1. South African Quality Institutes latest news

    September 23, 2016 by ahmed

    South African Quality Institute (SAQI) http://www.saqi.co.za is the national body that co-ordinates the Quality effort in South Africa. Their monthly newsletter is an excellent source of information to keep up with the latest quality issues in South Africa.

    SAQI201609

    • Construction Quality – Success Factors, by Jaco Roets
    • Documented information and knowledage management, by Paul Harding
    • Suitability, adequacy and effectiveness of QMS, by David Hoyle
    • Quality and safety: A different language, by Bill Coetzee
    • Competition law: Bad economic times can be good business for others, by Terrance Mark Booysen
    • Quality in schools: Is failure a golden opportunity?, by Richard Hayward

    Click here to download download this newsletter.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


  2. Bringing a systems approach to U.S. population health

    September 20, 2016 by ahmed

    process

    Originally posted on BlogrigeB by Christine Schaefer

    Our proposed framework would improve how we monitor and manage health for the U.S. population. Essentially, it translates the Baldrige framework to address U.S. population health.”, Julie Kapp

    Every year a new cohort of Baldrige Executive Fellows gains intensive knowledge about leading organizations to excellence through cross-sector, peer-to-peer learning hosted at the sites of Baldrige Award recipients. Every Baldrige Fellow completes a capstone project as part of the executive leadership program.

    A paper on the capstone project of Julie M. Kapp, MPH, PhD, a 2014 Baldrige Fellow, is being published this month in Systems Research and Behavioral Science. Kapp is an associate professor in the Department of Health Management and Informatics at the University of Missouri School of Medicine in Columbia, MO.

    Following is an interview of Kapp about the publication of the Baldrige-based approach to U.S. population health.

    What inspired your capstone project?

    This publication A Conceptual Framework for a Systems-Thinking Approach to U.S. Population Health was inspired by the work I have done up to this point in my career within the health care sector, as well as within the education sector and with community-based organizations.

    In my past role as the executive director of the Partnership for Evaluation, Assessment, and Research at the University of Missouri in St. Louis, I met with dozens of community-based organizations that were putting their passions to work for the greater good of the St. Louis area. At that time, within the St. Louis area, 4,076 organizations were registered with the Internal Revenue Service as tax-deductible charitable organizations. Those organizations span sectors and multiple programmatic areas, such as education, public health, crime prevention, mental health, and community development. Many work with area school districts or to improve economic stability.

    Despite the vast number of organizations actively focused on such issues in and around struggling areas of St. Louis, much work needs to be done to strengthen their capacity, readiness, and use of strong evaluation planning and evidence-based decision making to ensure effective results for the betterment of the region.

    This challenge isn’t specific to St. Louis, and a movement around the country encourages a collective impact approach. This has been defined as the commitment of cross-sector organizations toward a common goal, with five conditions for success identified as (1) a common agenda; (2) a backbone support organization; (3) mutually reinforcing activities; (4) shared measurement systems; and (5) continuous communication (see J. Kania and M. Kramer, Stanford Social Innovation Review, 2011).

    The more deeply I became involved—and after I transitioned to my current role at the School of Medicine at the University of Missouri in Columbia—the more I came to believe that the five conditions listed above for collective impact are not enough. To improve the effectiveness of how community-focused organizations address health and other issues, we must change their funding requirements. To change their funding requirements on a broad scale requires change at the federal level. Therefore, what is required is a systems approach. This is a key way in which my proposed framework reflects the Baldrige Excellence Framework.

    What were the milestones of your project? Did you receive any key feedback from sharing your capstone progress with other Baldrige Fellows?

    The entire experience was exceptionally beneficial. The chemistry and collegiality among our cohort of Baldrige Fellows elevated the experience even further. I learned so much from each of them, and from the leadership—Bob Fangmeyer [Baldrige director], Harry Hertz [Baldrige director emeritus], Bob Barnett [Baldrige Fellows executive in residence], and Pat Hilton [Baldrige Fellows program manager].

    Dr. Steven Kravet, president of Johns Hopkins Community Physicians, co-authored the paper, contributing his physician’s perspective as well as his perspective as another Baldrige Fellow.

    What is your vision for how this capstone project is improving/has improved something significant at your organization? Could you please describe any results or impacts so far?

