1. Leadership practices of Stellar Solutions

    April 22, 2018 by ahmed

    stellar_rocket_fixed

    Originally posted on Blogrige by Dawn Bailey

    Five-Part Leadership Blog Series
    In this five-part blog series on the 2017 Baldrige Award recipients’ leadership presentations at the 30th Anniversary Quest for Excellence® Conference (April 8–11, 2018), senior leaders of the five new national role models share best practices and stories of how they achieved excellence.

    “Scientists Do Some Really Cool Stuff”
    Stellar Solutions, a woman-owned, aerospace engineering services business, has a noble vision: to align its employees’ dream jobs with critical customer needs, and among those customers are NASA, U.S. troops, the FAA, and even those of us who watch cable TV.

    According to Celeste Ford, founder and CEO, satellites in the sky send invisible signals to ground stations that turn them into meaningful data that allow us to receive cable signals and intelligence analysts and troops in the field to be informed. Stellar Solutions’ customers are those government and commercial entities that receive the needed data. “We pull [the data] together from end to end because there are different people building all of those things [from satellites to ground stations], and they have to work together. So, we’re systems engineers and systems integrators. . . . From SpaceX to the war in Syria, we work on the projects that give intelligence and information to our troops so that our government can do the right thing. Mission to Mars, we’re working on that, too,” she added.

    Ford said one way that Stellar Solutions has differentiated itself is to cross boundaries. “In aerospace, there are companies that handle civil and commercial, but . . . we do it all and take the nuggets of information from one sector to another as needed. And that is really a differentiator to getting things done quickly and innovatively,” she said.

    A Focus on Sustainability, Continuity
    A few years after founding the company in 1995, Ford said, they were getting good results, but “I always had this paranoia that I didn’t want to be the single point of failure as a founder. Now we had employees who were having babies and depending on us for putting food on their tables, so sustainability and continuity really became important to me.”

    In 2004, the company chose the Baldrige Excellence Framework. Why? Said Ford, “Because Baldrige is a framework that holds you accountable to what you think is important. It’s not a prescriptive checklist that makes you like everybody else, a fill-in-the-squares kind of thing.”

    Ford said the leadership staff viewed the Baldrige “Steps Toward Mature Processes” graphic. “I thought we were perfect because we were already doing everything that I could think of. . . . Then we sat down and said, besides financial results, what are our [forward-looking] metrics? How do we hold ourselves accountable for the most important thing [our vision: to satisfy our customers’ critical needs while realizing our dream jobs]? Our whole company is about that alignment. But how do you put a metric around that besides your gut?”

    When they started with the Baldrige framework, Ford said, we knew we had processes “because we got stuff done,” but there was no consensus. Today, the company has 16 defined processes supported by metrics. A monthly leadership meeting called Convergence, in addition to quarterly meetings, is used to focus and review the metrics and processes. In addition, templates are used to depict the processes; each template has a box for “what we care about the most” and the Baldrige evaluation factors.

    “We built Baldrige into the DNA of our company,” said Ford. “There isn’t a separate Baldrige thing. It’s just who we are.”

    100% Customer Satisfaction
    Stellar Solutions’ focus on its employees can be seen in its Fortune magazine’s distinction as “A Great Place to Work.” This distinction is super important, said Ford, “because we’re a services business. Our people are our products. You need to keep them, and you need to attract really good ones to do this hard work.”

    Of the nearly 200 Stellar employees, each employee can recite the vision. “It’s not something on a wall. It’s something that drives us every day,” she said.

    Ford said the company compares itself with the top 50 best companies because “we don’t want to compare ourselves to the average.” Recent results show that 97% of employees say that the Stellar Solutions Leadership Team “shows sincere interest in me as a person, not just an employee”; 97% say the Leadership Team “genuinely seeks and responds to my suggestions and ideas”; 97% say the Leadership Team’s “actions match its words”; 98% say the Leadership Team “is honest and ethical in its business practices”; and 100% say “I feel good about the ways we contribute to the community.”

    No Such Thing as a Plan on the Shelf
    Every single employee is involved in the annual strategic planning process. The focus is on “identifying what our current customers need, what new programs are out there that we should be working on, and what is happening and what should we do about it. . . . There’s no such thing at Stellar as a corporate plan that sits on an ivory shelf that no one looks at,” said Ford. “Every goal came from somebody for a good reason, from our customers’ critical needs and employee alignment with their dream jobs. Everyone owns a piece of our strategic plan. That’s important.”

