1. Just doing nothing gets you nothing

    August 24, 2016 by ahmed

    doing-nothing-gets-you-nothing

    Originally posted on Blogrige by Dawn Marie Bailey

    When just beginning something-be it a journey for improvement or an initiative to ensure you are prepared and fortified for unavoidable challenges-it’s best to start small, just one step at a time.

    At the upcoming Baldrige regional conference in Chicago, Melanie Taylor, deputy superintendent, curriculum and instruction, at Baldrige Award recipient Iredell-Statesville Schools, will outline how to start small on a Baldrige journey—and why such a journey is so important for educators, as well as for others.

    To help an organization get started, Taylor said she plans to touch on key areas; for example,

    • the Organizational Profile
    • Are We Making Progress?
    • Baldrige Excellence Builder

    “I’m going to talk about starting small,” said Taylor. “You’ve got to get started in order to improve. Just doing nothing gets you nothing. Eat the elephant one bite at a time.”

    Through a series of questions, I asked Taylor to give me some background on her topic “How to Get Started on Your Baldrige Journey?” and what learnings she intended to share with the regional conference audience.

    What do you feel is the value of a Baldrige journey?

    Baldrige provides some established, proven criteria to help you. Start with a self-assessment to gain a better understanding of how well you’re communicating your goals, mission, vision, and values internally and externally. Baldrige resources also provide considerations on developing relationships that give you an opportunity to network and benchmark with other organizations and learn best practices. It’s an opportunity to grow and improve what you’re already doing. You may think you’re doing well, but how does that compare to others?

    What are your top tips for using Baldrige resources to support education?

    The Baldrige framework helps with identification and alignment of key processes to get everyone in your organization moving in the same direction and focused on the things that matter. By getting everyone around the table up front, you’re able to be more effective. We’ve also been able to become more efficient, especially on the operations side. This is especially important in light of the cuts that many states (at least North Carolina) have seen in recent years.

    The Baldrige framework also has considerations for measurement and comparisons. By really looking at your data and that of other similar districts that may be outperforming you with similar subgroups or in certain areas, you’re able to identify exemplars to learn best practices.

    It’s helpful to get someone in your organization trained on the Baldrige framework relatively early on. You’ll need some experts on board to help with clarification and to help move the processes along.

    It’s also important for leadership to be bought in and to model behaviors for staff. At Iredell-Statesville Schools, senior leadership was great at modeling expectations. We trained/implemented Baldrige thinking all the way down to the kid/classroom level, so it was pervasive at all levels of the organization. If kindergartners can understand and utilize Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA; continuous improvement), anyone can do it.

    What else might participants learn at your conference session?

    My focus will really be on processes for schools to take home. While I’m always happy to share our district experiences and my personal reflections, my focus will be on ways to get started on your journey and the importance of doing something.


  2. Seven fundamentals of a winning innovation team

    August 19, 2016 by ahmed

    innovation

    Originally posted on The Innovation Resource by Robert Tucker

    Sooner or later, you’re going to be asked to lead an innovation team. This will be your time to shine, if you’re up to the challenge. The distinguishing aspect of leading a special purpose team is that you’re not in control, you can only influence behavior. You’re tasked with figuring out how to do something new, so you and your mates are going on a learning journey. So what you do in the formative stages will greatly impact the team’s chances of success. Follow these seven suggestions to guide your success:

    1. Keep team size small, even for big projects. In Silicon Valley, the “pizza rule” has taken hold. If you can’t feed a team with two pizzas, your team is too big. Lots of research supports this notion. Once a group gets beyond five to seven people, productivity and effectiveness begin to decline. Communication becomes cumbersome. Managing becomes a pain. Players begin to disengage, and introverts withdraw. When it comes to team size, less is more.

