1. COER’s Productivity and Business Excellence Research

    June 15, 2014 by ahmed

    The importance of raising productivity, achieving greater outputs as a proportion of inputs, for wealth creation is well understood. The challenge is how to achieve this whether it is on a personal, organizational, or country level.  The Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER), founders of the BPIR.com, are grappling with this challenge and providing solutions through its research programmes and activities.

    Dr Robin Mann, Head of COER, is the Chief Expert for a major project with the Asian Productivity Organisation (APO) to review productivity initiatives in 20 Asian economies so that more effective Asian-wide and National strategies and services for productivity improvement can be provided. The coordination meeting for this project was held in Tokyo, 27/28 May, where time was spent developing the research tools. The next step is for National Experts representing each country to collect data from their various stakeholders; funders, partners, staff and clients. Early results from the research are expected at the end of August, with the final report published in March 2015.  From an academic perspective this project is important as access is being given to data that is not normally available for research purposes and as such a number of journal papers have been targeted for publication.

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    Dr Mann (centre) with the Secretary General of the APO and the National Experts from member countries

    This year, Dr Mann is involved in a number of APO projects including:

    • Advising the Philippines on their National Business Excellence Strategy for the public sector (therefore recommending services to help the public sector to become more accountable and efficient) and providing benchmarking training to its key institutions.
    • A conference on business excellence in Pakistan (2-5 September)
    • A business excellence week for the public sector for all APO members in Singapore (27-31 October) to coincide with SPRING Singapore’s Global Business Excellence Conference.

    COER are also the organisers of the International Best Practice Competition, www.bestpracticecompetition.com, and Global Benchmarking Award, www.globalbenchmarkingaward.com, which are both supported by many APO members. The 3rd International Best Practice Competition will be held in conjunction with the Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce on the 25 November. The event is like a talent contestant but in this case organisations need to share a specific best practice within an 8 minute presentation. In 2013, 36 entries were received from 10 countries, and the winner was the Immigration & Checkpoints Authority from Singapore.  The Global Benchmarking Award follows a similar process but recognizes those organisations that have developed an effective approach for benchmarking. The 3rd Global Benchmarking Award will be held in Florida, Orlanda, 3 to 4th December. The winner in 2013 was the Knowledge and Human Development Authority (KHDA) in Dubai which is using benchmarking as a key method to improve the educational performance of private schools.

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    Photo 3 – Immigration & Checkpoints Authority receiving their award from Dr Robin Mann and Marc Amblard, CEO, EFQM
    Photo 4 – KHDA receiving the Global Benchmarking Award from the Global Benchmarking Network.

    COER’s international work also involves assisting with organizing a number of conferences including a Benchmarking Conference in Iran (11-12 October),  Business Excellence Conferences in Abu Dhabi (17-18 September) and Dubai (26/27 November), Benchmarking Conference in Abu Dhabi (21-25 September), and providing benchmarking training workshops in Bahrain, India, Malaysia,  New Zealand, Singapore and UAE.

    To disseminate the learning from COER’s activities it has developed the Business Performance Improvement Resource, www.BPIR.com. Recently over 100 videos of best practices were added. Some APO members provide access to the BPIR.com to organisations in their country to encourage productivity improvements. For example, SPRING Singapore provides access to the BPIR to over 500 of its business excellence certified companies.

    COER’s PhD students are contributing to the knowledge on productivity and business excellence. Alan Samuel is researching “Informal Benchmarking” – the way organisations learn from each other using an unstructured approach rather than through “Formal Benchmarking”. Informal Benchmarking is the most popular type of benchmarking and includes conversing with fellow workers to learn from their experience, networking with associates from other organizations, or simply researching a website to learn from better practices. Whilst this method is popular there has been little research on it as most research has focused on the more rigorous formal benchmarking. To participate in Alan’s research click here.

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    Alan Samuel presenting at the Global Business Excellence Conference in Singapore, 2013

    Another student Rubab Malik is studying high performing or fast improving schools and school systems around the world to identify how they learn and apply best practice. This research is of particular importance to New Zealand with its decline in educational performance of 15 year olds from 7th to 13th in reading, 7th to 18th in science and from 13th to 23rd in maths (according to the respected PISA assessment).

    For more information on COER, contact Dr Robin Mann, r.s.mann@massey.ac.nz or sign up to COER’s newsletter at http://www.coer.org.nz/share/free-newsletter.


  2. The Sponsor as the face of organisational change

    November 25, 2013 by nick.halley

    A large proportion of projects are not given enough executive level attention. Due to this, a large number of projects ultimately fail, as they move further and further away from the business’ core competencies, and strategic alignment between business and project breaks down. In order to overcome this, effective organizations recognize project sponsorship as a key part in any project. It is very important to have active sponsors who support change. Sponsors establish direction for the future, communicate through vision, and forge aligned, high performance teams.

