    One of our biggest successes along the journey was in the deployment of our strategic plan. We integrated this deployment into our cascade of strategic goals through department goals to support the strategic targets and individual employee quarterly coaching plans; these plans address how each employee implements action plans to help his/her department achieve departmental goals that roll back up to achievement of strategic goals.

    Another success is our implementation of the Strategic Breakthrough Improvement (SBI) Process. This process includes 90-day, interdisciplinary, organizational-level improvement teams that work on strategic action plans. Through the SBI and cascading goal processes, we have improved achievement of strategic targets from approximately 50% annually to 85% annually.

    What are your top tips for using Baldrige resources to support such a journey?

    • Don’t make Baldrige another thing you are doing. Rather, look at your processes and determine how you can improve them to address the Baldrige Criteria.
    • Share results with all stakeholders. Let people know how the work they are doing is helping the organization achieve its goals.
    • Involve physicians in improving key processes within the organization.

    What else might participants learn at your conference session?

    The most striking example of how Hill Country Memorial has continued to use the Baldrige Excellence Framework is in the Strategic Development Deployment Process. We continue to use the process and timeline to define our strategy annually for managing our strengths and improving our weaknesses to meet the changing health care environment, increasing competition, and the ever-changing payment models.

    What are a few key reasons that organizations in your sector can benefit from using the Baldrige Excellence Framework?

    The Baldrige framework

    • provides an organizational approach to improvement that is balanced;
    • helps an organization focus on key results and the processes that support those results, really honing in on important improvement opportunities; and
    • uncovers gaps/opportunities that staff may not know existed in the organization.

  2. 5th International Best Practice Competition – 3rd & Final Call for Entries

    March 22, 2017 by ahmed

    The Best Practice Competition, will be held in Mumbai, India, 25/26th April 2017 courtesy of BestPrax Club. The competition serves as a unique opportunity to share and learn best practices from around the globe.

    Have a think about what systems, processes and practices your organisation does well and submit an entry by the 27th of March 2017 at the latest. This is the 3rd and Final Call with many best practices already selected.

    If successful you will be asked to share your best practice in an 8 minute presentation on the 25/26th April 2017, Mumbai, India.

    The winners of the International Best Practice Competition in 2015 were Al Jazeera International Catering LLC, UAE with a best practice titled ‘Our Planet – Our Responsibility‘. and Dubai Corporation for Ambulance Services (DCAS), UAE, with a best practice titled ‘Cultural Sensitivity Gives Birth to a Maternity Care‘.


  3. An exploration of innovation: An organization’s only insurance against irrelevance

    March 17, 2017 by ahmed

     

    Originally posted on Blogrige by Dawn Marie Bailey

    Prepare for an inspiring journey is the message for audience members of the upcoming 29th Annual Quest for Excellence Conference, as they listen to keynote presenter Polly LaBarre, co-founder and director of Management Lab (MLab) and co-founder of MIX (Management Innovation eXchange).Addressing some probing questions-such as “How do you create a DNA-deep, sustaining capacity for innovation?” “What does it mean to be a leader in a creative, connected, disruptive world?” and “How do you create organizations that unleash rather than squash human potential?”-LaBarre will reveal practical, high-impact ways to innovate, adapt, and succeed, redefining how leadership, change, innovation, collaboration, employee engagement, organizational culture, accountability, and disruptive strategy are done.

    Through a virtual interview, I asked some of my own questions of LaBarre, who is also co-author of Mavericks at Work and founding member of Fast Company.

    Your website says you have a passion for “framing the big questions that will rule the future of business.” Can you provide some of those questions?

    The first big question is How do you create a DNA-deep, sustaining capacity for innovation?

    You’d be hard pressed to meet a CEO or a leader today who doesn’t put innovation at the top of the agenda. And yet, how many organizations have devoted the energy and resources it takes to systematically build innovation into the values, processes, and practices that rule everyday activity and behavior? Not many. According to a recent McKinsey & Co. study, just 6 percent of leaders are satisfied with their company’s innovation performance. What gives?

    That disconnect isn’t due to lack of human ingenuity or resources. It’s a product of organizational DNA. Productivity, predictability, and alignment are embedded in the marrow of our management systems. Experimentation, risk-taking, and variety are the enemy of the efficiency machine that is the “modern” corporation. Of course, it’s variety (and the daring to be different) that produces game-changing innovation. If you want to develop a sustaining capacity for innovation, think about how do we make our management systems and practices enablers and catalysts of innovation (rather than impediments to it)? Put another way, how do we plan and prioritize, define roles and structures, allocate resources, measure and evaluate, equip and reward people, and develop new products to support innovation?