    Our proposed framework would improve how we monitor and manage health for the U.S. population. Essentially, it translates the Baldrige framework to address U.S. population health, with two overarching recommendations: (1) drive a strategic outcomes-oriented, rather than action-oriented, approach by creating an evidence-based, national reporting dashboard; and (2) improve the operational effectiveness of the workforce.

    The current infrastructure is fragmented and misaligned. A 2013 National Research Council and Institute of Medicine report identifies how the United States has for decades lagged behind our high-income peer countries on a number of health indicators, including life expectancy. To reduce this U.S. health disadvantage through system-level change, we must begin to align and integrate and be able to visually display health and health care organizations’ shared metrics; allocated dollars on shared metrics; programs and activities on shared metrics; progress reports on shared metrics; and evidence-based and effective practices on shared metrics.

    With the publication of this framework, I hope to distribute it to as many key stakeholders that impact U.S. health as possible, including researchers, leaders of federal agencies, national organizations, and legislators. It is relevant to the secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; National Research Council; U.S. Surgeon General; AcademyHealth; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovation Center; state government organizations; and nonprofit organizations and foundations, among others. Next steps include beginning to operationalize the framework at the local, state, and federal levels.

    We can’t afford not to consider an aligned and integrated systems-thinking perspective for improving U.S. population health.

    What were your key learnings from the Baldrige Fellows program?

    Baldrige opened my eyes to alignment and integration, a systems approach, and feedback loops. Those concepts were apparent during our group’s visit to Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital in Downers Grove, Illinois [a 2010 Baldrige Award recipient]. It was so helpful to see what excellence looks like in operation. Good Samaritan Hospital also really brought home the message for me that having the right leadership is everything.

    The ideas that are part of the Baldrige framework are really helpful. But the real learning and growing comes when you have to do the hard work of answering the questions in addressing your particular challenge.

    Could you please share a few insights you gained from delving into the Baldrige framework during the Baldrige Fellows sessions that you can use for the benefit of your own organization?

    Yes. First, make sure you have a clear vision and can communicate it. The “why” is our reason for being. It motivates us each day.

    Second, the difference between success and failure is in the “how.”

    Third, being transparent in sharing data and action plans and progress on metrics goes a long way to build trust in an organization’s leadership and confidence in a process.

    Finally, stay the course. Don’t lose faith.

    Could you please describe the value/benefits you see of the Baldrige framework to your sector?

    Health care organizations are familiar with the Baldrige framework [which includes the Health Care Criteria for Performance Excellence], but it is not used widely enough. And as of now, the discipline and implementation of approaches to U.S. population health are not reflecting the Baldrige framework. I hope our paper provides those involved with U.S. population health a framework to use to move forward.

    With the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act initiatives, the country is moving in the direction of integrating these two sectors, which is extremely challenging to do without an overarching framework. I have not yet seen anyone else [but the Baldrige Program] provide such an applied, operational framework that essentially addresses the how, the process.


  3. TRADE best practice benchmarking workshops

    September 19, 2016 by admin

    Upcoming workshops in 2016

    • Sept 29 – 30: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • Nov 2 – 3: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai, UAE. To register contact, Salman Viralipurath, salman.viralipurath@dqg.org

     

    All finalists of the GBN’s Global Benchmarking Award in 2014 were users of the TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking Methodology – the methodology developed by the Centre for Organisational Excellence Research (COER). The winner was the Consumer Credit Risk Management Department, OCBC Bank, Singapore. The award recognizes organisations that show how benchmarking (comparing and learning from others) is an integral part of their improvement and innovation drive. For further information on the award and OCBC’s approach click here.

    To organise a public TRADE workshop in your country or an In-house Workshop contact the trainer and founder of TRADE, Dr Robin Mann, r.s.mann@massey.ac.nz. Click here for more information on TRADE and its certification scheme.

