1. Questions on Quality Management

    March 12, 2009 by admin

    Hello all,,,

    My name is Ahmed, the newest member in BPIR.com team and this is my first blog, I would like to share with you some questions I’m thinking about.

    What is the future of quality? What is the next big thing? What does the future hold for the profession after the recent global financial crisis?

    Ideally, quality professionals are the people that organisations rely on to search for improvements and eliminate wastes, is this what is happening currently?
    Have you noticed that quality departments have become smaller!!! while its roles and knowledge are spread throughout all the functions and departments in most organisations, in my opinion this means quality is everyone-job now, all employees should know and put in practice some quality tools and techniques not just the responsibility of business excellence or quality control department.
    That’s good thing for organisations (I mean the knowledge part not the smaller quality departments part) and overtime will result in developing quality culture but this will result in demand for more specific solutions and more tailor made programmes which is a new challenge for quality service providers for businesses (B2B) such as accreditation bodies and research agencies, how to address the very specific needs of other quality professionals in different sectors such as healthcare, education and food such challenge faced ISO9001 earlier and resulted in developing sector specific versions (ISO / TS 29001 for petrochemicals, TL9000 for Telco and ISO13485:2003 for design and manufacture of medical devices, etc..).

    Fortunately, we have very good tool that can bridge the gap between two processes in two different entities in two different sectors, which is Benchmarking.

    But Benchmarking as a process may takes significant time and resources so we need to do something to help us to accelerate the process and make life easier. Well, here comes another question, what will happen if we mixed a performance resource with web 2.0 technologies into one website?

    So, what does the future hold for us?

    This is what you will experience in the next few weeks.

    Best regards,

    Ahmed

    My BlogCatalog BlogRank


  2. People, Priorities, and Wee-Early-Hours Finishes

    November 11, 2008 by admin

    Sat here in my usual apparent stupor, mouth open, eyes fixed – in between bursts of soft tap tap tapping on the keyboard – I am fiercely concentrating on the inside.  Its 2.17am according to my laptop. As usual I am working towards one of many regular weekly deadlines, any of which, if I miss, will affect people; individuals.  These take priority in my life over less personal deadlines that may in fact affect the company bottom line more significantly.  Why do I prioritise so?  And why do I place my own work-life balance, and even health, at so much risk on their behalf?   Thinking about this takes me back to an incident on eBay a couple of years ago when I invoked a ‘gentlemen’s rule’.  An item I had received was not as per the description advertised.  It was a mistake; nothing devious.  The seller, Jared, agreed to take back the item and pay for the postage too – both ways.  He ended up paying more in postage than the worth of the item he had intended to sell.   He said, in an email, “people before money, mate” when I thanked him for being so gracious.  

    Jared’s comment has stayed with me ever since.   He was right of course and is one of the ‘good guys’, but the point I want to make is that, increasingly, business is becoming more about individuals and relationships than about supply and demand.  The arrival of Web 2.0 and networking concepts referred to in previous posts here, and our deliberate move to orientate the BPIR resource towards a more personal relationship-based approach, is part of the natural evolution in our society.  Looking back, this change started to build up steam a couple of decades ago when terms such as ‘internal customer’,‘supplier-relationship’, and ‘customer-supplier partnership’ became new buzz-words in contemporary management jargon.  Mergers and Acquisitions gave way to Strategic Partnerships and Alliances, Collaborative Projects, and Joint Ventures.  The reality of these brave new concepts is of course that they were built around trust and strong relationships between the leaders of the participant organizations.  The coincidence of relationship-based enabling technologies and the ‘survival’ need for businesses to become more sharing, open to alliances and partnerships, and to identify and nurture Human Capital has forced an almost quantum leap in a few short years.  I have always believed that every business is a ‘people business’, but recognition of this is only now growing strongly.

    Well, I’d better crack on.  I just thought I’d share those thoughts with you since they derailed me from my work. It’s now almost 3am and I’d like to accomplish a few more tasks before bed. 

    Nitey-nite

    Steve

    General dog’s body, grafter, and MD of BPIR.com Limited  ” A boss with no humor is like a job that is no fun”


  3. Benchmarking and Social Networking

    by admin

    Hello all

    I thought I would share with you our next phase of development for the BPIR.com and hopefully get some feedback from you.

    Currently the BPIR.com is an information resource. It contains one of the largest collections of best practices, benchmarks, self-assessment tools etc on the web.. However, with recent developments in web technology and the growing interest in social networking we are now planning to introduce the 2nd phase of development. This will transform the BPIR into an information and networking resource.