    For instance, you might ask yourself:

    • How might we create more slack and support for the pursuit of new things?
    • Could we re-think how we design work to cultivate more entrepreneurial energy?
    • What could we change in the way we evaluate leaders to cultivate more experimentation?
    • Could we open up our product development process to involve more stakeholders?
    • What market-based approach could we imagine to evaluate and fund new ideas?

    The answer to every one of those questions is what I call a “management hack”—an alternative to conventional management practice designed to uproot bureaucracy and cultivate innovation and adaptability.

    A second big question for the future: What does it mean to be a leader in a creative, connected, disruptive world?

    We live in a world where leadership, power, and influence are less about “where you sit” and more about “what you can do.” The most compelling leaders understand that authority is not bestowed by a title but is rather a currency you earn (and must keep earning) from your peers. The most effective individuals are constantly striving to maximize their ratio of accomplishment over authority.

    In that context, what is the work of leadership today? How do you conduct yourself as a leader day in and day out to keep yourself and your team moving with the times? A short course in 21st century leadership would probe the following:

    • Are you learning as fast as the world is changing? The imperative today is to remain open and hungry when it comes to discovering and experimenting with new ideas and new methods—to cultivate a first-person experience with the future.
    • Do you ask more questions than you give answers? This is a good one for anyone in a position of authority—parents and leaders alike. Questions offer up a powerful advantage in a world of expanding complexity and intense change—they help you attract more possibilities, surface more perspectives, and enlist more support to your cause. It’s not easy to get in the habit of asking questions in a world that values knowledge and mastery. If you’re having trouble, take your lead from a toddler and start asking: Why? Why not? What if?
    • Are you unreasonable enough? Turns out that all change is against the rules. Creativity is fundamentally subversive in nature. It’s the leader’s job to develop a contrarian point of view, invite dissent, and take an activist role in questioning and devising alternatives to the status quo. The most productive rebels aren’t out to make trouble—but to make genuine progress in the world.

    A third big question: How do you create organizations that unleash rather than squash human potential?

    One of the most important question for any leader today is How do we create a work environment that inspires exceptional contribution and merits an outpouring of passion, imagination, and initiative? It doesn’t matter if you are part of a giant, global company or a local chapter of a nonprofit, the most important leverage you can get when it comes to building a vibrant and sustainable organization is the human edge. What are you doing to unleash each person’s human gifts—creativity, zeal, resourcefulness?

    The most effective and inspiring leaders today understand that there is no tradeoff between creativity and discipline, between inventing the future and “turning the crank.” Instead, they are relentlessly clever when it comes to creating mechanisms for individuals to express themselves, to contribute, and to hold each other accountable at the same time.

    A final big question to consider: Are you different enough to make a difference?

    More than ever, the value you create is a function of the values you assert as an organization. Organizations animated by a deeply felt and widely shared sense of purpose are breeding grounds for passion—the ultimate multiplier of human effort.

    At a time when customers are contending with a seemingly limitless universe of urgent and compelling alternatives and demands on their time, how do you stand out? This isn’t an exercise in branding so much as a process of excavating, sharpening, and sharing a powerful sense of purpose. What do you stand for? What are you against? How do you draw that line in the sand? How do you keep sharpening the set of ideas in every interaction with your people and your customers?

    Two helpful questions to keep asking yourselves as leaders and as a larger team: What ideas are you fighting for? And, are you really who you say you are?

    Why is the focus on innovation so important to a business? Is that importance still true for a nonprofit, a health care organization, a school?

    Innovation is the only insurance against irrelevance in a world of unrelenting change. It’s the only antidote to the margin-crushing impact of global competition. It’s the only defense against younger, hungrier industry insurgents. It’s the only guarantee of continued customer loyalty.

    And it’s just as crucial for nonprofits, health care organizations, and even schools. Why? Every organization and every leader today is contending with a rapidly changing reality—wave after wave of disruptive technology, increasing interdependence of our institutions, social and environmental challenges, and the escalating demands of a variety of stakeholders. Organizations operate within the toughest constraints, and most need to tap into the full potential of their people to build a sustaining capacity to innovate and adapt. One of the most cost-effective, risk-bound, and fast ways to start to build your innovation muscles is to experiment with experimentation. How many options can you generate, quickly test, and iterate on? How many people can you involve across the organization in creating its future?