    Past workshops in 2016

    • Jan 19 – 21: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai
    • Apr 14 – 15: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • Apr 26 – 28: TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking (Dubai We Learn), Dubai. (For Dubai government entities only as part of the Dubai Government Excellence Programme). To register contact, Ms. Maha Ahmad email: maha.ahmad@tec.gov.ae
    • May 16 – 19: Benchmarking for Excellence in the Public Sector, Pasig City or Tagaytay City, Philippines. To register contact, Melanie Mercader, mercaderm@dap.edu.ph

    Past workshops in 2015

    • Mar 26 – 27: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • Apr 22 – 23: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai – UAE (more info)
    • Apr 29 – 30: Benchmarking for Excellence, Muscat – Oman (more info)
    • Jun 1 – 2: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai
    • Sept 7 – 9: TRADE Best Practice Benchmarking (Dubai We Learn), Dubai. (For Dubai government entities only as part of the Dubai Government Excellence Programme). To register contact, Ms. Maha Ahmad email: maha.ahmad@tec.gov.ae
    • Sept 14 – 16: Benchmarking for Excellence, Manila, Philippines. To register contact, Melanie Mercader, mercaderm@dap.edu.ph
    • Sept 21 – 23: Benchmarking for Excellence, Tagatay, Philippines. To register contact Melanie Mercader, mercaderm@dap.edu.ph
    • Sept 28 – 29: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • Dec 1 – 3: Benchmarking for Excellence, Manila, Philippines. To register contact, Melanie Mercader, mercaderm@dap.edu.ph

    Past workshops in 2014

    • March 26 – 27: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai (more info)
    • April 24 – 25: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • April 28 – 29: Benchmarking for Excellence, Subang – Malaysia (more info)
    • Aug 12 – 13: Benchmarking for Excellence, Wellington – New Zealand (more info)
    • Sept 24 – 25: Benchmarking for Excellence, Abu Dhabi – UAE (more info)
    • Oct 8 – 9: Benchmarking for Excellence, Tehran – Iran (more info)
    • Oct 20 – 21: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai – UAE (more info)
    • Oct 22 – 23: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (more info)
    • Nov 20 – 21: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)

    Past workshops in 2013

    • March 7 – 8: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • March 19 – 20: Benchmarking for Excellence, Penang – Malaysia (more info)
    • May 30 – 31: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • September 25 – 26: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai – UAE (more info)
    • September 29 – 1 October: Benchmarking for Excellence, Abu Dhabi – UAE (more info)
    • October 9 – 10: Benchmarking for Excellence, Dubai – UAE  (more info)
    • October 23 – 24: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuala Lumpur – Malaysia  (more info)
    • November 18 – 19: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • November 21 – 22: Benchmarking for Excellence, Wellington – New Zealand (more info) (Registration form)


    Past workshops in 2012

    • January 10 – 11: Benchmarking for Excellence, Qatar (Workshop in Arabic)
    • March 1 – 2: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • March 14 – 15: TRADE Benchmarking Training, London – UK (more info)
    • March 20 – 21: TRADE Benchmarking Training, London – UK (more info)
    • March 27 – 28: Benchmarking for Excellence, Philippines (more info)
    • October 4 – 5: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • December 3 – 4: Benchmarking for Excellence, Auckland – New Zealand (more info)

    Past workshops in 2011

    • Jan 10 – 11: Benchmarking for Excellence, Tehran – Iran
    • Jan 13 – 14, 2011: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • Jan 17: Introduction to Benchmarking Using ‘T.R.A.D.E’ Methodology, Singapore (more info)
    • Feb 13 – 14: Benchmarking for Excellence, Abu Dhabi, UAE (more info)
    • Feb 20 – 22: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuwait (more info)
    • Feb 28 – 1 Mar, 2011: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • Mar 30 – 31: Benchmarking for Excellence, Wellington – New Zealand (more info)
    • May 8 – 10, 2011: Certified Benchmarking Training, Abu Dhabi, UAE (More Info)
    • May 11 – 12, 2011: Certified Benchmarking Training, Dubai, UAE (More Info)
    • June 27 – 29: Benchmarking for Excellence, Bahrain (more info)
    • July 7 – 8: Benchmarking for Excellence, Mumbai (more info)
    • July 19 – 21: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuala Lumpur (more info)
    • July 28 – 29: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • August 30 – 31: Benchmarking for Excellence, Wellington (more info)
    • September 28 – 30: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuala Lumpur
    • October 13 – 14: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore
    • November 27 – 29: Benchmarking for Excellence, Abu Dhabi – UAE (more info)
    • December 6 – 8: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuwait (more info)