    2. Pay attention to group chemistry and emotions. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon point to three factors that make a team highly functioning. 1) Members contributed equally to the team’s discussions, rather than letting one or two people dominate; 2) Members were better at reading complex emotional states; and 3) Teams with more women outperform teams with more men. The emotional component – how we feel when we are engaged with a team – truly matters but is all too often never discussed. Pay attention to how the people you’re inviting onto your team relate to others. Assess human factors like trust, empathy, ability to resolve conflict, and seek and offer forgiveness. Acknowledge people’s selfless behavior and achievements. Always give credit to your team rather than take credit yourself, and practice empathy at all times.

    3. Calculate people’s Teamwork Factor. Will Wright, developer of The Sims, Spore and other best-selling computer games, analyzes what he calls a person’s teamwork factor. “There is a matter of, how good is this person times their teamwork factor,” Wright told interviewer Adam Bryant. “You can have a great person who doesn’t really work well on the team, and they’re a net loss. You can have somebody who is not that great but they are really very good glue, and [they] could be a net gain.” Team members Wright considers “glue,” share information effectively, motivate and improve morale, and help out when somebody gets stuck. Be aware of not only the needed skill sets, but who works well together and who does not.

    4. Don’t go overboard with diversity. Can too much diversity be a detriment to team chemistry? Researchers at Wharton think so. Too much diversity of “mental models” can be a drag on forward progress, say professors Klein and Lim. If members of a team have a “shared, organized understanding and mental representation of knowledge” about the nature of the challenge, it can enhance coordination and effectiveness when the task at hand is complex, unpredictable, urgent and novel. The researchers concluded that team member who share common models can save time because they share a common body of knowledge.

    5. Establish a group process. Nancy Tennant, who led an amazingly successful innovation initiative at Whirlpool some years ago, once told me about joining an ad hoc governmental team tasked with solving a very big problem. “They brought a group of people together from all over the world to help them brainstorm. They spent a lot of money, put us in a room and said ‘think hard.’ But we didn’t know each other. We didn’t have a group process. And we just couldn’t do it.” A group without a process is like a ship without a rudder. It will have a harder time innovating. Establish team rules at the outset. Address how you’ll treat each other, how you’ll respect each other, and articulate how much of time each member is committing to the team. Effective teams establish clear goals and rules at the outset, and hold each other accountable.

    6. Pay attention to what is going on outside the team. Since your dedicated team is charged with getting something new accomplished, it is natural to think of it as the “innovation team.” But doing so leads those not part of the team wondering how the project will effect them, and whether they support or oppose the team’s challenge. You must be careful to begin building buy-in for your efforts from the very beginning. Day to day managers see innovation teams as a threat or a special case that should be ignored. Teams appointed by the CEO can be seen as the ‘CEO’s pet project’ leaving a chance for them to be condemned or subtly derailed. Team leaders and members must spend as much time working in the external environment as working in their team. Be sure to build trust and open communication with the rest of the organization.

    7. Pay attention to the 3Rs of innovation: Result, Reputation, and Residuals. What motivates people over the long haul is not money, but intrinsic rewards. Harvard’s Teresa Amabile’s research shows that feelings of accomplishment, that we are making progress, doing important work are the biggest motivators. As the team leader, keep the three Rs in mind: 1) Result. If you hit your target, you’ll have another accomplishment on your track record; 2) Reputation: your status in the organization rises. Senior management will be delighted. Colleagues will talk you up, praise your contribution, and invite you to join future projects. 3) Residuals: the lasting payout of participating in a successful collaborative team is that you get to see your “product” being used by customers, both internal and external. You know you’ve made a difference, solved a problem, or created an opportunity for the organization, your team, and most of all yourself.


  3. One Way to Carve Your Values- and Culture-in Stone

    August 14, 2016 by ahmed

    Originally posted on Blogrige by Dawn Marie Bailey

    How are you expected to behave at work? And do you think a coworker would answer this question in the same way?

    In the Baldrige Excellence Framework and its Criteria, values are defined as the guiding principles and behaviors that embody how your organization and its people are expected to operate. They influence and reinforce your organization’s desired culture. Further, they support and guide the decisions made by every workforce member, helping your organization accomplish its mission and attain its vision appropriately.