    Dr. H. James Harrington, CEO and Douglas Nelson of Harrington Associates, have written a white paper explaining further how an effective sponsor, who sits at an executive level, can help eliminate the barriers to change and ensure the rapid and effective implementation of project outcomes. Commissioned by the Project Management Institute (PMI), the white paper, outlines characteristics and skills of a strong sponsor, including; power, sense of urgency, vision, public role, private role, and leverage. It includes a small but effective tool for assessing the suitability of a person for a sponsor role.

    The following statement from Managing Change in Organizations: A Practice Guide (PMI, 2013b) provides the foundational concept for this whitepaper.

    “A sponsor provides resources required for change and has the ultimate responsibility for the program or project, building commitment for the change particularly at the senior management level across the organization. Direct responsibility and accountability for the change needs to be clearly defined and accepted at an appropriately high level within an organization. Consequently, the sponsor for a change effort should be someone who has sufficient authority, influence, power, enthusiasm, and time to ensure that any conflicts that could impede the change are resolved in a timely and appropriate fashion.”

    Read the white paper HERE hosted by PMI.


  3. How to get $820 for each $1 spent using a Business Excellence Programme

    February 8, 2012 by admin
    One of the repeated questions in quality management is, what is the cost of quality? is quality free?
    Well, my personal opinion is, it is and it is not. According to quality guru Philip Crosby “Quality is free. But it is not a gift”

    In other words, the organisation needs to “pay” for establishing a quality system in order to get the rewards, it’s like paying for someone to fix the leaks in a system.

    Therefore, with any  improvement initiative there will be some cost associated with the programme but at the end the organisation should gain much more than what they have paid.

    In Dec 2011, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) published the results of a research study aimed to evaluate the net social benefits of the Baldrige Performance Excellence Programme.

    The researchers compared the benefits received by the 273 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award applicants from 2007 to 2010 with the cost of operating the Baldrige Program.

    According to the research, the benefit-to-cost ratio of Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award is 820-to-1, which means for every $1 spent to implement the programme the economy will get $820 in form of social value, which is categorized into 3 categories:

    • The applicants’ cost savings from using the freely available Baldrige Criteria instead of a higher-priced alternative
    • Gains to U.S. consumers, who had greater satisfaction with higher-quality products
    • Gains to U.S. economy resources saved by using the Baldrige Criteria
    The researchers noted  that the benefit-to-cost ratio would be much higher  for the US economy but the research only focussed on the benefits stemming from the award applicants (in respect to the social costs of running the whole Baldrige programme). In reality, 1000’s more organisations will have benefited from the programme.

    You can read the full research from here.

    Ahmed
    BPIR.com

     


  4. The COER Perspective

    October 21, 2010 by
    COER_Logo

    This October, the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER) has issued its periodical newsletter to inform readers of its research findings and initiatives in organisational excellence, benchmarking, and performance improvement.

    The first section includes research being undertaken to develop a “guide model” to help professionals select the right performance improvement programme, through the use of a simple step-by-step procedure.

    Whether you are looking to know the latest research in the field or you would like to know what are the latest must attend event or even book suggestions and reviews plus much more you will find it in COER newsletter

    The contents for the newsletter are listed below:

    1. A GUIDE Model for Selecting Improvement Initiatives to Achieve Organisational Excellence.
    2. The Role of Organisational and National Culture in Business Improvement Initiatives.
    3. What Are the Triggers for Business Excellence?
    4. PhD Opportunities in Best Practice and Business Excellence Research.
    5. Eighty-Six Countries with National Quality/Business Excellence Awards.
    6. The Impact of Business Excellence/Quality Awards: An International Study.
    7. Business Excellence Tools for Self-Assessment.
    8. Professionalising the Application of Benchmarking.
    9. What Will Benchmarking Be Like in 2030? The GBN Wants to Know Your Views.
    10. Finding Best Practices Faster…
    11. Read the Latest News.
    12. Customer Complaints Resolution, Succession Planning and Business Outsourcing.
    13. Benchmarking Support in the Middle East.
    14. BPIR.com Limited’s Growth Plans – Partner Search.
    15. “Must Attend” Events.
    16. Forthcoming Events.
    17. Past Conferences/Events
    18. Book Reviews
    19. Subscribe to COER News.

    You can download the newsletter from here 


  5. What will be the future of benchmarking? – share your view.

    September 22, 2010 by
    The Global Benchmarking Network is embarking on a project to look at the future of Benchmarking up to the year 2030.
     
    This project will answer the following questions – What will Benchmarking look like in 2030 – and in between? What are the tools, methodologies and technologies that Benchmarkers can use now to help organisations and economies to improve their outcomes?

    Please accept this invitation to participate in the survey, the survey will take less than 10 minutes to complete.

    Once you complete the survey, you will immediately gain access to the Global Benchmarking Network “Benchmarking 2030 Interim Report” showing our initial research findings. Further findings will be presented at the 5th International Benchmarking Conference, 5-6 December 2010, Kuwait, kuwaitbenchmarking.com . The final report will be published in 2011.

    Click here to participate in the survey and get the free report.