1. Call for Papers: The International Journal of Innovation Science

    May 21, 2017 by ahmed

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    The International Journal of Innovation Science and The International Association of Innovation Professionals are pleased to announce a general Call for Papers.

    Papers can be submitted to https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijins

    About the International Journal of Innovation Science:
    The International Journal of Innovation Science publishes fundamental and applied research in innovation practices. As the official journal of the International Association of Innovation Professionals (IAOIP), the journal is a forum for the exchange of advanced knowledge in innovation, including emerging technologies and best practices, tools and techniques, metrics, and organization design and culture; as well as the stakeholder engagement, change management, and leadership skills required to ensure innovation succeeds.
    Areas of Coverage

    • Innovation processes, methods, techniques
    • Individual’s role in Innovation
    • Improvements in HR, marketing, finance, or other disciplines that enable innovation
    • Innovation practices in specific industries or countries
    • Innovation centers, incubators, labs…
    • Regional or national economic development/policies related to innovation
    • Innovation competency, skills
    • Innovation conventions, competitions, or training
    • Innovation for entrepreneurs
    • Regional impacts on innovation
    • Growing innovation through university programs
    • Attracting innovative companies and entrepreneurs

    The International Journal of Innovation Science is indexed and abstracted by EBSCO, ProQuest, ReadCube Discover, Scopus
    The Editor-in-Chief is Professor Brett Trusko


  2. Winners of the 5th International Best Practice Competition

    April 28, 2017 by ahmed

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    The 5th International Best Practice Competition was held at NMIMS University, Mumbai, India, 25/26th April 2017. The Best Practice Competition encourages organizations to share their best operational and managerial practices, processes, systems, and initiatives and learn from the experience of others. It provides an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of individuals and teams that have been responsible for creating and/or managing the introduction and deployment of best practices. The Best Practice Competition has been designed by the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER), the developers of the Business Performance Improvement Resource. Presentation videos will be on the BPIR soon.

    Dr Vandana Shinde and Pushpalatha Ravi, Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited with judges

    Dr Vandana Shinde and Pushpalatha Ravi, Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited with judges

    Winner:

    • Employee Health Management System, Dr Vandana Shinde, Manager Medical Services & Pushpalatha Ravi, Sr Manager (Information Systems), Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited (Mumbai Refinery), India

    Four runner-up

    • Application of the TRADE Benchmarking Methodology to improve the purchasing process, Ahmed Al Zarouni, Head Of Purchase Section, Rafeea E Aleghfeli, Head of Excellence Programs, Ali Eissa, Senior Purchase Officer, Hessa Al Ammadi, Head of Purchase Unit, Rahma Aal Ali, Head of Planning & Development Office, Dubai Municipality, United Arab Emirates
    • Visible leadership – A best practice in the application of the Tata Business Excellence Model, Sachin Garg, Head – Strategy & Business Excellence, Tata Housing Development Co Ltd, India
    • An initiative to raise People Happiness to world-class levels, Dr. Wafi Dawood, Chief of Strategy & Excellence & Kalthoom AlBalooshi, Executive Director of Education Development, Knowledge & Human Development Authority, Dubai, United Arab Emirates
    • A novel way of conducting an antibiotic management/stewardship program, Jameela Alsalman, Geriatrician, Ministry of Health, Bahrain

  3. Winners of the 1st Organisation-Wide Innovation Award

    by ahmed

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    The 1st Organisation-Wide Innovation Award was held at NMIMS University, Mumbai, India, 25/26th April 2017. This award recognises organisations that have embraced best practice learning and combined this learning with their own ideas and creativity to become highly innovative. The award recognises organisations that excel in inculcating an innovation culture throughout all facets of their operation from the leadership to employees and covering all stakeholders leading to innovative processes, products and services. The Organisation-wide Innovation Award has been designed by the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER), the developers of the Business Performance Improvement Resource. Presentation videos will be on the BPIR soon.
    Manin Kaur, Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (left) and Siang Hock Kia, National Library Board (right) with judges

    Manin Kaur, Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (left) and Siang Hock Kia, National Library Board (right) with judges

    Winner

    • NLB’s Organisation-wide innovation approach, Siang Hock Kia, Deputy Director, National Library Board, Singapore

    Runner-up

    • MPA’s Organisation-wide innovation approach, Manin Kaur, Assistant Director, Organisational Excellence, Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore, Singapore

  4. World Class Best Practices Showcasing in Mumbai, India 25/26 April

    April 15, 2017 by ahmed

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    The 40 qualifying best practices for the International Best Practice Competition from over 10 countries have been announced. Learn from their best practices on 25/26 April, Mumbai, India.