    So can you name your company’s organizational values?

    You may have to go to your company’s website to find them or dig out an operating manual, but what if the organizational values were literally carved into stone at your feet. Would you then have any question about the behaviors expected of you at work?

    In summer 2015, two-time Baldrige Award recipient MidwayUSA completed Operation Concrete Values, a project where more than 300 employees permanently carved their values into the sidewalks of the 21-acre MidwayUSA campus in Columbia, Mo. The carved values are now repeated across the entire 4-building campus, covering 17 entrances for a total of 20 sets of company values.

    Image-2-Max-Stacey-Eric-and-engraving

    MidwayUSA’s stated values are Honesty, Integrity, Humility, Respect for Others, Teamwork, Positive Attitude, Accountability, Stewardship, and Loyalty. Now carved in stone throughout the campus, they serve as the non-negotiable family principles that help guide MidwayUSA’s employees in their decision making and interactions with one another. But an important point here, according to the organization, is that these are the personal values of the people who work at MidwayUSA, which have been adopted by the organization.

    MidwayUSA’s CEO and founder, Larry Potterfield, explained the genesis of the idea: “It all began in the fall of 2006, as we started aligning the operations at MidwayUSA with the [Baldrige] leadership and management principles [in preparation for a Baldrige Award application],” wrote Potterfield in a short story about Operation Concrete Values. “One of the Baldrige questions was, ‘What are your stated vision, purpose, mission, and values?’

    We had a mission statement . . . but we struggled long and hard over the concept of company values. You see, values aren’t strategies, they aren’t goals; they’re about ethics—doing the right thing. . . . They come from employees. . . . Great companies simply adopt the most relevant of those values, then hire employees who share them.”

    Image-3-Closeup-of-hand-holding-tool

    Continued Potterfield, “Values must be deployed. . . . Every employee must know and share the same values, to create a culture of trust. Our mission statement was posted in multiple locations throughout each building, and our interviewing and reviewing processes were updated. . . . But then came a revolutionary idea; why don’t we engrave our values into our sidewalks, as a further reminder to each employee, our quests, and prospective employees.

    image-4

    In celebration of the engraving project, what the organization believes to be the first of its kind in the nation, Potterfield said, “Our company values are much more than checking a box and feeling good about it. Our values are something each and every one of our employees personally identify with, and they are embodied both at home and at work. We think something this important should be more than simply written down, it should be carved in stone.”

    A strong adherence to core values that shape culture is of course a hallmark of Baldrige Award recipients.

    For example, in a recent blog about Baldrige Award Recipient Elevations Credit Union, Kim Felton wrote, “At Elevations, we build our team to serve our membership by believing in and demonstrating our five core values: Integrity, Respect, Passion, Creativity, and Excellence. We are so pleased when members share with us that they see our core values reflected in everything we do.”

    At Baldrige Award Recipient Charter School of San Diego (CSSD), everything school employees do is based on the organizational value “kids come first” and the core competency “transforming lives.” For example, CSSD resource centers (where teachers work one-on-one with students) sponsor families for meals and school supplies during winter holidays, support work experiences for students, and provide career and health support for students and their families. Teachers also make a regular practice of visiting students’ homes, traveling in pairs.

    At Baldrige Award Recipient Mid-America Transplant (MTS), the organizational values of Compassion, Innovation, Integrity, Quality, and Teamwork serve as a guiding force for how the workforce lives the culture on a daily basis. MTS defines what each value means to each employee: “Compassion: We feel and show concern for others. Innovation: We make meaningful changes to improve. Integrity: We act according to what is right and wrong. Quality: We do our best, always. Teamwork: We work in harmony with others.”

    At Baldrige Award Recipient Charleston Area Medical Center Health System (CAMCHS), employees receive training on how the values of Quality, Service with Compassion, Respect, Integrity, Stewardship, and Safety should drive behaviors, and the behaviors drive achievement of the core competency to improve the health and economics of CAMCHS’ community.