    Stellar Solutions is organized by customer, with six goals or strategic perspectives:

    Goal 1: Current Customers
    (who are asked what’s the right size, right scope for Stellar Solutions’ involvement)

    Goal 2: Future Customers
    (focus is on innovation, new high-impact programs)

    Goal 3: Situational Awareness
    (to inform the way ahead, the question is asked, what customers and things should we be focusing on three years out?)

    Goal 4: Stellar Workforce
    (attracting and retaining key players)

    Goal 5: Business Operations
    (scaling smartly and working at “the speed of customers’ needs”)

    Goal 6: Community Support
    (Stellar Solutions includes Stellar Foundation to support community engagement and QuakeFinder, a project to build and qualify algorithms to detect earthquake precursor signals)


  2. BPIR Newsletter: Best Practice Report – Procurement

    April 17, 2018 by ahmed

     

     

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    Best Practice Report: Procurement
    This report outlines the best practice research undertaken by BPIR.com in the area of procurement. The best practices have been compiled under seven main headings. This layout is designed to enable you to scan subjects that are of interest to you and your organisation, quickly assess their importance, and download relevant information for further study or to share with your colleagues.


    Featured Events


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    2nd successful year of Dubai We Learn initiative

    It is one year since the Dubai Government Excellence Programme (DGEP) launched the 2nd wave of “Dubai We Learn” for government entities in Dubai. This ambitious programme consists of a range of knowledge sharing and organisational learning activities designed to fast-track organisational improvement and stimulate innovation. A key part of this initiative has been the mentoring of benchmarking projects by DGEP’s partner the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research, New Zealand. Read more

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    Reserve these dates: 
    The Global Organisational Excellence Congress, 10-12 December 2018,  Abu Dhabi, UAE

    Start planning now to attend the Global Organisational Excellence Congress

    This is going to be an event that gets you excited with a big WOW!

    The Abu Dhabi International Centre for Organisational Excellence of the Abu Dhabi Chamber of Commerce & Industry has brought together a number of prestigious international conferences/events into one major event.
    The Congress brings together:


    24th Asia Pacific Quality Organisation International Conference

    • ACE Team Awards Competition 2018
    • 18th Global Performance Excellence Award


    12th International Benchmarking Conference

    • 6th Global Benchmarking Awards


    6th International Best Practice Competition

    • 2nd Organisation-wide Innovation Award


    Sheikh Khalifa Excellence Award’s Best Practice Sharing Conference


    Add the Congress to your calendar


    Latest News

    • Leadership practices of the City of Fort Collins….read more?
    • A war room of strategic breakthroughs and other tools….read more
    • The 4 mistakes that leave you wondering about your business performance….read more
    • Rapid Benchmarking at New Zealand’s largest company….read more
    • Dubai Health Authority reveals results of Happiness Prescribing Program’s pilot phase….read more
    • The sixteen golden traits….read more

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    Service guarantee delivers refunds to patients of a US health system


    To ensure it delivered service excellence, the Geisinger Health System, a physician-led US health care system, improved access and enhanced care provision, implemented same-day appointments, and initiated an external scheduling app. To address interactions that troubled patients, Geisinger launched an initiative aimed at doing. it right for every patient every time’ that included a provision to give unsatisfied patients their money back. The refund programme was not focussed on the full experience, but rather the specific interaction that troubled the patient. It did not include `differences of opinion` for medical care, so doctors were not worried that their expertise would be questioned. An entire department was dedicated to listening to concerns and assess legitimacy and whenever a person requested a refund, a hospital study was done by patient advocates. In 2015/2016 over $400,000 in refunds were made to patients whose experiences and expectations were not met with kindness and compassion.


    Do you know that in the BPIR.com there are more than 200 Best Practice video clips? And increasing…

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    Baldrige winner shares expertise with other organisations

    After it won the Baldrige Award in 2010, K&N Management, US restaurant chain, received requests to share its best practices and its use of the Baldrige framework with organisations from around the world. In response K&N developed a cross-sector training programme for other organisations that included a half-day workshop on customer service, one- and two-day sessions to discuss K&N’s Business Excellence Model, its focus on continuous improvement, and its strategic planning and other processes, and how they were aligned with the Baldrige Excellence Framework. The training also allowed participants to experience K&N Management’s “guest-delight culture” through a tour of its restaurants. More than 1,400 people from 70 organisations, including those from the restaurant industry, defence companies, schools, hair salons, video gaming companies, and hospitals and clinics, have been enrolled in the training sessions.