    Click here for the conference program.

    This is a unique opportunity to learn from international best practices and world-class Innovation (from applicants of the 1st Organisation-wide Innovation Award).

    The International Best Practice Competition will be held in Mumbai, India, 25/26th April 2017, courtesy of the BestPrax Club. Prime supporters of the competition are the Global Benchmarking Network, Asian Pacific Quality Organisation, Global Performance Excellence Award, and the Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce.

    The Competition will be followed by a Certification Workshop on Benchmarking for Excellence and Innovation on 27th and 28th April 2017 delivered by Dr Mann, the founder of the TRADE benchmarking methodology. This certified training will enable organizations to harvest, document, and trade best practices; and proactively challenge the best practices to create innovative next practices. It is a must for individuals that wish to further their career and organisation’s success – benchmarking is a necessity for sustainable competitiveness and to meet the ever increasing demands of stakeholders.
    Register through the BestPrax Club at:
    http://bestprax.com/ibpc/register.aspx for the International Best Practice Competition
    http://bestprax.com/trade/register.aspx for the TRADE Benchmarking Training Course


  5. To invent your organization’s future, experiment, question, sometimes fail

    April 14, 2017 by ahmed

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    Originally posted on Blogrige by Dawn Marie Bailey

    Create an innovation advantage for your organization by letting go of industrial-age principles, embracing imagination, and experimenting even if you might fail, said Polly LaBarre, co-founder and director of Management Lab (MLab) and co-founder of MIX (Management Innovation eXchange). LaBarre, who delivered the 29th Annual Quest for Excellence Conference keynote presentation, said, “You cannot have some big opportunities without having some big misses. . . . Mistakes should be shared and picked apart for every last tidbit of insight.”LaBarre asked the conference audience, “How do you build the capacity for innovation and the adaptability that keeps your organization growing and thriving?” and “Are you capable of changing as fast as the world is changing? . . . The next game changer probably will come out of nowhere. Your customers, patients, stakeholders have more information, more choice, higher expectations than ever before. . . . In that context, are you constitutionally adaptable?”

    The modern industrial-age organization was not built for adaptability and innovation, she said. Instead, the assembly-line plants from years ago were designed “to maximize standardization, specialization, predictability, and control,” said LaBarre, adding that the business model was to “get flesh and blood human beings to become widget-producing robots.”

    “All of the practices and systems that we have built and embedded in our organizations [including] budgeting, performance review, ROI calculations, inventory. . . . All of those things were invented over a century ago to routinize the nonroutine,” said LaBarre; “When [today’s] challenge is for every organization to become ever-more adaptable, ever-more innovative, ever-more inspiring and engaging, those principles don’t serve us well. There’s no competitive advantage left. . . . We can’t solve the new problems with the old principles.”

    Innovation

    LaBarre said that innovation in today’s organizations tends to get compartmentalized if it is not embedded in every activity, every function. “As a result, the 90% of people who do not have a formal innovation role, think of innovation as someone else’s job. And those companies then end up commercializing and capturing just a tiny potential of their people and their organizations,” she said.

    The efficiency principles of the industrial age are still critical and necessary, LaBarre said, but to “transcend the inevitable tradeoffs of discipline without the cost and the drag on agility . . . and the crushing of human initiatives,” organizations should also consider pro-innovation principles such as aspiration, experimentation, diversity, freedom, and openness. She illustrated several real organizations who have embedded such principles and asked the audience to consider, “What kind of sustaining advantage can innovation bring?”