    So do you know what are your organizational values and whether they drive your culture? Is your organization ready to set them in stone?


  4. The 3 major ways used to categorize wastes by influential Japanese gurus

    August 5, 2016 by ahmed

    lean

    Originally posted on Linkedin by Mohammad Elshahat

    Norman Bodek often called “The Godfather of Lean” couldn’t imagine how simple the instructions of Mr. Ohno which were the basis of Toyota Production System. Norman said (1988): “There’s nothing very complex in the magic of Mr. Ohno’s teachings”, he continues: “In fact, it is often confusing listening to him because he talks so simply, often just saying to look for and eliminate waste. We cannot believe that it is that simple – but it is true.”

    ” Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication .” Leonardo da Vinci

    Learning to see wastes is the first skill that you have to develop with your people, and eliminating those wastes should be on the top of your priorities. Developing small wins of discovering wastes and converting them into value was the heart of Toyota Production System. From the beginning, where your customer places an order to the point when the customer receives what he asked for, there are many processes and activities in the way. Your customer is not willing to pay for you, because you just have the cutting edge technology, or the best experts in a certain field, customers only pay for what solves their problems regardless of what you do to come up with that product or this service. The only one who cares about your product/service is You!

    “All we are doing is looking at the time line, from the moment the customer gives us an order to the point when we collect the cash. And we are reducing that time line by removing the non-value-added wastes.” Taiichi Ohno

    3 waists 1

    So, understanding wastes and how to identify them across your value chain is the lifeblood for your lean implementation. Knowing the types and classifications of wastes will help you to easily discover them. There’re many classifications of wastes, but in this article, I’m going to share with you the major three:

    1. Taiichi Ohno’s classification (7 wastes)
    2. Yasuhiro Monden’s classification (4 wastes)
    3. Hiroyuki Hirano’s classification (5MQS wastes)

    Taiichi Ohno’s Classification

    In my last article, I have briefly discussed the seven wastes which have been introduced by Taiichi Ohno (1988) – one of the inventors of Toyota legendary. It’s very important how you prelude these types of wastes to your people, instead of just informing them with the seven wastes in a bullet format or using this acronym ‘TIMWOOD” – it’s only a good way for remembering, but not for learning. You can open a discussion with your people using questions.

    The Socratic Method to Unlock People’s Capability

    A lean leader should realize the incredible power of questions and how it could shape people’s thoughts and let them learn virtually anything. In fact the entire Socratic Method is based on the teacher is doing nothing but asking questions, directing the student’s focus and getting them to come up with their own answers.

    “He who asks questions cannot avoid the answers” Cameron Proverb

    Michael Ballé and Art Smalley in their article “The Spirit of Lean” shared seven questions that will help in understanding the seven wastes and to stir and develop the “lean mindset” in your team.

    1. Are we producing too much or too soon?
    2. Are operators waiting for parts to arrive or for a machine to finish a cycle?
    3. Are we keeping conveyance to a minimum?
    4. Are we over-processing parts?
    5. Do we keep on the workstation more parts and components than the minimum to get the job done?
    6. Do we keep motion that does not contribute directly to value-added to a minimum?
    7. Do we avoid the need for rework or repairs?

    Many “lean consultant” has started a training session by writing the 7 wastes on a board, and never returned to them again because they were too busy with the tools! Using the Socratic Style in your training will make a big difference with your people and how they perceive the seven wastes, following the above questions with the WHY question will make you discover the real root causes to these wastes and then you’re about to drive them all out.

    Yasuhiro Monden’s Classification

    “Toyota Production System: An integrated approach to just in time” is one the best books that describes TPS from an academic standpoint. Monden introduced four kinds of wastes that can be found in manufacturing operations:

    1. Excessive production resources
    2. Overproduction
    3. Excessive inventory
    4. Unnecessary capital investment

    Excessive production resources could take many shapes; excessive workforce, excessive facilities, excessive inventory, when these elements exist in a amounts more than necessary, whether they are people, equipment, materials or products, they only increase cash outlay (costs) and add no value.