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    BPIR Tip of the Month – Keyword Search

    This page offers a simple and alternative method of searching any of the main BPIR databases via key word(s) without having to go to the specific database pages .

     


  3. Leadership practices of the City of Fort Collins

    April 16, 2018 by ahmed

    fort-collins-quest18-leadership

    Originally posted on Blogrige by Christine Schaefer

    Five-Part Leadership Blog Series
    In this five-part blog series on the 2017 Baldrige Award recipients’ leadership presentations at the 30th Anniversary Quest for Excellence® Conference (April 8–11, 2018), senior leaders of the five new national role models share best practices and stories of how they achieved excellence.

    A City Rich in Relationships
    According to Fort Collins City Manager Darin Atteberry, his city is the fourth largest in the state of Colorado, with a current population of about 170,000 and expected growth to 250,000 in the years ahead. About an hour north of Denver, in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, Fort Collins is “definitely a college town,” Atteberry added. “Colorado State houses about 30,000 students … 6,000 faculty and staff on campus, … , and we take very seriously our relationship with … Colorado State.”The city itself employs 2,400, with approximately $3 billion in assets (e.g., roads, buses, parks, government facilities). Considered a “full-service city,” Fort Collins provides typical municipal services such as parks and recreation, roads, transit, and police services, while also providing all four major utilities (water, wastewater, storm water, and electric power) to its community. It will soon add a fifth utility for the community: household and business Internet access through broadband service.Atteberry stressed that Fort Collins is not only in a “great location” but, also, that it has a legacy of great relationships. “We’ve inherited greatness. In the 130-plus years of this city, there’s really not a history of bad ethics or lack of integrity … we’ve inherited amazing leadership … we’ve inherited amazing relationships between our residents and our local government,” he said, mentioning the community’s repeated support for the city when enhancing facilities or enduring economic downturns.

    “Local Government Can Be Great”
    In sharing the story of his city’s journey to excellence, Atteberry again stressed the belief he said he and his colleagues in the Fort Collins government share that “local government can be great”—an energizing conviction he also highlighted in his remarks at the ceremony where he accepted the city’s 2017 Baldrige Award. Atteberry realized the importance of this belief to his leadership of Fort Collins years ago while reading a Fast Company article that prompted him to ask himself, “What’s the one thing you believe that no one else believes?” A determination to demonstrate great government has evidently helped propel Fort Collins’ quest for excellence.

    Moving from “Trust Us” to Data-Driven
    During its pursuit of excellence, the city leadership moved from practices that reflected what Atteberry referred to as a “’trust us’ kind of government” to one that is “data-driven.” Therefore, today the city systematically measures its performance and publicly shares results. For this transition to fact-based management and fuller transparency, Atteberry credits the city’s use of the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence, which he said helped city leaders “be more intentional in our alignment of planning [for] budgeting and putting systems in place.”

    Focus on Culture + Strategy = Results
    Atteberry’s leadership presentation also emphasized the importance of his organization’s culture and its focus on strategy in achieving desired results. Atteberry recited the city’s mission (“to provide world-class municipal services through operational excellence and a culture of innovation”) and vision (“exceptional service for an exceptional community”) as he affirmed that the city’s culture is built around its mission, mission, and values.

    Part of the city’s strategy, said Atteberry, “is to be crystal clear about what we plan to accomplish and how we plan to budget accordingly.” The city’s strategic planning (short- and long-term), budgeting, measurement and reviews, and work system planning are all organized around the following seven major outcome areas (which were developed collaboratively by citizens, business representatives, and city staff members):

    • Neighborhood Livability and Social Health;
    • Culture and Recreation;
    • Economic Health;
    • Environmental Health;
    • Safe Community;
    • Transportation; and
    • High-Performing Government.

    Leadership System Model
    As shown in the graphic above, the city’s leadership system incorporates its strategy, culture, and results. (This model was created in 2012 as an improvement based on feedback the city received when participating in Colorado’s state-wide Baldrige-based award program, Rocky Mountain Performance Excellence [RMPEx]).

    “This structure allows us to really focus our business and see some amazing results,” said Atteberry.