    Past workshops in 2010

    • Apr 15 -16: Professional Benchmarking, Glasgow – UK (more info)
    • Apr 21 -22: Professional Benchmarking, London – UK (more info)
    • May 2 – 3: Professional Benchmarking – Bahrain (more info)
    • May 13 – 14: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • May 18 – 20: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuwait (more info)
    • Jun 7 – 8: Benchmarking for Excellence, Abu Dhabi, UAE (more info)
    • Aug 17 – 18: Benchmarking for Excellence, Auckland, New Zealand
    • Sep 16 – 17: Benchmarking for Excellence, Singapore (more info)
    • Nov 30 -1 Dec: Professional Benchmarking, London – UK (more info)
    • September 17 – 18: Benchmarking for Excellence, Kuala Lumpur – Malaysia  (more info)

  4. 7 mistakes good Managers NEVER make

    September 15, 2016 by ahmed

    good manager

    Originally posted on UK Employee Experience Awards by Tamara Luzajic

    Finding good workforce is never easy. On the other hand, you can often hear managers complaining about their best employees leaving. Needless to say, having good people quit is very disruptive and incredibly costly.

    But once the employee has left, managers usually blame some external factors, while the real reason is left unsaid:

    People leave jobs because of bad management.

    There are a few things good managers never do. That is how they keep their best people loyal.

    1. They overwork people

    Nobody loves to feel burned out. Sure, once you realise your employees can do a lot of things, it is tempting to work them hard. But this is a trap!

    The truth is, overworking good employees makes them feel punished for being good at something. But, that can be changed with rewards and recognition. Raises and promotions are acceptable ways to increase workload.

    If you simply increase workload without changing a thing, your best and talented employees will look for another job that will give them what they deserve.

    2. They show no interest in their employees

    There is a reason why successful companies make sure their managers know how to balance being professional with simply being human.

    These managers empathise with the employees going through hard times. They challenge people. They celebrate their success.

    Managers who don’t genuinely care will always have high turnover rates. Good employees don’t like to work for bosses who only care about profit.

    3. They hire wrong people

    There is no way a hard-working employee will want to work with a slacker. Hiring bad people is one of the biggest demotivators because good employees want to work with the like-minded professionals.

    Promoting the wrong people is perhaps even worse. Being passed over for a promotion that is given to a slacker is more than wrong. It is an insult to every good employee.

    4. They don’t support creativity

    One of the best things about good employees is that they always look for new ways to improve everything. If you take that power from them because you like things the way they are now, you will make them hate their job.

    Supporting your best employees’ creativity is always a good idea.

    5. They are not developing people’s skills

    One of the things good managers always do is listening. They are constantly listening, giving feedback and paying attention to their employees’ behaviour.

    There is so much a manager can do with a good employee; from finding areas in which they can approve to directing their skills into the right direction, management truly has no end. But if you don’t do any of this, you will have a bunch of bored employees on your hands and the best ones leaving for something better.

    6. They don’t challenge employees

    Pushing people out of their comfort zones is what makes them succeed eventually.

    Good managers challenge their employees to accomplish goals that seemed impossible at first. Then, they do everything to help them achieve those goals.

    Talented employees can’t stand doing things that are too easy or boring because they know that they only way to develop their skills further is to do new tasks and set higher goals.

    7. They don’t support people pursue their passions

    Talented employees are passionate about things they love. When a good boss provides an opportunity for pursuing that passion, it improves their productivity.

    Unfortunately, so many managers are more likely to disapprove of this. They usually fear that if their employees pursue their passions, their productivity will decline.

    Many studies show that people who are able to pursue their passion at work experience flow, the almost euphoric state of mind that makes a person more productive.


  5. Benchmark Memo: September 2016

    September 10, 2016 by ahmed
    Greetings to our members,

    Read our Standard Benchmark Memo (for all members) or our SPRING Singapore Benchmark Memo (for members from Singapore) This month’s content includes:

    • Best Practice Events
    • BPIR News
    • Spotlight on Event – Benchmarking for Excellence Workshop, 29-30, Sept., Singapore
    • Best Practice Video: OCBC Bank: Our Benchmarking Approach
    • Best Practice Video: Strategic Focused Budgeting
    • 5th Global Benchmarking Award – Call for Entries
    • BPIR Tip of the Month: Expert Opinion
    • Featured Article: Keep stress down, productivity up
    • Saving a Million Lives through Best Practice Benchmarking

    Best Regards,

    Neil Crawford BPIR.com