    Excessive production resources create the secondary waste – overproduction. Overproduction is regarded as the worst type of waste at TOYOTA. Over production is to continue working when essential operations should be stopped.

    Overproduction causes the third type of waste – excessive inventories. Extra inventory creates the need for more manpower, equipment, and floor space to transport and stock the inventory. These extra jobs will further make overproduction invisible.

    Given the existence of excessive resources, overproduction and inventory over time, demand for the fourth type of waste would develop. This fourth type, unnecessary capital investment, includes the following:

    • Building a warehouse to store extra inventory
    • Hiring extra workers to transport the inventory to the new warehouse
    • Purchasing a forklift for each transporter
    • Hiring an inventory control clerk to work in the new warehouse
    • Hiring an operator to repair damaged inventory
    • Establishing processes to manage conditions and quantities of different types of inventory
    • Hiring a person to do computerized inventory control

    These four sources of wastes raise administrative cost, direct material costs and direct or indirect labor costs and overhead costs such as depreciation, etc.

    Hiroyuki Hirano’s classification

    Stability is a key element in sustaining the success of Toyota. Sustaining stability in the 5Ms; Man, Machine, Method, Material and Management is the first goal that a lean leader has to focus on, but it would be a little bit harder to reach stability, when the 5Ms are fatty. By maintaining stable 5Ms and freeing them from wastes, you can accomplish your highest targets of Quality and Safety.

    3 waists 2

    The 5MQS scheme identifies seven types of waste, five of which begin with the letter “M”: Man, Material, Machine, Method, and Management. The “Q” in the 5MQS formula stands for Quality and the “S” for Safety.

    This figure shows the seven categories of wastes and how they include many hidden opportunities for improvement if we just stop and take a look. Although the first classification for wastes by Ohno is the most famous one, the other two are very valuable and could be used. In my perspective, Monden’s classification is a re-formulation of what Ohno stated (The 7 wastes) and it gives us an understanding of what the root cause of overproduction – excessive production resources. On the other hand, Hirano’s framework is a good one for organizations that start their lean implementation, as it directly hits the five foundations (5Ms) for any organization looking for stability, quality and safer workplace.

    Begin with the end in mind

    All things are created twice, so having a framework for identifying wastes in mind is a good way to keep your people motivated to waste elimination. Although, it is not a necessity that they’re going to discover wastes just by knowing that, but visualizing the end target in mind and keep moving toward it is better than getting to hunt wastes in a chaotic manner. After that, you can start your Waste Walk individually or with cross-functional team to identify Muda at your workplace.

    Last but not least, eliminate waste purposefully, get the most out of the Waste Walk, and let your team experience the power of lean by unlocking the hidden opportunities for improvement.


  5. A bold vision for community health: Use framework to align resources, improvements

    July 31, 2016 by ahmed

    heart

    Originally posted on Blogrige by Dawn Bailey

    Teenage pregnancy, obesity/lack of physical activity, drug use, and student drop-out rates are all issues on which Baldrige Award recipient Charleston Area Medical Center Health System (CAMCHS) has been working directly with its community for more than 20 years, said Brenda Grant, chief strategy officer. However, such efforts to improve the population’s health weren’t always focused or forward thinking (i.e., systematic), she added during a June 2016 HealthDoers Learning Lab on Collaborative Leadership: Part III, from Population Health to Healthy Communities.

    Through her health systems’ work with the Baldrige Excellence Framework, Grant said she became aware of the Communities of Excellence 2026, a nonprofit organization that is adapting the Baldrige framework for use by whole communities “to achieve and sustain the highest quality of life for their people” and to give such community efforts a framework for improvement and alignment.