    Results
    At the outset of his presentation, Atteberry pointed out that Fort Collins was named “America’s Most Satisfied City” by Time magazine in 2014 based on Gallup survey results. At the end, he highlighted the favorable trend over the past decade in residents’ ratings of city government services. As he reported, the percentage of residents who ranked the overall quality of city services as being good or very good increased from 77 percent in 2008 to 90 percent during the most recent survey.

    “To me, the Baldrige framework really demonstrates the value of culture and strategy, and we’re really here [as a Baldrige Award recipient] … because of the amazing, amazing framework,” said Atteberry.


  4. 2nd successful year of Dubai We Learn initiative

    April 14, 2018 by ahmed

    DWL2018Teams

    It is one year since the Dubai Government Excellence Programme (DGEP) launched the 2nd wave of “Dubai We Learn” for government entities in Dubai. This ambitious programme consists of a range of knowledge sharing and organisational learning activities designed to fast-track organisational improvement and stimulate innovation. A key part of this initiative has been the mentoring of benchmarking projects by DGEP’s partner the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research, New Zealand.

    The second wave of benchmarking projects came to an end on the 4 April 2018 when 11 project teams gave a presentation and submitted a benchmarking report to share their results. To learn more about the 1st wave and its result, refer to the recently published Dubai We Learn book.

    Project teams used the TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking Methodology – a rigorous step by step approach that involves searching for and implementing leading-edge practices. Each project team gave a 15-minute presentation and submitted a benchmarking report which was assessed by an expert panel. The projects were evaluated based on the TRADE Benchmarking Certification Scheme. Three of the teams achieved 7 Stars, four teams 5-6 Stars, and four teams 3-4 Stars. These were exceptional results as even to achieve 3-4 Stars and reach TRADE Benchmarking Proficiency is challenging within a one-year timeframe. The projects and grades were as follows:

    DWL2018_projects_rating

    Judging panel

    The project deliverables and presentations were assessed by an expert panel consisting of

    • Dr Robin Mann, Founder of TRADE, Centre for Organisational Excellence Research, New Zealand
    • Garvin Chow, First Vice President/ Director Corporate Learning & Development, United Overseas Bank Limited
    • Professor Dotun Adebanjo, University of Greenwich, London

    The achievements of all teams has been impressive. A description of the 7-Star projects is provided below.

    Dubai Police’s project has saved at least $3.8 million (Aug-2017 to Mar-2018) and is projected to save $5.4 million by August 2018 through increasing productivity in the mechanical workshop from 40% to 72% and increasing vehicle availability from 88% to 95%. The team conducted an intensive study of its current workshop practices and visited 8 organisations to learn from best practices. The improvements have largely been as a result of improved data accuracy and analysis of workshop operations which has enabled more informed management decisions such as closure of an inefficient workshop, changes to the shift pattern leading to a shorter turnaround of vehicles, and improved management of spare parts. These improvements have been achieved without investing in new equipment or machinery.

    The Dubai Government Human Resource (DGHR) Department’s project was to produce a blueprint for establishing an HR Think Tank. It was identified there was a need for a Think Tank to shape the future of HR within Dubai’s government and transform DGHR into a more ‘agile’ government entity – well prepared to respond to future challenges due to changes in technology, geopolitical situations and financial realities. To produce the blueprint the project team researched the needs of the Dubai Government and evaluated 102 Think Tanks with 6 international and 3 local benchmarking visits undertaken. The final blueprint was a 73 page document describing in detail the proposed purpose, structure, services and operating model of the Think Tank. The Vision of the Think Tank has been initially set as “Pioneering HR for the world!” and implementation of the blueprint will proceed through four phases and enable the Think Tank to provide three main services; research, smart library and consulting services. The major achievement of this project was having the blueprint signed off by the DGHR’s Director General with a planned launch of the Think Tank for later this year.

    The Dubai Health Authority’s (DHA) project aimed to reduce the number of people that are pre-diabetic (people at risk of becoming diabetic due to their high blood sugar levels). According to a 2017 survey, 15.2% of Dubai’s population is diabetic and 15.8% are pre-diabetic with the UAE as a whole having the 10th highest rates in the world. The DHA’s benchmarking project involved extensive desktop research reviewing the approaches of other countries in tackling diabetes and benchmarking visits to 9 organisations. Of key importance was that DHA recognised that it would not be able to have a significant impact on Diabetes on its own and therefore needed to work closely with other stakeholders that could influence or play a role in reducing diabetes. The major contribution of this project was the development of a Dubai Diabetes Prevention Framework consisting of five elements:

    • promoting healthy life style,
    • creative and innovative sustainable interventions,
    • early screening on diabetes mellitus and risk factors,
    • enforcement of non-communicable diseases policy, and
    • supportive health system and partnerships.