    I recently attended the 3rd International Benchmarking Conference in Hungary, www.bestpracticeconference.com. Much of the talk here was to do with how technology can support benchmarking. One of the most interesting presentations was by Aad Streng, Corporate Quality, Philips.   Philips found that few people will implement a good idea without first consulting the owner of the idea/best practice. Hence, Aad emphasised that it is at least as important to connect people to people than to connect people to information. Aad then talked about how Philips through its profiling/social networking tools was encouraging its employees to network and learn from each other – with over 130,000 employees worldwide it was essential that knowledge was transferred effectively company-wide and social networking technology had a key role in this.

    Moving back to the BPIR… By May 2009 all our members will be able to develop their own personal and organisational profiles, share best practices, benchmarks and information on the tools they use. Members will be able to search and contact others to find information and collaborate on benchmarking projects. We will also be encouraging this sharing through providing a number of best practice awards to those organisations/people that share their best practices with others. All in all we want to make the BPIR the No.1 website for sharing best practices so that if you have a certain problem or issue you can raise it with our membership and obtain good ideas on how to move forward.

    For further information on social networking and the use of technology I have provided links to three interesting articles:

    Overview on Web 2.0 and social software – This is a short paper written by the Global Benchmarking Network that provides a simple introduction and explanation of Web 2.0 technology. Read full article: Overview of Web 2.0 and Social Software

    Social networking sites good for business – Good news for workers addicted to Facebook, Bebo and MySpace, a British think-tank says bosses should not stop their staff using social networking sites because they could actually benefit their firms.  The report by Demos said encouraging employees to use networking technologies to build relationships and closer links with colleagues and customers could help businesses rather than damage them. Click here for full article.

    Towards NHS 2.0 –  This white paper discusses the changes in the UK’s National Health Service. It draws parellels between the changes from a Web 1.0 (being fed generic information) to a Web 2.0 (networking and personalised information) environment and a Health 1.0 and Health 2.0 environment. It discusses what this means for patients and clinicians. Read full article: Towards NHS 2.0

    So, how can you help the BPIR? Please let me know what functionality you would like in the BPIR from a social networking perspective? How can we best help you to build up your networks and learn from other organisations? What service would help you the most?

    Looking forward to hearing from you,  Robin

    (Dr Robin Mann, Commercial Director and Part-Owner, BPIR.com Limited).

     


  4. You and the BPIR

    October 24, 2008 by admin

    Everyone that’s in business wants two things: more business and less work.
    Read that last line again and see if you spot the delicious pun, then think about it. Then think about where you fit into your company. Are you the owner? The bean counter? The junior executive assistance regional vice-manager? Regardless of how you fit into the grand scheme of things you have control over making your job easier and improving your company’s performance. Wait, wait wait. I have control? you ask. Ha! Do you know how many meetings and layers of management I have to go through to get anything done round here? Or alternatively, my job is to improve this company, and I’m pretty good at it thank you very much. See our last quarter results? That was me baby. I bought in a team of consultants. We had five strategy meetings a week. I got the results. Sorry, what was that? How did we do it? Well the consultants told me to implement a model. Which one? It’s a cutting edge one. How do I know it’s the right one? Look at the results! And the consultants are onboard for another two years to make it work. I’m not worried about the details, I’m paid to get results.

    Knowing what to do is two thirds the challenge, knowing how to do it is a whole other mountain. No matter where you are in the business world, if you know about the various ways to monitor and improve business processes then your job becomes that much easier and you’re that much more valuable. Being able to translate that knowledge to the real world means you can not only talk the talk, but walk the walk as well. And this ladies and gentlemen, is our segway into the BPIR. The BPIR (Business Performance Improvement Resource) is an information and networking resource that provides a complete library of benchmarking, business excellence (aka Total Quality Management), best practice and general performance improvement info. And we’re not talking disconnected theory that just sounds impressive. We research how these theories and models have worked in the real world and then include the results, the problems and the lessons as case studies so you can see how the ideas stack up in the real world. We’re staffed by some pretty amazing individuals who know what its like at the coal face, and we have issued over 10,000 passwords to BPIR to users in every level of every kind of business. Combine the information resources with the networking tools in place (and some very exciting ones opening up in the next few weeks) and you have a pretty amazing resource to help you do business better.
    This blog is our soap box to share our (it’s not just me, I like to share!) news, upcoming BPIR features and events, general musings and to discuss the world of business performance. I invite both existing BPIR members and casual readers to share their opinions and comments with us, and let us know your stories, challenges and what you’d like to see on this blog.
    A warm welcome from myself and the BPIR team to the journey that is business excellence!

    Chuck
    The BPIR Team.