  4. Which is most popular – Baldrige, EFQM or Deming?

    March 8, 2017 by ahmed

    baldrige-efqm-deming-award

    I am often asked which business excellence framework is more popular – the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence or the EFQM Excellence Model. I answer this question by saying that more countries use the EFQM Excellence Model primarily because there are so many countries in Europe. COER’s research in 2015 showed that 61 countries have a national business excellence award with the EFQM model being used most often. However, the countries that use the Baldrige framework tend to be larger such as the United States and China so perhaps the number of users of this framework are greater?To explore this question and for a bit of fun I used Google Trends. There were various searches I could do as the names of these awards/frameworks can vary and would have an impact on the search results. The ones I chose to search on first of all were the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, EFQM Excellence Model (I thought this term was best to search for as most countries promote the model and their national award rather than the EFQM Excellence Award) and the Deming Prize (it was interesting to add this to the mix as the Deming Prize was established in 1951 as the first major prize for TQM orientated organisations).

    This graph reveals that the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award was easily the most searched for item with two to three times as many searches in comparison to the EFQM Excellence Model. The Deming Prize was rarely searched for.

    baldrige-efqm-deming-award-1

    The next graph shows a second search. This time I searched for Baldrige, EFQM and Deming. The results are very interesting. As can be seen Deming was easily the most popular search with three to four times as many searches as for Baldrige, which came second, or the EFQM. This search shows the continued relevance and impact of Deming’s work worldwide and that the Baldrige and EFQM “brands” have not reached the same level of popularity (even though these frameworks have largely embraced Deming’s 14 points in their core values and concepts).

    baldrige-efqm-deming-award-2

    The findings from this research points to the opportunity to grow the brand of “business excellence” in general. This finding is supported from other comparisons of “business excellence” with other tools and techniques as per the previous Google Trends article.

    This article was written by Dr Robin Mann, Head of the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research, NZ.


  5. Which is most popular – Benchmarking, Best Practices, Business Excellence, Innovation, Lean, Six Sigma, Balanced Scorecard, Knowledge Management, ISO 9001 or IS0 14001?

    March 7, 2017 by ahmed
    My friend from the Australian Organisation for Quality – Michael W McLean, Managing Director, McLean Management Consultants Pty Limited brought to my attention the usefulness and fun of using Google Trends. Michael had compared the popularity of business excellence with a number of other improvement methodologies and techniques. His point was the relative lack of awareness or popularity of business excellence in comparison to other improvement approaches, in particular in comparison to ISO 9001. This was disappointing but no great surprise as it supported the findings of a study that COER undertook for SAI Global on the Australian Business Excellence Framework (ABEF) in 2007 (study shown here) – this revealed that only 9.5% of senior managers/directors in Australia had heard of the ABEF and only 1.3% had used the ABEF to improve their performance over the last 5 years.
    The graphs below are from my own comparisons using Google Trends. The first graph shows the popularity according to the number of searches for Benchmarking, Best Practices, Business Excellence and Innovation. These topics are the areas of expertise for my organisation, the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER). The graph shows the popularity of these approaches over 5 years from a worldwide perspective and only including results of searches of a “business and industrial” nature rather than on “games” or “sport” for example.most_popular1The graph shows clearly that innovation is the most popular search item, approximately four times as popular as searches for best practices and benchmarking. Business excellence is a 1/100th as popular as innovation. (Note the numbers on the left hand axis represent search interest relative to the highest point on the chart for the given region and time. A value of 100 is the peak popularity for the term. A value of 50 means that the term is half as popular. Likewise a score of 0 means the term was less than 1% as popular as the peak).

    The second graph shows the popularity according to the number of searches for Benchmarking, Lean manufacturing, ISO 9001, Innovation and ISO 14001. This graph reveals that Innovation is the most popular topic with ISO 9001 second (at 50% popularity), Benchmarking third, ISO 14001 fourth, and Lean manufacturing last.

    most_popular2

    The third and final graph shows the popularity according to the number of searches for Benchmarking, Six Sigma, Balanced Scorecard, Innovation and Knowledge Management. This graph reveals that Innovation is again the most popular topic with Six Sigma second (at 50% popularity), Benchmarking third, Knowledge Management fourth and Balanced Scorecard last.

    most_popular3

    These searches reflect the interests of business people around the world and therefore should be taken seriously. Innovation can be seen as the hot topic over the last 5 years and yet systems/approaches/methodologies to help organisations become more innovative are still in their infancy. Those of us that understand business excellence will recognise that business excellence models have innovation integrated into the model criteria and yet the models are relatively unknown and unused. This presents an opportunity for the administrators and promoters of business excellence to leverage off the interest in innovation to offer their holistic business excellence model as a guide to building innovative organisations.

    This article was written by Dr Robin Mann, Head of the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research, NZ.