    For each element there is a strategy and a range of programs and initiatives of which a number have already been implemented and others are to follow. The project is on track to reduce the pre-diabetic population by at least 10% by 2021, an ambitious target considering the adverse trends in some of the risk factors such as obesity, unhealthy diet, smoking and lack of exercise.

    To promote learning and sharing of experience the recording of the presentations from all teams will be uploaded to BPIR.com. As part of this initiative, Centre of Organisational Excellence Research (COER) will publish a series of articles about the initiative. To receive the latest news sign-up to COER’s newsletter here.


  5. A war room of strategic breakthroughs and other tools

    April 7, 2018 by ahmed

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    Originally posted on Blogrige by Dawn Bailey

    When an organization ponders a journey to performance excellence, it may wonder where to begin, what to measure, and what to expect, including what short-term successes are achievable. Such pondering could be made much simpler with a field guide.
    Jayne Pope, chief executive officer, and Emily Padula, chief strategy officer, for 2014 Baldrige Award recipient Hill Country Memorial (HCM), will share their strategy at a session titled “A Field Guide to HCM’s Remarkable Strategic Breakthroughs” at the Baldrige Program’s annual Quest for Excellence® Conference in April.

    In a recent virtual exchange (captured below), Pope and Padula collaborated on answering questions, ranging from their upcoming presentation to their funniest Baldrige moment.

    What will Quest for Excellence attendees learn at your conference session?
    Participants will learn how HCM develops its strategic goals and fully deploys them throughout the organization, with specific tools and measurable outcomes. The presentation is a field guide to achieving your next strategic breakthrough.

    How has your organization benefited from its journey to excellence?
    The Strategic Breakthrough Initiative (SBI) is one of the processes that HCM has embraced along its Baldrige journey. It has given us the focus we needed to accomplish hundreds of strategic action items. We started SBIs in 2011 and saw huge improvements within two years. We are now reaching twice as many of our strategic goals.

    As a Baldrige Award recipient, HCM started a Sharing Days program for organizations on performance excellence journeys. Over time, we have shared some of our helpful practices with hundreds of people. Our SBI process and war room format became a popular takeaway. We have since had many attendees send us back pictures of their “war rooms” and tell us how helpful the SBI process has been for them. The process has worked for all kinds of organizations, including a luxury car company, schools, banks, universities, and other hospitals.

    What are your top tips for introducing or sustaining use of the Baldrige framework to promote an organization’s success?
    At HCM, we regularly measure internally and assess our performance on all the typical items you would find in Baldrige Criteria category 7 (results). We measure externally through annual Baldrige coaching assessments, which help us identify our strengths and our performance excellence gaps.

    We learned so much from completing the Baldrige application for so many years. It was the best education process for us. We continue to complete some version of the application every year, even though we are not eligible to apply again for a few years.

    What do you view as key reasons or ways that health care organizations benefit from using the Baldrige framework?
    In health care, we owe it to our patients and community to be the best that we can be. The Baldrige framework sets the highest bar. It helps us to figure out how to be best in every aspect of our business, from workforce engagement to patient safety. We compare ourselves to the very best, and we learn from them while being challenged to become better.

    What is your “elevator pitch” about the Baldrige framework and/or assessment approach? In other words, what would you say to a group of senior leaders who are unfamiliar with the Baldrige framework if you had 1-2 minutes to tell them something about it?
    We would say that Baldrige is a proven means of making your organization great for the people it serves and those who work for you. The framework supports long-term sustainability and leads to innovation—which is especially needed right now in the health care world, as well as in many other industries.

    Do you have any funny stories or anecdotes that you’re willing to share about your experience with Baldrige?
    The funniest story happened at our Sharing Days. Two reluctant employees were sent by their boss to learn about the hospital’s Baldrige experience. By the end of the program, the women were really engaged and excited to share their Baldrige knowledge with their boss. A few days later, we received a photo of them wearing red t-shirts that said—We drank the Baldrige Kool-Aid!