    The first tip for our organizations, LaBarre said, is to expand autonomy. “Control [of people, information, deviation from the norm] is the wrong design when you want to unleash people’s best imagination, initiative, passion–the human gifts that are in so much demand today but which cannot be commanded or controlled into existence.”

    Freedom

    LaBarre pointed out that we’ve all experience a huge expansion of freedom in our personal lives, especially with our ability to connect with anyone, anywhere in the world. “We can challenge, speak up, have a voice in the world, but the workplace lags so far behind,” she said, adding that in their personal lives, people can buy houses, cars, etc., but in the workplace, they may not have the authority to purchase a desk chair.

    She asked the audience to consider, in their organizations, “Who does the thinking and who does the doing?” She described freedom as giving employees more opportunities and more channels to have meaningful roles.

    She shared with the audience that she has traveled around the world looking for organizations that have reinvented their management models, “swapping out industrial bureaucratic DNA for pro-innovation and pro-adaptability.” In some of these companies, LaBarre said she found employees with total autonomy, which is balanced by extensive accountability, especially by coworkers who, for example, conduct each other’s performance reviews. These organizations are growing their leadership capacity, she said.

    LaBarre spoke of the “latent creative potential” of employees and cultures of collaboration. Invite everyone to be part of the strategic and creative realm, she suggested. In one organization she visited, LaBarre said she found hundreds of “communities of passion” that work on strategic priorities and local problems, and resolve issues must faster than they could under a standard corporate model.

    “Design systems and practices for more headroom and elbow room,” she said, “so people can operate outside of their spheres. . . . People can find natural collaborators, pursue their passions, [find] the slack [they] need for trying new things, for experimenting, and for taking risks.”

    Experimentation

    “If you want to build innovative, adaptive capacity, there is no more powerful leverage than experimentation,” said LaBarre.

    How life itself has flourished is a perfect example of experimentation, according to LaBarre. “Life has become ever more capable and complex in the process without a CEO, SVP, or strategic plan at the helm,” she said. “Evolutionary progress . . . is a product of rampant experimentation. Mutations are mistakes. Let me put it another way, if life was run by Six Sigma, we would all still be slime.”

    LaBarre said experimentation is about cycling through ideas, testing assumptions, getting feedback, discarding what isn’t working, and building on what is. “It’s a strategy for measuring your insights,” she said.

    Organizations should develop the facility to fail in order to learn, because in the words of Pixar Animation Studios, according to LaBarre, “Pain is temporary. Suck is forever.” Or, in other words, she said, Pixar understands that “if you are going to try new things, you’re going to have errors” and that’s how you learn.

    Questions

    To truly build an innovation capability at your organization, “Ask more questions than you give answers,” she said. “If you’re open, curious, you can surface more possibilities. As a leader, craft stretch questions. . . . Invest as much in what could be as what is. . . . Walk in stupid. . . . Practice the innocence of children to gain fresh eyes to innovation.”

    She encouraged the audience to question every orthodoxy in their industries and to hack every process to imbue it with innovation principles. “Questions that no one has asked before spawn innovative answers that no one has sought before,” LaBarre said, adding “invite the subversive in.”

    Innovation Panel

    To further explore innovation, senior leaders from the four 2016 Baldrige Award recipients joined LaBarre on stage. They talked about how they define innovation and how they equip people to handle it.

    Roger Arciniega, CEO of Momentum, said, “Culture is most important. You need a structure for innovations to break through. A big barrier is employees not wanting to be associated with failure,” adding the importance of not having a “gotcha” mentality.

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    The health care senior leaders on stage, Maryruth Butler, executive director of Kindred Nursing and Rehabilitation Center – Mountain Valley, and Malisha Patel, vice president of operations at Memorial Hermann Sugar Land, discussed how to stimulate innovation and still ensure patient safety.

    Don Chalmers Ford’s Andy Strebe, director of fixed operations, said innovation sometimes means being open to ideas that make you uncomfortable. The leaders also talked about getting out of the way of employees’ ideas, integrating work processes with action plans, looking for innovation in the supply chain, simplifying innovation, trusting employees, and putting down your “pivot foot” (i.e., practicing values-based innovation).