Book Reviews…

January 22, 2011 by

Over the past year I have read and reviewed a number of books – it is part and parcel of our job at BPIR.com to keep up-to-date with the latest information. Here are some of the most interesting books I have read. Why not get off to a good-start in 2011 by reading one of these books and applying their insights and ideas.
 
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Authentic Personal Branding – A New Blueprint for Building and Aligning a Powerful Leadership Brand, Dr. Hubert Rampersad, 2009. www.total-performance-scorecard.com. Hubert has a talent to apply business concepts to personal improvement. In this book, he shows us all how to build our own personal brand—and just as importantly—how to persuasively communicate this brand to the world.

FAST Action Solution Teams – How to save a million dollars in 2 days, Jim Harrington, 2010. www.qualitydigest.com/inside/quality-insider-news/book-fast-action-solution-technique-fast.html. Jim Harrington is still going strong at 82 years old, his mind and thinking is as sharp as ever and this is his reflected in his latest book. FAST Action Solution Teams is a straightforward book on how your organisation can pick off the low hanging fruit and put in solutions that will quickly reap major bottom-line returns. FAST Action Solution Teams refers to one or two-day study projects that define improvements that individuals performing the study can implement within the next 90 days.

Hoshin Kanri – The Strategic Approach to Continuous Improvement, David Hutchins, 2008. www.hutchins.co.uk/bk_hoshin.aspx. David has been a leader for many, many years in bringing tried and trusted techniques from the Far East to the awareness of the West. David’s latest book focuses on Hoshin Kanri—a strategic approach that encompasses four key elements of business management, namely Vision, Policy Development, Policy Deployment and Policy Control. This approach, developed in Japan, and used by organisations such as Toyota, was initially popularised by Professor Kaoru Ishikawa. It is a powerful approach, as it particularly assists in strategy deployment, which is often a weakness in organisations.

Key Performance Indicators – Developing, Implementing, and Using Winning KPIs, David Parmenter, 2009www.davidparmenter.com. I have known David for many years, and could not wait to read the second edition of his book. The book simplifies performance measurement and is highly practical. Its focus is on the correct selection and deployment of performance measures to ensure that all resources and effort are focused on achieving business strategy. In particular, it explains the right way to measure and not the wrong way. Too often, companies claim they have key performance indicators, and yet these are often lagging measures and measured infrequently… therefore, how can they be key?   This second edition includes a discussion of critical success factors, as well as new chapters that focus on implementations issues and 'how to sections' on finding your CSFs and brainstorming the performance measures that report progress within the CSFs, Key Performance Indicators. The second edition will help you to identify and track your organization's KPIs to ensure continued and increased success.  

No More Consultants – We Know More Than We Think. Geoff Parcell & Chris Collinson, 2009. www.chriscollison.com. This book describes interesting and practical ways to do internal benchmarking through self-assessments and the use of a “River Diagram”. A River Diagram visually shows where there is the greatest opportunity for sharing practices and learning within an organisation. By using River Diagrams, the level of internal sharing can be mapped and increased, thus assisting an organisation to leverage off its internal experience, expertise and practices.  

The Rudolph Factor: Finding the Bright Lights that Drive Innovation in Your Business, Cyndi Laurin and Craig Morningstar, 2009. www.guidetogreatness.com. The Rudolph Factor details the impressive turnaround of The Boeing Company, with real stories from the people at Boeing C-17 who contributed to its success. Rudolphs, explain the authors, are the 10 percent of any organisation's people who are the true agents of innovation – people who can shine the light exactly where a company needs to go. Since they tend to identify causes of problems (rather than symptoms), they generate sustainable solutions more quickly and efficiently than others. Because their thinking tends to be counter-intuitive, Rudolphs are typically considered outcasts or loose cannons until their talents are needed (often at the 11th hour of a crisis, at which point they often are hailed as heroes).

In finding these crucial individuals, nurturing them, and putting their ideas to work, your company can achieve consistently higher levels of innovation – and thrive in every economy. The Rudolph Factor shows managers how to spark bright ideas and capture greatness in others. Another great book from Cyndi!

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I hope these reviews were useful! Please, let me know of any books that you recommend.
 
Dr Robin Mann
Co-founder BPIR.com

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