    “I have seen the Baldrige framework help us become a better organization by answering and responding to the questions [in the Baldrige Criteria within the framework] and making sure we have strong approaches to deployment, learning, and integration,” said Grant, “so I am excited about the framework being established for communities of excellence and really think that could be a guide for us as we move into the future for our community.”

    Grant said CAMCHS’s involvement in population health started by looking at the needs in the community and developing programs around those needs. In 1994, a steering committee called the Kanawha Coalition for Community Health Improvement was formed to include other county hospitals, the United Way, the school system, behavioral and family health organizations, churches, and many others. The committee’s mission is to identify and evaluate community health risks and coordinate resources. But Grant said when they started the coalition for improvement, they realized that reacting to problems was really the process for how problems would be addressed.

    “There were a lot of different people working on problems but not really in a coordinated manner,” she said. Now, the committee is moving through early systematic approaches to aligned approaches using a community needs assessment, which includes random telephone surveys, focus groups for low-income and minority populations, and targeted surveys, as well as forums where the community identifies the top issues. Using available data, the committee then comes up with 10–15 community priorities. At a community forum, education is provided on those topics, random voting is conducted, and the community selects the issues for work groups to pursue.

    Rick Norling, retired CEO of Baldrige Award recipient Premier, Inc., said such work in the community reinforces “the value of a collaboratively generated community strategic plan to pull all of these efforts together as community-based priorities.” He added that health care organizations increasingly need to move toward partnering with their communities not just for compliance but for improving population health.

    “I personally believe [a community health needs assessment and implementation strategy] can be a powerful driver for improving the health of our communities, so that’s why I really want to focus on taking the work that we’re currently doing and moving it even in a more substantial manner,” said Grant. “We have a long history of trust, working with the community. But the potential is still there to be a powerful driver for health. That’s why . . . the Baldrige journey has really been helpful for us. . . . One of the core values of Baldrige is a systems perspective that talks about managing all parts of your organization as a unified whole to achieve your mission. And that really was helpful to us internally as we looked at health care transformation.”

    Norling defined population health management as building a partnership among a health care system and members of a community. The best hospitals and health systems, he said, are building a strategy of becoming population health managers.

    “To pursue population health management, the sites of care go well beyond a traditional health system, all the way to the family home, a key site of care,” he said. “Retail pharmacy, minute clinics, grocery stores, wellness centers, senior housing, they bring a whole new dimension of complexity to the systems of care required and the need for much more collaborative leadership.”

    Norling said the Communities of Excellence (COE) criteria have been created in conjunction with the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program and are currently being piloted in communities. The first pilot is Live Well San Diego, which has been adopted by the San Diego County Board of Supervisors as its strategic plan, said Norling; over 150 community organizations have become Live Well partners, agreeing to collaborate and with the county health and human services department organizing the effort. Norling said the criteria are being implemented and improved concurrently.

    Live Well San Diego’s performance will be enhanced by adopting the criteria, and feedback from attempting to adopt those criteria will provide us feedback to improve them, said Norling, adding that other community pilots are taking place around the United States.

    “I think what’s happening in San Diego County is a pretty exciting example of what this kind of systems thinking in a community can create,” Norling said. “It would seem that hospitals and health systems should be active participants, if not the leaders in this journey, and the culture of health requires this kind of broad perspective.”

    Added Stephanie Norling, managing director, Communities of Excellence 2026, “The COE framework really represents the next logical iteration in the current population health movement. CAMCHS is a great example of a health system’s journey from clinical care to population health, and the addition of a systems-based, community-wide framework is really the next step in achieving the kind of breakthrough results we need for our communities and their residents.”

    In regards to results, which are part of any Baldrige assessment, the COE framework also brings with it the element of measurement, something new to many community initiatives. “[Baldrige] provides the opportunity for us to have the framework to respond to questions that will make us a better community. It will also help us with results,” said Grant. “One of the things that we struggle with is how do you measure community health improvement, how do we know that we really are improving. . . . Having a group of communities to benchmark [that are using the COE framework] would just be invaluable to us in the future.”